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Investment Banking Areas Explained: Capital Markets
 
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Capital markets are one of the most fascinating areas of investment banking. Companies need these services when they are about to go public or want to issue debt sold to the public. When a company wants to raise equity, we talk about ECM, standing for Equity Capital Markets, and when it wants to raise debt, we talk about DCM, standing for Debt Capital Markets. On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/365careers/ On the web: http://www.365careers.com/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/365careers Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/365careers
Views: 112474 365 Careers
How investment banks profit from Trading and Brokerage
 
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What is Investment Banking Investment banking is a specific division of banking related to the creation of capital for other companies, governments and other entities. Investment banks underwrite new debt and equity securities for all types of corporations, aid in the sale of securities, and help to facilitate mergers and acquisitions, reorganizations and broker trades for both institutions and private investors. Investment banks also provide guidance to issuers regarding the issue and placement of stock. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_H8SEcfTAXlt5mHfRTDdNoivaUagZC87
Views: 154 The Course
8. What is Underwriting of Securties by Investment Bank?
 
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In this video, we discuss what is underwriting by Investment Banks and how they essentially ensure the fundraising of the company going for an IPO. What is Underwriting? When a firm looks to raise funds from the public, then they approach investment bankers to help them go to market, find investors etc. One of the functions of investment bankers is to ensure that the fundraising is a success. Underwriting means that if for some reason during an IPO, the firm is unable to raise the funds that they are looking for, then the Investment banks will compensate them by buying the unsold amount. For example, if company A is going for an IPO and was looking for $100 million public money. If due to some reason they are able to raise only $20 million. In this case, underwriting Investment Bank will purchase the remaining $20 million and sell the stock whenever there is a profit opportunity. You can visit this detailed article on underwriting to learn more - https://www.wallstreetmojo.com/investment-banking-underwriters-and-market-makers/
Views: 2276 WallStreetMojo
The different types of financial securities traded by investment banks
 
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What is Investment Banking Investment banking is a specific division of banking related to the creation of capital for other companies, governments and other entities. Investment banks underwrite new debt and equity securities for all types of corporations, aid in the sale of securities, and help to facilitate mergers and acquisitions, reorganizations and broker trades for both institutions and private investors. Investment banks also provide guidance to issuers regarding the issue and placement of stock. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_H8SEcfTAXlt5mHfRTDdNoivaUagZC87
Views: 54 The Course
What's the difference between investment banking and private equity?
 
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Sherjan Husainie, of Leaders Global Network, offers career workshops in ten major cities around the world. He has worked in both investment banking at Morgan Stanley and in private equity at Google Capital. For more info, visit http://www.leadersgn.com/
Views: 231529 Career Insider Business
Capital Raising Process (Underwriting)
 
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In investment banking, underwriting is the process where a bank raises capital for a client (corporation, institution, or government) from investors in the form of equity or debt securities. Click here to learn more about this topic: https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/finance/underwriting-overview/
Investment Banking: Industry Overview and Careers in Investment Banking
 
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Investment banks are notorious for their highly competitive working environment and long working hours for junior employees. Nevertheless, they continue to be seen as one of the prime destinations for talented Business and Finance graduates, given the excitement of working on large deals and the high pay scale that comes with this job. Investment banking operations tend to be more sophisticated than traditional “deposit taking, credit giving” retail banking services. Investment banks work closely with corporate clients, pension funds, financial sponsors and governments to structure and execute some of the largest transactions that we see in the news. On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/365careers/ On the web: http://www.365careers.com/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/365careers Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/365careers
Views: 93682 365 Careers
South Korea pushes to foster homegrown, mega-sized Investment Banks
 
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'한국판 골드만삭스', 증권사 초대형IB 탄생 Five brokerage firms in Korea have been given the green light to operate as investment banks,... after a years-long push to foster the country's own home-grown,... mega-sized Investment Banks modeled after Goldman Sachs. Of the five,... Korea Investment and Securities was the only firm permitted to issue short-term financing,... a key part of the investment banking business. Won Jung-hwan has the details. The Financial Services Commission, the country's top financial regulator, issued a license Monday to Korea Investment and Securities... allowing it to issue promissory notes and short-term corporate financing. There are four other securities firms -- Mirae Asset Daewoo, NH Investment and Securities, KB Securities, and Samsung Securities -- that are also expected to get the go-ahead in the near future. The preparations to nurture giant investment banks in Korea started back in 2011 with a regulatory roadmap to creating a so-called Korean version of Goldman Sachs. But local securities firms didn't yet have the capital. So last year, the financial authorities announced a plan to permit securities firms... that met a threshold of at least 3.6 billion U.S. dollars of equity capital to go into short-term corporate lending. Those with 7.2 billon dollars or more would be allowed to launch management accounts for corporate investors. Those changes put the big five securities companies on their way to becoming homegrown giant investment banks, and with Monday's decision, the first one now has the right to issue notes. But the traditional banking sector wants the decision to be put on hold as it could disrupt the corporate finance industry. The Korean Federation of Banks said the local securities industry lacks an oversight system to manage the issuance of such notes. Short-term corporate financing has traditionally been the province of commercial banks, which are subject to stricter rules and capital requirements. So there is some concern that the creation homegrown, mega-sized investment banks in Korea could destabilize the industry, especially amid a lack of regulation. Won Jung-hwan, Arirang News. Arirang News Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtvnews ------------------------------------------------------------ [Subscribe Arirang Official YouTube] ARIRANG TV: http://www.youtube.com/arirang ARIRANG RADIO: http://www.youtube.com/Music180Arirang ARIRANG NEWS: http://www.youtube.com/arirangnews ARIRANG K-POP: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld ARIRANG ISSUE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangtoday ARIRANG CULTURE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangkorean ------------------------------------------------------------ [Visit Arirang TV Official Pages] Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld Homepage: http://www.arirang.com ------------------------------------------------------------ [Arirang K-Pop] YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangkpop Google+: http://plus.google.com/+arirangworld
Views: 107 ARIRANG NEWS
Suits - Badass Mike and Harvey vs Investment Bankers
 
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From Season 5 Episode 9 of Suits Song: Cold Blood Artist: Dave not Dave Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favourite of fair use."
Views: 953611 yesididitverywell
What does an investment bank really do?
 
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Investment Bank(IB) is a financial intermediary that performs a variety of services. Investment Banks are mostly associated with very high paying jobs with total compensation inclusive of bonuses reaching millions in many cases. Though investment banking is a highly sought after career choice due to the fact that bankers can earn fat salaries in their young age itself, still there is a lot of confusion surrounding what does an investment bank actually do. They perform a variety of financial services and the major 5 are discussed in the video. They are: 1) Mergers & Acquisitions 2) IPO Deals 3) Proprietary Trading 4) Prime Brokerage 5) Private Wealth Management Do like the video and subscribe for much such videos!
Views: 38659 FinHead
How Goldman Sachs Came to Rule the World: Bank, Stock, Finance, Money
 
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The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. is an American multinational finance company that engages in global investment banking, investment management, securities, and other financial services including asset management, mergers and acquisitions advice, prime brokerage, and securities underwriting services. It also sponsors private equity funds, is a market maker, and is a primary dealer in the United States Treasury security market. Goldman Sachs also owns GS Bank USA, a direct bank. Goldman Sachs was founded in 1869 and is headquartered at 200 West Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City, with additional offices in other international financial centers.[3] Due to its involvement in securitization during the subprime mortgage crisis, Goldman Sachs suffered during the 2007-2008 financial crisis,[4][5] and received a $10 billion investment from the United States Department of the Treasury as part of the Troubled Asset Relief Program, a financial bailout created by the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008. The investment was made in November 2008 and was repaid in June 2009.[6][7] The list of former employees of Goldman Sachs who moved on to government positions includes former U.S. Secretaries of the Treasury Robert Rubin and Henry Paulson; current United States Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin; current chief economic advisor Gary Cohn; European Central Bank President Mario Draghi; former Bank of Canada Governor and current Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney and the current Prime Minister of Australia Malcolm Turnbull. In addition, former Goldman employees have headed the New York Stock Exchange, the World Bank, and major banks such as Citigroup and Merrill Lynch. On November 16, 1981, the firm acquired J. Aron & Company, a commodities trading firm which merged with the Fixed Income division to become known as Fixed Income, Currencies, and Commodities. J. Aron was a player in the coffee and gold markets, and the current CEO of Goldman, Lloyd Blankfein, joined the firm as a result of this merger. In 1985 it underwrote the public offering of the real estate investment trust that owned Rockefeller Center, then the largest REIT offering in history. In accordance with the beginning of the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the firm also became involved in facilitating the global privatization movement by advising companies that were spinning off from their parent governments. In 1986, the firm formed Goldman Sachs Asset Management, which manages the majority of its mutual funds and hedge funds today. In the same year, the firm also underwrote the IPO of Microsoft, advised General Electric on its acquisition of RCA and joined the London and Tokyo stock exchanges. 1986 also was the year when Goldman became the first United States bank to rank in the top 10 of mergers and acquisitions in the United Kingdom. During the 1980s the firm became the first bank to distribute its investment research electronically and created the first public offering of original issue deep-discount bond. Robert Rubin and Stephen Friedman assumed the Co-Senior Partnership in 1990 and pledged to focus on globalization of the firm and strengthening the Merger & Acquisition and Trading business lines. During their reign, the firm introduced paperless trading to the New York Stock Exchange and lead-managed the first-ever global debt offering by a U.S. corporation. It also launched the Goldman Sachs Commodity Index (GSCI) and opened a Beijing office in 1994. Also in 1994, Jon Corzine assumed leadership of the firm as CEO, following the departure of Rubin and Friedman.[19] Another momentous event in Goldman's history was the Mexican bailout of 1995. Rubin drew criticism in Congress for using a Treasury Department account under his personal control to distribute $20 billion to bail out Mexican bonds, of which Goldman was a key distributor.[20] On November 22, 1994, the Mexican Bolsa stock market had admitted Goldman Sachs and one other firm to operate on that market.[21] The 1994 economic crisis in Mexico threatened to wipe out the value of Mexico's bonds held by Goldman Sachs. In 1994, Goldman financed Rockefeller Center in a deal that allowed it to take an ownership interest[22] in 1996, and sold Rockefeller Center to Tishman Speyer in 2000.[23] In April 1997, Goldman was lead underwriter of the Yahoo! IPO. In 1998 it was the co-lead manager of the 2 trillion yen NTT DoCoMo IPO.[24] In 1999, Goldman acquired Hull Trading Company, one of the world's premier market-making firms, for $531 million. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldman_Sachs Image By Jdarsie11 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Views: 11971 The Film Archives
What is INVESTMENT BANK? What does INVESTMENT BANK mean? INVESTMENT BANK meaning
 
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What is INVESTMENT BANK? What does INVESTMENT BANK mean? INVESTMENT BANK meaning. An investment bank is a financial institution that assists individuals, corporations, and governments in raising financial capital by underwriting or acting as the client's agent in the issuance of securities. An investment bank may also assist companies involved in mergers and acquisitions (M&A) and provide ancillary services such as market making, trading of derivatives and equity securities, and FICC services (fixed income instruments, currencies, and commodities). Unlike commercial banks and retail banks, investment banks do not take deposits. From the passage of Glass–Steagall Act in 1933 until its repeal in 1999 by the Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act, the United States maintained a separation between investment banking and commercial banks. Other industrialized countries, including G7 countries, have historically not maintained such a separation. As part of the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (Dodd-Frank Act of 2010), the Volcker Rule asserts full institutional separation of investment banking services from commercial banking. The two main lines of business in investment banking are called the sell side and the buy side. The "sell side" involves trading securities for cash or for other securities (e.g. facilitating transactions, market-making), or the promotion of securities (e.g. underwriting, research, etc.). The "buy side" involves the provision of advice to institutions that buy investment services. Private equity funds, mutual funds, life insurance companies, unit trusts, and hedge funds are the most common types of buy-side entities. An investment bank can also be split into private and public functions with a Chinese wall separating the two to prevent information from crossing. The private areas of the bank deal with private insider information that may not be publicly disclosed, while the public areas, such as stock analysis, deal with public information. An advisor who provides investment banking services in the United States must be a licensed broker-dealer and subject to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) regulation.
Views: 7111 The Audiopedia
9. Market Making by Investment Banks
 
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In this video on Market making, we look at what is market making and how investment bankers help firms to trade by providing liquidity to the market. Market Maker is someone who actually ensures liquidity in the market. As one of the services, Investment banking firms provide liquidity for trading by either buying the shares or selling the shares. This ensures that the trades happen and ensures that the market is less volatile. You can learn more on Market making here - https://www.wallstreetmojo.com/market-makers/
Views: 814 WallStreetMojo
Business Brokers vs. Investment Bankers: What's the difference?
 
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http://cenkuslaw.com If you're selling a business, you're bound to interact with either a business broker or investment banker. So, what sets them apart from each other. Fundamentally, business brokers and investment bankers serve the same purpose in mergers & acquisitions - to help you sell your business by marketing your business and preparing it for sale. The distinguishing factors between business brokers and investment bankers is the deal sizes they touch. Investment bankers tend to operate at higher ends of the market and deal with larger companies whereas business brokers deal in the lower-middle market with deal sizes ranging up to about $10 million. As always, ask me any questions that pop up after watching the video! _____________________________________________ For a deeper dive into and other legal issues vital to the success of your deals and your business, visit me at: http://www.cenkuslaw.com Just starting up? Check this out for my advice on startup success: http://www.thestartupshepherd.com. You can also reach me at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brettcenkus https://twitter.com/BCenkus http://www.cenkuslaw.com http://www.cenkus.com _______________________________________________ About me: My 20+ years of experience in business finance, business law and entrepreneurship have led me to believe that numbers and logic are awesome tools, but understanding human nature and emotions is the first step to business success. The Cenkus Law Firm provides services related to mergers & acquisitions, general business issues and startups, including founders’ agreements and fundraising. I also consult with entrepreneurs and have invested my own capital as an angel investor. From 2010-2013 I served as Chief Legal Counsel of a publicly-trade international oilfield services company. From 2001 to 2006 me and a partner founded and built Paragon Residential Mortgage. Paragon was sold to Bridge Investments in 2006. I hold a Juris Doctorate from Harvard Law School and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics from Messiah College in Grantham, Pennsylvania. Now, I live in Austin, TX with my wife and two kids. I enjoy reading, running, classic movies, great food and wine and some great American football.
Views: 258 Brett Cenkus
What do investment banks actually do? - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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MoneyWeek’s Tim Bennett explains what investment banks actually do- and how they earn their huge profits. MoneyWeek videos are made by MoneyWeek, the UK’s most popular financial magazine. Founded in 2000, MoneyWeek aims to provide intelligent and enjoyable commentary on the most important financial stories. It also tells you how to make money from the latest financial news. For more videos and exclusive content please visit http://moneyweek.com/video-tutorial/
Views: 576589 MoneyWeek
Do Investment Banks Add Value to the Economy, Day Trade or Give Loans? (2003)
 
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An investment bank is a financial institution that assists individuals, corporations, and governments in raising financial capital by underwriting or acting as the client's agent in the issuance of securities (or both). An investment bank may also assist companies involved in mergers and acquisitions (M&A) and provide ancillary services such as market making, trading of derivatives and equity securities, and FICC services (fixed income instruments, currencies, and commodities). Unlike commercial banks and retail banks, investment banks do not take deposits. From 1933 (Glass–Steagall Act) until 1999 (Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act), the United States maintained a separation between investment banking and commercial banks. Other industrialized countries, including G8 countries, have historically not maintained such a separation. As part of the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (Dodd-Frank Act of 2010), Volcker Rule asserts full institutional separation of investment banking services from commercial banking. The two main lines of business in investment banking are called the sell side and the buy side. The "sell side" involves trading securities for cash or for other securities (e.g. facilitating transactions, market-making), or the promotion of securities (e.g. underwriting, research, etc.). The "buy side" involves the provision of advice to institutions concerned with buying investment services. Private equity funds, mutual funds, life insurance companies, unit trusts, and hedge funds are the most common types of buy side entities. An investment bank can also be split into private and public functions with an information barrier which separates the two to prevent information from crossing. The private areas of the bank deal with private insider information that may not be publicly disclosed, while the public areas such as stock analysis deal with public information. An advisor who provides investment banking services in the United States must be a licensed broker-dealer and subject to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) regulation. Investment banking has changed over the years, beginning as a partnership form focused on underwriting security issuance, i.e. initial public offerings (IPOs) and secondary market offerings, brokerage, and mergers and acquisitions, and evolving into a "full-service" range including securities research, proprietary trading, and investment management. In the modern 21st century, the SEC filings of the major independent investment banks such as Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley reflect three product segments: (1) investment banking (fees for M&A advisory services and securities underwriting); (2) asset management (fees for sponsored investment funds), and (3) trading and principal investments (broker-dealer activities including proprietary trading ("dealer" transactions) and brokerage trading ("broker" transactions)).[3] In the United States, commercial banking and investment banking were separated by the Glass–Steagall Act, which was repealed in 1999. The repeal led to more "universal banks" offering an even greater range of services. Many large commercial banks have therefore developed investment banking divisions through acquisitions and hiring. Notable large banks with significant investment banks include JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Barclays, and Wells Fargo. After the financial crisis of 2007–08 and the subsequent passage of the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010, regulations have limited certain investment banking operations, notably with the Volcker Rule's restrictions on proprietary trading.[2] The traditional service of underwriting security issues has declined as a percentage of revenue. As far back as 1960, 70% of Merrill Lynch's revenue was derived from transaction commissions while "traditional investment banking" services accounted for 5%. However, Merrill Lynch was a relatively "retail-focused" firm with a large brokerage network. The investment banking industry, and many individual investment banks, have come under criticism for a variety of reasons, including perceived conflicts of interest, overly large pay packages, cartel-like or oligopolic behavior, taking both sides in transactions, and more. Investment banking has also been criticised for its opacity. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Investment_banking
Views: 322 Way Back
BNP Paribas CIB - Trading Day
 
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Over a one day period we give you a snapshot into life trading on our London Floor.
Views: 409754 BNPParibasCIBStudent
5. Buy Side vs Sell Side in an Investment Bank
 
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In this video on Buy Side vs Sell Side, we discuss the top differences between the Buy Side vs Sell Side. Also, we look at how Buy Side and Sell Side are related to the Investment banking firms. Sell Side - In the context of Investment banking, we firm to the equity research department as sell side and the analysts are called as sell-side analysts. They are called as sell side as equity research firms provide research reports to the investors and the investors take trading decisions based on the reports. The trading is facilitated through the investment bank, thereby earning them a commision. Buy Side - The opposite of sell side is buy side. Equity research firms provide research to investors on the Buy Side. Buy Side firms are large institutions investors like Mutual funds, Insurance firms, pension funds etc. The analysts who work for a buy-side is known as a Buy Side Analyst. For more details, you may refer to this indepth article on Buy Side vs Sell side - https://www.wallstreetmojo.com/sell-side-vs-buy-side/
Views: 2434 WallStreetMojo
Private Equity: Industry Overview and Careers in Private Equity
 
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The Private Equity industry as we know it today is significantly larger compared to what it used to be 20 years ago. Nowadays pension funds, investment banks and high-net-worth individuals invest their money in private equity funds. The main idea is to use the money in order to acquire private or public companies, develop and improve their business, and then resell it at a considerable profit, given that the typical investment horizon ranges between 5 and 10 years. Private equity investments are risky, very illiquid and investors expect a significantly higher return compared to some of the other asset classes. Private Equity is one of the most desired career paths in the world of Business and Finance. Several years ago very few, if any, of the PE funds were hiring without relevant work experience. Today, it appears that more funds are willing to hire people with less experience. It is not rare to see intern and analyst openings within PE funds. However, if you’ve worked a couple of years in investment banking, consulting, or financial advisory, your chances of being hired increase significantly. Salaries vary based on the firm size and the country that you are located in, but they are generally 10-20% higher than the ones of investment banker analysts and associates with the same number of years of experience. On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/365careers/ On the web: http://www.365careers.com/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/365careers Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/365careers
Views: 20691 365 Careers
Investment Banking Careers at Goldman Sachs
 
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See how a career in Investment Banking offers early exposure to world-class clients and a platform to make a difference.
Views: 215243 Goldman Sachs
11 Difference Between Merchant Banking And Investment Banking
 
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1. Traditional merchant banks often expand into the field of securities underwriting, while many investment banks participate in trade financing activities.  2. Investment banks facilitate mergers and acquisitions through share sales and provide research and financial consulting to companies. 3. Based on: MERCHANT BANK:Fee based INVESTMENT BANK:Fee based and fund based 4. Example: Investment Banking: J.P. Morgan & Co. Bank of America Merrill Lynch Goldman Sachs Merchant Banking: J. S. Morgan & Co. Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. Samuel Montagu & Co. 5. Investment Bank is a financial institution that helps to government, corporate, HNI (High Net Worth) individual in raising capital. The merchant bank is a private financial institution that deals with international financial activities such as foreign corporate investment, foreign real estate investment and trade finance. 6. Investment banks focus on initial public offerings (IPOs) and large public and private share offerings. Merchant banks tend to operate on small-scale companies and offer creative equity financing, bridge financing and a number of corporate credit products. 7. Trade financing MERCHANT BANK:Offered to the clients INVESTMENT BANK:Rarely provided 8. Deals with: MERCHANT BANK: Small companies INVESTMENT BANK: Large companies 9. Functions of Investment Bank: Public Offerings of Debt and Equity Securities Private Placements of Debt and Equity Securities Raising Capital & Security Underwriting Mergers and Acquisitions Financial Advisory / Sponsor Group Finance Structured Finance / Securitization 10. Functions of Merchant Bank: To facilitate a client transaction To purchase securities in an operating company for the firm’s own account Facilitating Letter of Credit. corporate Financing 11. Investment banks often facilitate mergers and acquisitions activities. Merchant banks are not involved in M & A.
Views: 1550 Patel Vidhu
Five Investment Banks and Brokerage Firms to Add to Your Portfolio
 
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Investment banks help to allocate financial capital to its most efficient uses across firms and industries. Investment banks utilize their vast experience and network of institutional investors to facilitate the sale of securities, mainly stocks and bonds of companies seeking to raise capital. They help new companies become public through initial public offerings; and existing companies to raise additional funds for expansion. Investment banks play a crucial role in mergers and acquisitions, as firms try to improve their competitive posture in the global economy. Brokerage firms make it possible for investors to buy and sell financial assets. That is, the Brokerage industry is playing a crucial role in wealth management. With financial assets in the trillions, rising financial wealth due to rising stock prices, and a growing economy, the Brokerage companies have a bright future. Let's take a look at some of the best investment banks and brokerage firms TheStreet Quant Ratings says you should add to your portfolio, right now. Number 5 is Raymond James Financial. With an 'A-' rating, the company's strengths can be seen in its revenue growth and increase in net income. Fourth is, TD Ameritrade. This rating is also an 'A-.' TD Ameritrade thrives in its solid stock price performance and notable return on equity. Number 3 is Goldman Sachs. With an 'A-' rating the company flourishes in its revenue growth and compelling growth in net income. Second is Charles Schwab. With an 'A' rating, the company's strengths can be seen in its revenue growth and expanding profit margins. Number 1 is Lazard. With an 'A+' rating, the company has good revenue growth, and notable return on equity. TheStreet Ratings are algorithmic stock picks based on 32 major data points. S&P 500 stocks rated 'buy' yielded a 16-and-a-half-percent return in 2014, beating the S&P 500 Total Return Index by more than 300 basis points. For the full reports on these stocks, you can check out TheStreet.com/QuantRatings. Subscribe to TheStreetTV on YouTube: http://t.st/TheStreetTV For more content from TheStreet visit: http://thestreet.com Check out all our videos: http://youtube.com/user/TheStreetTV Follow TheStreet on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thestreet Like TheStreet on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheStreet Follow TheStreet on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/theStreet Follow TheStreet on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheStreet
Day in the Life of a Corporate Banker | J.P. Morgan
 
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SUBSCRIBE: http://jpm.com/x/i/NFPWfK0 Trish Devine, a managing director in Corporate Banking, help clients realize their objectives by leveraging different parts of the firm. About J.P. Morgan: J.P. Morgan is a leader in financial services, offering solutions to clients in more than 100 countries with one of the most comprehensive global product platforms available. We have been helping our clients to do business and manage their wealth for more than 200 years. Our business has been built upon our core principle of putting our clients' interests first. Connect with J.P. Morgan Online: Visit the J.P. Morgan Website: http://jpm.com/x/d/LPdzH4w Follow @jpmorgan on Twitter: http://jpm.com/x/i/NFPWLIB Visit our J.P. Morgan Facebook page: http://jpm.com/x/i/NFQoLBw Follow J.P. Morgan on LinkedIn: http://jpm.com/x/i/NFQoLGt #jpmorgan #jpmorgancareers Day in the Life of a Corporate Banker | J.P. Morgan
Views: 1238595 jpmorgan
Investment Banks and Brokerage Firms TheStreet Quant Ratings Recommends
 
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With Goldman Sachs recently announcing it will give away some of its trading secrets to its clients, we decided to check TheStreet Quant Ratings for investment banks and brokerage firms that would be good investments. According to a recent article in The Wall Street Journal, Goldman already has a few software applications that its clients can use from their phones and computers. The firm is planning on commercializing these apps. It will also give its clients some access to SecDb, the firm's risk management database. SecDb makes calculations of around 500,000 different market scenarios, with over 20 billion prices and at nearly 3 million positions. Gary Cohn, Goldman's President, called SecDb 'a significant competitive advantage,' during an investor conference in June. Here are some of the best investment banks and brokerage firms TheStreet Quant Ratings says you should consider looking at. Number 4 is Lazard. With an 'A-' rating, the company's strengths can be seen in its revenue growth and notable return on equity. 3rd is, TD Ameritrade. This rating is also an 'A-.' TD Ameritrade thrives in its solid stock price performance and expanding profit margins. 2nd is Goldman Sachs. This too has an 'A-' rating. The firm flourishes in its solid stock price performance and reasonable valuation levels. Number 1 is Raymond James Financial. With an 'A+' rating the company's strengths can be seen in its revenue growth and increase in net income. TheStreet Ratings are algorithmic stock picks based on 32 major data points. S&P 500 stocks rated 'buy' yielded a 16-and-a-half-percent return in 2014, beating the S&P 500 Total Return Index by more than 300 basis points. For the full reports on these stocks, you can check out TheStreet.com/QuantRatings. Subscribe to TheStreetTV on YouTube: http://t.st/TheStreetTV For more content from TheStreet visit: http://thestreet.com Check out all our videos: http://youtube.com/user/TheStreetTV Follow TheStreet on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thestreet Like TheStreet on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheStreet Follow TheStreet on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/theStreet Follow TheStreet on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheStreet
The Battle Between Investment Banks, Hedge Funds, and Private Equity on Wall Street (2009)
 
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The investment banking industry has come under criticism for a variety of reasons, including perceived conflicts of interest, overly large pay packages, cartel-like or oligopolic behavior, taking both sides in transactions, and more. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0470222794/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0470222794&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=122da9b4ed66d7e4eb80287e1bee5b2a Investment banking has also been criticized for its opacity. Conflicts of interest may arise between different parts of a bank, creating the potential for market manipulation, according to critics. Authorities that regulate investment banking (the FSA in the United Kingdom and the SEC in the United States) require that banks impose a "Chinese wall" to prevent communication between investment banking on one side and equity research and trading on the other. Critics say such a barrier does not always exist in practice, however. Conflicts of interest often arise in relation to investment banks' equity research units, which have long been part of the industry. A common practice is for equity analysts to initiate coverage of a company in order to develop relationships that lead to highly profitable investment banking business. In the 1990s, many equity researchers allegedly traded positive stock ratings for investment banking business. Alternatively, companies may threaten to divert investment banking business to competitors unless their stock was rated favorably. Laws were passed to criminalize such acts, and increased pressure from regulators and a series of lawsuits, settlements, and prosecutions curbed this business to a large extent following the 2001 stock market tumble after the dot-com bubble. Philip Augar, author of The Greed Merchants, said in an interview that, "You cannot simultaneously serve the interest of issuer clients and investing clients. And it's not just underwriting and sales; investment banks run proprietary trading operations that are also making a profit out of these securities."[30] Many investment banks also own retail brokerages. During the 1990s, some retail brokerages sold consumers securities which did not meet their stated risk profile. This behavior may have led to investment banking business or even sales of surplus shares during a public offering to keep public perception of the stock favorable. Since investment banks engage heavily in trading for their own account, there is always the temptation for them to engage in some form of front running -- the illegal practice whereby a broker executes orders for their own account before filling orders previously submitted by their customers, there benefiting from any changes in prices induced by those orders. Documents under seal in a decade-long lawsuit concerning eToys.com's IPO but obtained by New York Times' Wall Street Business columnist Joe Nocera alleged that IPOs managed by Goldman Sachs and other investment bankers involved asking for kickbacks from their institutional clients who made large profits flipping IPOs which Goldman had intentionally undervalued. Depositions in the lawsuit alleged that clients willingly complied with these demands because they understood it was necessary in order to participate in future hot issues.[32] Reuters Wall Street correspondent Felix Salmon retracted his earlier, more conciliatory, statements on the subject and said he believed that the depositions show that companies going public and their initial consumer stockholders are both defrauded by this practice, which may be widespread throughout the IPO finance industry.[33] The case is ongoing, and the allegations remain unproven. Investment banking is often criticized for the enormous pay packages awarded to those who work in the industry. According to Bloomberg Wall Street's five biggest firms paid over $3 billion to their executives from 2003 to 2008, "while they presided over the packaging and sale of loans that helped bring down the investment-banking system." [34] The highly generous pay packages include $172 million for Merrill Lynch & Co. CEO Stanley O'Neal from 2003 to 2007, before it was bought by Bank of America in 2008, and $161 million for Bear Stearns Co.'s James Cayne before the bank collapsed and was sold to JPMorgan Chase & Co. in June 2008.[34] Such pay arrangements have attracted the ire of Democrats and Republicans in Congress, who demanded limits on executive pay in 2008 when the U.S. government was bailing out the industry with a $700 billion financial rescue package.[34] Writing in the Global Association of Risk Professionals, Aaron Brown, a vice president at Morgan Stanley, says "By any standard of human fairness, of course, investment bankers make obscene amounts of money." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Investment_bank
Views: 37367 The Film Archives
What is Investment Banking Operations? - #KnowledgeBytes | Imarticus Learning
 
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When you aspire to become an expert investment banker, you need to excel in investment banking operations. The Mergers-and-Acquisitions accompanying raising of capital market through IBO process occupy the top place in the departments of investment banking. Third being STO(Security Traning Organisation) which includes the dealing of brokers in capital markets, i.e. equity and dead market. How does it operate? Clients of investment banking having a lot of capital book a deal with the assistance of an investment banking firm to make more money. Overall, Investment Banking Operation is the process from the initiation of customer booking a deal to the actual settlement of trade. As a responsible banker, have an optimistic attitude. Learning the new trends of the market and linking finance in everyday life can help in broadening concepts. Be in touch with the integrities of upcoming policies. Keep track on stocks. Remember the top and bottom 5 stocks of the day. In-depth knowledge of the flow of money and economy and the entire financial circle will make you gain expertise. Correlating the financial indicator of the country, i.e. index with the economic indicator of the country, i.e. the balance of payment would develop your understanding to a prominent level. Check our complete #ImarticusPrograms playlist here: http://bit.ly/2JP52hM Subscribe to our channel to get video updates. To know more about investment banking certification, please visit here - https://imarticus.org/certified-investment-banking-operations-program/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaigntype=youtube - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Why Imarticus? Imarticus Learning offers a comprehensive range of professional Financial Services and Analytics programs that are designed to cater to an aspiring group of professionals who want a tailored program on making them career ready. Our programs are driven by a constant need to be job relevant and stimulating, taking into consideration the dynamic nature of the Financial Services and Analytics market, and are taught by world-class professionals with specific domain expertise. Headquartered in Mumbai, Imarticus has classroom and online delivery capabilities across India with dedicated centres located at Mumbai, Bangalore, Chennai, Pune, Hyderabad, Coimbatore and Delhi. For more information, please write back to us at [email protected] Call us at IN: 1-800-267-7679 (toll-free) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Website: https://imarticus.org/ Facebook: https://bit.ly/2y6UjKW Twitter: https://bit.ly/2J11llx LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/2xwSoPM
Views: 2083 Imarticus Learning
Asset Management: Industry Overview and Careers in Asset Management
 
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Asset Management: Industry overview and Careers in Asset Management Asset Management is about managing clients’ investments and providing them with the strategies and expertise that would allow them to achieve their goals and secure their financial future. This video is part of our series dedicated to the different sub-industries in the world of Business & Finance.Our goal is to understand how it functions, what type of services it offers its clients, which are the major players in the field and what it is like to do this for a living. An individual or an institution is likely to approach an asset management firm when their investment income is substantial. In such cases, asset managers are able to offer expertise across a wide spectrum of asset classes (such as stocks, bonds, commodities, real estate, private equity, etc). Moreover, large firms have branches all over the world and are therefore able to offer geographical expertise as well. Given that asset managers closely follow all of these markets, they are able to offer high-quality advice and superior risk-return investments. The large players in the asset management industry are indeed very large. There are several companies whose assets under management exceed $1 trillion. Some of them are pure investment funds (BlackRock, Vanguard, StateStreet, Fidelity), while others are arms of the large banking conglomerates (Goldman Sachs, Deutsche Bank, UBS, BNP). The largest firm in the world in terms of assets under management in 2015 was BlackRock. On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/365careers/ On the web: http://www.365careers.com/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/365careers Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/365careers
Views: 124913 365 Careers
Top 3 Investing Accounts For 2018! 💸 (STOCK BROKERS FOR BEGINNERS)
 
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What are the best investing accounts or brokerage accounts out there? In this video, I will be outlining my top 3 investing accounts for 2018 and explaining why I recommend each of these to a potential new investor. NOTE: Non-US investors may be able to invest in Fundrise! More information is available here: http://cli.re/LPvvYb Watch More Investing Account Reviews! ✅ Betterment Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L72c6uaXh6Q&t=1s ✅ Betterment vs Wealthfront: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8z4xd9MMbk ✅ Fundrise Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyA7IOkfEss ✅ Top 3 Investing Accounts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM5Ouutn53k ✅ M1 Finance Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZiOw5ewRAY ✅ Robinhood Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpxfLizz6Pc ✅ M1 Finance vs Robinhood: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-a_ZKUO5LA ✅ Lending Club Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03SrysO-RbM ✅ Webull Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8dM7qZBLyU DISCLAIMER: Ryan Scribner, including but not limited to any guests appearing in his videos, are not financial/investment advisors, brokers, or dealers. They are solely sharing their personal experience and opinions; therefore, all strategies, tips, suggestions, and recommendations shared are solely for entertainment purposes. There are financial risks associated with investing, and Ryan Scribner’s results are not typical; therefore, do not act or refrain from acting based on any information conveyed in this video, webpage, and/or external hyperlinks. For investment advice please seek the counsel of a financial/investment advisor(s); and conduct your own due diligence. AFFILIATE DISCLOSURE: Some of the links on this webpage are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, we may earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase and/or subscribe. However, this does not impact our opinions and comparisons. HOLDINGS DISCLOSURE: Ryan Scribner holds the following stocks: General Electric (GE), Alibaba (BABA), JD(.)com (JD), Facebook (FB), Apple (AAPL) and National Grid (NGG). While reasonable steps are taken to keep this information updated, this list may not be the most current.
Views: 24605 Ryan Scribner
South Korea pushes to foster homegrown, mega-sized Investment Banks
 
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'한국판 골드만삭스', 증권사 초대형IB 탄생 South Korea has been pushing to foster its own home-grown, mega-sized Investment Banks modeled after Goldman Sachs since 2011. At last, the country's top regulator has allowed five IBs to expand their businesses beyond brokerage services. Won Jung-hwan sheds light on this development. The Financial Services Commission, the country's top financial regulator, issued a license Monday to Korea Investment and Securities... allowing it to issue promissory notes and short-term corporate financing. There are four other securities firms -- Mirae Asset Daewoo, NH Investment and Securities, KB Securities, and Samsung Securities -- that are also expected to get the go-ahead in the near future. The preparations to nurture giant investment banks in Korea started back in 2011 with a regulatory roadmap to creating a so-called Korean version of Goldman Sachs. But local securities firms didn't yet have the capital. So last year, the financial authorities announced a plan to permit securities firms... that met a threshold of at least 3.6 billion U.S. dollars of equity capital to go into short-term corporate lending. Those with 7.2 billon dollars or more would be allowed to launch management accounts for corporate investors. Those changes put the big five securities companies on their way to becoming homegrown giant investment banks, and with Monday's decision, the first one now has the right to issue notes. But the traditional banking sector wants the decision to be put on hold as it could disrupt the corporate finance industry. The Korean Federation of Banks said the local securities industry lacks an oversight system to manage the issuance of such notes. Short-term corporate financing has traditionally been the province of commercial banks, which are subject to stricter rules and capital requirements. So there is some concern that the creation homegrown, mega-sized investment banks in Korea could destabilize the industry, especially amid a lack of regulation. Won Jung-hwan, Arirang News. Arirang News Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtvnews ------------------------------------------------------------ [Subscribe Arirang Official YouTube] ARIRANG TV: http://www.youtube.com/arirang ARIRANG RADIO: http://www.youtube.com/Music180Arirang ARIRANG NEWS: http://www.youtube.com/arirangnews ARIRANG K-POP: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld ARIRANG ISSUE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangtoday ARIRANG CULTURE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangkorean ------------------------------------------------------------ [Visit Arirang TV Official Pages] Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld Homepage: http://www.arirang.com ------------------------------------------------------------ [Arirang K-Pop] YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangkpop Google+: http://plus.google.com/+arirangworld
Views: 83 ARIRANG NEWS
Why hire Investment banks as asset managers
 
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What is Investment Banking Investment banking is a specific division of banking related to the creation of capital for other companies, governments and other entities. Investment banks underwrite new debt and equity securities for all types of corporations, aid in the sale of securities, and help to facilitate mergers and acquisitions, reorganizations and broker trades for both institutions and private investors. Investment banks also provide guidance to issuers regarding the issue and placement of stock. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_H8SEcfTAXlt5mHfRTDdNoivaUagZC87
Views: 45 The Course
What is UNDERWRITING? What does UNDERWRITING mean? UNDERWRITING meaning, definition & explanation
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WORK FROM HOME! Looking for WORKERS for simple Internet data entry JOBS. $15-20 per hour. SIGN UP here - http://jobs.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is UNDERWRITING? What does UNDERWRITING mean? UNDERWRITING meaning - UNDERWRITING pronunciation UNDERWRITING definition - UNDERWRITING explanation - How to pronounce UNDERWRITING? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Underwriting services are provided by some large specialist financial institutions, such as banks, insurance or investment houses, whereby they guarantee payment in case of damage or financial loss and accept the financial risk for liability arising from such guarantee. An underwriting arrangement may be created in a number of situations including insurance, issue of securities in primary markets, and in bank lending, among others. The name derives from the Lloyd's of London insurance market. Financial bankers, who would accept some of the risk on a given venture (historically a sea voyage with associated risks of shipwreck) in exchange for a premium, would literally write their names under the risk information that was written on a Lloyd's slip created for this purpose. Securities underwriting refers to the process by which investment banks raise investment capital from investors on behalf of corporations and governments that are issuing securities (both equity and debt capital). The services of an underwriter are typically used during a public offering in a primary market. This is a way of distributing a newly issued security, such as stocks or bonds, to investors. A syndicate of banks (the lead managers) underwrites the transaction, which means they have taken on the risk of distributing the securities. Should they not be able to find enough investors, they will have to hold some securities themselves. Underwriters make their income from the price difference (the "underwriting spread") between the price they pay the issuer and what they collect from investors or from broker-dealers who buy portions of the offering. Once the underwriting agreement is struck, the underwriter bears the risk of being unable to sell the underlying securities, and the cost of holding them on its books until such time in the future that they may be favorably sold. If the instrument is desirable, the underwriter and the securities issuer may choose to enter into an exclusivity agreement. In exchange for a higher price paid upfront to the issuer, or other favorable terms, the issuer may agree to make the underwriter the exclusive agent for the initial sale of the securities instrument. That is, even though third-party buyers might approach the issuer directly to buy, the issuer agrees to sell exclusively through the underwriter. In summary, the securities issuer gets cash up front, access to the contacts and sales channels of the underwriter, and is insulated from the market risk of being unable to sell the securities at a good price. The underwriter gets a profit from the markup, plus possibly an exclusive sales agreement. Also if the securities are priced significantly below market price (as is often the custom), the underwriter also curries favor with powerful end customers by granting them an immediate profit (see flipping), perhaps in a quid pro quo. This practice, which is typically justified as the reward for the underwriter for taking on the market risk, is occasionally criticized as unethical, such as the allegations that Frank Quattrone acted improperly in doling out hot IPO stock during the dot com bubble. In banking, underwriting is the detailed credit analysis preceding the granting of a loan, based on credit information furnished by the borrower; such underwriting falls into several areas: Consumer loan underwriting includes the verification of such items as employment history, salary and financial statements; publicly available information, such as the borrower's credit history, which is detailed in a credit report; and the lender's evaluation of the borrower's credit needs and ability to pay. Examples include mortgage underwriting.
Views: 52807 The Audiopedia
Investment Bankers vs. Business Brokers
 
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Kevin M. Short of Clayton Capital Partners discusses the difference between investment banks and business brokers.
investment banking
 
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What is 'Investment Banking ' Investment banking is a specific division of banking related to the creation of capital for other companies, governments and other entities. Investment banks underwrite new debt and equity securities for all types of corporations, aid in the sale of securities, and help to facilitate mergers and acquisitions, reorganizations and broker trades for both institutions and private investors. Investment banks also provide guidance to issuers regarding the issue and placement of stock Read more: Investment Banking http://www.investopedia.com/terms/i/investment-banking.asp#ixzz4olX0XP8D Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook
Views: 25 sai krishna
If You've Lost Money Investing With National Securities Corporation, You MUST Know This!
 
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NSC is a FINRA registered brokerage firm and investment bank with stockbrokers or financial advisors serving retail investors and other businesses. NSC has underwritten or served as a placement agent for several securities offerings for companies, some of which have lost substantial value including: Miller Energy Resources, Inc. Celator Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Box Ships, Inc. Pacific Energy Development Aqua Metals, Inc.
Views: 51 Silver Law Group
South Korea pushes to foster homegrown, mega-sized Investment Banks
 
02:08
'한국판 골드만삭스', 증권사 초대형IB 탄생 There's been visible push to foster Korea's own home-grown, mega-sized Investment Banks modeled after Goldman Sachs since 2011. At last, the country's top regulator gives the go-ahead to five IBs to expand their businesses beyond brokerage services. Won Jung-hwan sheds light on this development. The Financial Services Commission, the country's top financial regulator, issued a license Monday to Korea Investment and Securities... allowing it to issue promissory notes and short-term corporate financing. There are four other securities firms -- Mirae Asset Daewoo, NH Investment and Securities, KB Securities, and Samsung Securities -- that are also expected to get the go-ahead in the near future. The preparations to nurture giant investment banks in Korea started back in 2011 with a regulatory roadmap to creating a so-called Korean version of Goldman Sachs. But local securities firms didn't yet have the capital. So last year, the financial authorities announced a plan to permit securities firms... that met a threshold of at least 3.6 billion U.S. dollars of equity capital to go into short-term corporate lending. Those with 7.2 billon dollars or more would be allowed to launch management accounts for corporate investors. Those changes put the big five securities companies on their way to becoming homegrown giant investment banks, and with Monday's decision, the first one now has the right to issue notes. But the traditional banking sector wants the decision to be put on hold as it could disrupt the corporate finance industry. The Korean Federation of Banks said the local securities industry lacks an oversight system to manage the issuance of such notes. Short-term corporate financing has traditionally been the province of commercial banks, which are subject to stricter rules and capital requirements. So there is some concern that the creation homegrown, mega-sized investment banks in Korea could destabilize the industry, especially amid a lack of regulation. Won Jung-hwan, Arirang News. Arirang News Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtvnews ------------------------------------------------------------ [Subscribe Arirang Official YouTube] ARIRANG TV: http://www.youtube.com/arirang ARIRANG RADIO: http://www.youtube.com/Music180Arirang ARIRANG NEWS: http://www.youtube.com/arirangnews ARIRANG K-POP: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld ARIRANG ISSUE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangtoday ARIRANG CULTURE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangkorean ------------------------------------------------------------ [Visit Arirang TV Official Pages] Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld Homepage: http://www.arirang.com ------------------------------------------------------------ [Arirang K-Pop] YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangkpop Google+: http://plus.google.com/+arirangworld
Views: 109 ARIRANG NEWS
Investment Banking vs Investment Management | Know the Top Differences
 
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In this video, we will study differences between Investment Banking vs Investment Management and essential skills needed for job. 𝐈𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐁𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐯𝐬 𝐈𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐌𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐃𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Investment banking and Investment management are two of the most sought - after careers for undergraduates in business and finance, offering a professional career with great benefits and bonuses. 𝐖𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐈𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐁𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠? ---------------------------------------------------- Investment banks are financial institutions involved in underwriting, which help companies issue equity and debt securities through IPOs or FPOs, promote mergers (M&A) on both the purchase and sale side of the deal and the restructuring of firms, as well as a wide variety of other tasks. 𝐒𝐤𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐈𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐁𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 --------------------------------------------------------------------- #1 - Outstanding observational skills and a thorough eye. #2 - Advanced mathematical talents and technical skills #3 - Customer leadership skills and negotiation skills 𝐖𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐈𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐌𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭? ----------------------------------------------------------- It helps individual or institutional investors find suitable investment ways to achieve their growth goals. 𝐒𝐤𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐈𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐌𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ #1 - Capability to plan and accomplish long - term financial goals #2 - The capacity to take a global view and simplify investments. #3 - Outstanding numerical skills and wide investment tools knowledge. If you want to know the some other differences on 𝐈𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐁𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐯𝐬 𝐈𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐌𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭, you can go to this link here:- https://www.wallstreetmojo.com/investment-banking-vs-investment-management/
Views: 76 WallStreetMojo
How to Build a Financial Empire: Investment Banks, Insurance, Consumer Loans & Stocks (2003)
 
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Sanford I. "Sandy" Weill (born March 16, 1933) is an American banker, financier and philanthropist. He is a former chief executive and chairman of Citigroup. He served in those positions from 1998 until October 1, 2003, and April 18, 2006, respectively. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0743247264/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0743247264&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=9a4623139d172f3b97151775dc62c2e0 Weill, shortly after graduating from Cornell University, got his first job on Wall Street in 1955 -- as a runner for Bear Stearns. In 1956, Weill became a licensed broker at Bear Stearns. Rather than making phone calls or personal visits to solicit clients, Weill found he was far more comfortable sitting at his desk, poring through companies' financial statements and disclosures made to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. For weeks his only client was his mother, Etta, until Joan persuaded an ex-boyfriend to open a brokerage account. While working at Bear Stearns, Weill was a neighbor of Arthur L. Carter who was working at Lehman Brothers. Together with Roger Berlind and Peter Potoma they would form Carter, Berlind, Potoma & Weill in May 1960. In 1962 the firm became Carter, Berlind & Weill after the New York Stock Exchange brought disciplinary proceedings against Potoma. In 1968, with the departure of Arthur Carter, the firm was renamed Cogan, Berlind, Weill & Levitt (Marshall Cogan, Arthur Levitt), or CBWL jokingly referred to on Wall Street as "Corned Beef With Lettuce". Weill served as the firm's Chairman from 1965 to 1984, a period in which it completed over 15 acquisitions to become the country's second largest securities brokerage firm. The company became CBWL-Hayden, Stone, Inc. in 1970; Hayden Stone, Inc. in 1972; Shearson Hayden Stone in 1974, when it merged with Shearson Hammill & Co.; and Shearson Loeb Rhoades in 1979, when it merged with Loeb, Rhoades, Hornblower & Co. With capital totaling $250 million, Shearson Loeb Rhoades trailed only Merrill Lynch as the securities brokerage industry's largest firm. In 1981, Weill sold Shearson Loeb Rhoades to American Express for about $930 million in stock. (Sources differ on the precise figure.) In 1982, he founded the National Academy Foundation with the Academy of Finance to educate students that would graduate from High School. Weill began serving as president of American Express Co. in 1983 and as chairman and CEO of American Express's insurance subsidiary, Fireman's Fund Insurance Company, in 1984. Weill was succeeded by his protégé, Peter A. Cohen, who became the youngest head of a Wall Street firm. While at American Express, Weill began grooming his newest protégé, Jamie Dimon, the future CEO of JPMorgan Chase. Increasing tensions between Weill and the chairman of American Express, James D. Robinson III, led Weill to resign in August 1985 at age 52. After a failed attempt to become the CEO of BankAmerica Corp. (and "take over" Merrill Lynch, according to a Jamie Dimon interview in 2002), he set his sights a little lower and persuaded Minneapolis-based Control Data Corporation to spin off a troubled subsidiary, Commercial Credit, a consumer finance company. In 1986, with $7 million of his own money invested in the company, Weill took over as CEO of Commercial Credit. After a round of deep layoffs and reorganization, the company completed a successful IPO. In 1987, he acquired Gulf Insurance. The next year, he paid $1.5 billion for Primerica, the parent company of Smith Barney and the A. L. Williams insurance company. In 1989 he acquired Drexel Burnham Lambert's retail brokerage outlets. In 1992, he paid $722 million to buy a 27 percent share of Travelers Insurance, which had gotten into trouble because of bad real estate investments. In 1993 he reacquired his old Shearson brokerage (now Shearson Lehman) from American Express for $1.2 billion. By the end of the year, he had completely taken over Travelers Corp in a $4 billion stock deal and officially began calling his corporation Travelers Group Inc. In 1996 he added to his holdings, at a cost of $4 billion, the property and casualty operations of Aetna Life & Casualty. In September 1997 Weill acquired Salomon Inc., the parent company of Salomon Brothers Inc. for over $9 billion in stock. In April 1998, Travelers Group announced an agreement to undertake the $76 billion merger between Travelers and Citicorp, and the merger was completed on October 8, 1998. The possibility remained that the merger would run into problems connected with federal law. Ever since the Glass--Steagall Act, banking and insurance businesses had been kept separate. Weill and John S. Reed bet that Congress would soon pass legislation overturning those regulations, which Weill, Reed and a number of businesspeople considered not in their interest. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Weill
Views: 4493 The Film Archives
How Should Insider Trading, Securities & the Stock Market Be Regulated? (1987)
 
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David Sturtevant Ruder (born May 25, 1929) is the William W. Gurley Memorial Professor of Law Emeritus at Northwestern University School of Law, where he has served on the faculty since 1961, and where he served as Dean from 1977 to 1985. He served as chairman of U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission from 1987 to 1989, and later practiced with the Chicago-based law firm Baker & McKenzie. He served as Chairman of the Mutual Fund Directors Forum, an organization providing education to independent directors of mutual funds,[1] from 2002–2010 and is currently the organization's Chairman Emeritus.[2] Ruder is a 1951 graduate of Williams College (B.A. cum laude) and a 1957 graduate of the University of Wisconsin Law School (J.D., with honors). He received an honorary Doctor of Laws in 2002 from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.[3] On May 14, 2008, Ruder, together with two other former SEC Chairmen, William Donaldson and Arthur Levitt, endorsed Barack Obama's candidacy for President http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Ruder The Glass–Steagall separation of commercial and investment banking was in four sections of the 1933 Banking Act (sections 16, 20, 21, and 32).[1] The Banking Act of 1935 clarified the 1933 legislation and resolved inconsistencies in it. Together, they prevented commercial Federal Reserve member banks from: dealing in non-governmental securities for customers investing in non-investment grade securities for themselves underwriting or distributing non-governmental securities affiliating (or sharing employees) with companies involved in such activities Conversely, Glass-Steagall prevented securities firms and investment banks from taking deposits. The law gave banks one year after the law was passed on June 16, 1933 to decide whether they would be a commercial bank or an investment bank. Only 10 percent of a commercial bank's income could stem from securities. One exception to this rule was that commercial banks could underwrite government issued bonds. There were several “loopholes” that regulators and financial firms were able to exploit during the lifetime of Glass-Steagall restrictions. Aside from the Section 21 prohibition on securities firms taking deposits, neither savings and loans nor state charted banks that did not belong to the Federal Reserve System were restricted by Glass-Steagall. Glass-Steagall also did not prevent securities firms from owning such institutions. S&Ls and securities firms took advantage of these loopholes starting in the 1960s to create products and affiliated companies that chipped away at commercial banks' deposit and lending businesses. While permitting affiliations between securities firms and companies other than Federal Reserve member banks, Glass-Steagall distinguished between what a Federal Reserve member bank could do directly and what an affiliate could do. Whereas a Federal Reserve member bank could not buy, sell, underwrite, or deal in any security except as specifically permitted by Section 16, such a bank could affiliate with a company so long as that company was not “engaged principally” in such activities. Starting in 1987, the Federal Reserve Board interpreted this to mean a member bank could affiliate with a securities firm so long as that firm was not “engaged principally” in securities activities prohibited for a bank by Section 16. By the time the GLBA repealed the Glass-Steagall affiliation restrictions, the Federal Reserve Board had interpreted this “loophole” in those restrictions to mean a banking company (Citigroup, as owner of Citibank) could acquire one of the world’s largest securities firms (Salomon Smith Barney), as described in the article Glass–Steagall: decline. By defining commercial banks as banks that take in deposits and make loans and investment banks as banks that underwrite and deal with securities the Glass Steagall act explained the separation of banks by stating that commercial banks could not deal with securities and investment banks could not own commercial banks or have close connections with them. With the exception of commercial banks being allowed to underwrite government issued bonds, commercial banks could only have ten percent of their income come from securities. The Glass Steagall Legislation page specifies that only Federal Reserve member banks were affected by the provisions which according to secondary sources the act “applied direct prohibitions to the activities of certain commercial banks. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass-Steagall_Act
Views: 425 The Film Archives
What is a clearing house? - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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Clearing houses play in important role in the financial markets. But what exactly are they and what do they do? Tim Bennett explains.
Views: 139103 MoneyWeek
Goldman Sachs Cuts CEO Salary By 35% (GS)
 
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Goldman Sachs (NYSE:GS) has reportedly reduced its CEO's, Lloyd Blankfein, salary by 35% to $12.4 million. The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc., a bank holding company, is a global investment banking and securities firm specializing in investment banking, trading and principal investments, asset management and securities services. The Company provides services to corporations, financial institutions, governments, and high-net worth individuals. SmarTrend alerted subscribers to take profits in Goldman Sachs Group on April 05, 2012 at $119.11, since then the stock fell 2.6%. We are now watching for any positive developments that could result in a new uptrend signal.
Views: 213 FinancialNewsOnline
What is Investment Banking in HINDI || Investment Banker ?| Highest Paying Jobs in India | World
 
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Part 2 video link is here: https://youtu.be/NO1ckzEhroM What is Investment Banking in HINDI || Investment Banker ?| Highest Paid Jobs in India | World.  If you want to know about Investment Banking then this video is for you in this video we have explained what is Investment Banking and Why it is called the Highest Paid Career in India as well as in the World. #creativethinkable Your Quarries: 1) What's investment banking in Hindi 2) Career in Investment Banking 2019 3) is Investment Banking good career for you? 4) investment banking highest paid job 5) Investment Banking course 6) complete Procedure of Investment Banking in (2019) An investment bank is a financial servicescompany or corporate division that engages in advisory-based financial transactions on behalf of individuals, corporations, and governments. Traditionally associated with corporate finance, such a bank might assist in raising financial capital by underwriting or acting as the client's agent in the issuance of securities. An investment bank may also assist companies involved in mergers and acquisitions (M&A) and provide ancillary services such as market making, trading of derivatives and equity securities, and FICC services (fixed income instruments, currencies, and commodities). Most investment banks maintain prime brokerageand asset management departments in conjunction with their investment researchbusinesses. As an industry it is broken up into the Bulge Bracket (upper tier), Middle Market(mid-level businesses), and boutique market(specialized businesses). #investmentbanking #highestpayingjob #investmentbankingcareer
Views: 34 Creative Thinkable
Investment Bankers -- Business Funding Tip
 
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http://www.nchinc.com/ Investment Bankers Investment bankers help companies raise money by issuing and selling securities in the primary market. They lend their expertise to a company to help it determine the best strategy and the best place to raise either debt or equity capital. Investment bankers also prepare all the necessary documents to accurately present the value proposition for funding. Good investment banker firms prepare a Private Placement Memorandum which is a legal document designed to protect both sides from making a bad investment. They also ensure that all government regulations have been followed in the raising of any capital. Typically, entrepreneurs that go it alone, raise capital in ways that violate SEC and NASD rules they didn't even know existed. Hiring a good investment banker can be one of the smartest decisions an entrepreneur can make. To learn more about investment bankers, contact a Nevada Corporate Headquarters representative today at 1-800-508-1729.
Financial vs  Corporate Buyers
 
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What is Investment Banking Investment banking is a specific division of banking related to the creation of capital for other companies, governments and other entities. Investment banks underwrite new debt and equity securities for all types of corporations, aid in the sale of securities, and help to facilitate mergers and acquisitions, reorganizations and broker trades for both institutions and private investors. Investment banks also provide guidance to issuers regarding the issue and placement of stock. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_H8SEcfTAXlt5mHfRTDdNoivaUagZC87
Views: 54 The Course
Investment Banking Operations: Financial Derivatives and Options Trading - Career (1998)
 
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Investment banking has changed over the years, beginning as a partnership form focused on underwriting security issuance (initial public offerings and secondary offerings), brokerage, and mergers and acquisitions, and evolving into a "full-service" range including sell-side research, proprietary trading, and investment management. In the modern 21st century, the SEC filings of the major independent investment banks such as Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley reflect three product segments: (1) investment banking (fees for M&A advisory services and securities underwriting); (2) asset management (fees for sponsored investment funds), and (3) trading and principal investments (broker-dealer activities including proprietary trading ("dealer" transactions) and brokerage trading ("broker" transactions)).[3] In the United States, commercial banking and investment banking were separated by the Glass--Steagall Act, which was repealed in 1999. The repeal led to more "universal banks" offering an even greater range of services. Many large commercial banks have therefore developed investment banking divisions through acquisitions and hiring. Notable large banks with significant investment banks include JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Barclays, and Wells Fargo. After the financial crisis of 2007--2008 and the subsequent passage of the Dodd--Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, regulations have limited certain investment banking operations, notably with the Volcker Rule's restrictions on proprietary trading.[2] The traditional service of underwriting security issues has declined as a percentage of revenue. As far back as 1960, 70% of Merrill Lynch's revenue was derived from transaction commissions while "traditional investment banking" services accounted for 5%. However, Merrill Lynch was a relatively "retail-focused" firm with a large brokerage network. Corporate finance is the traditional aspect of investment banks which also involves helping customers raise funds in capital markets and giving advice on mergers and acquisitions (M&A). This may involve subscribing investors to a security issuance, coordinating with bidders, or negotiating with a merger target. Another term for the investment banking division is corporate finance, and its advisory group is often termed "mergers and acquisitions". A pitch book of financial information is generated to market the bank to a potential M&A client; if the pitch is successful, the bank arranges the deal for the client. The investment banking division (IBD) is generally divided into industry coverage and product coverage groups. Industry coverage groups focus on a specific industry -- such as healthcare, public finance (governments), FIG (financial institutions group), industrials, TMT (technology, media, and telecommunication) -- and maintains relationships with corporations within the industry to bring in business for the bank. Product coverage groups focus on financial products -- such as mergers and acquisitions, leveraged finance, public finance, asset finance and leasing, structured finance, restructuring, equity, and high-grade debt -- and generally work and collaborate with industry groups on the more intricate and specialized needs of a client. The Wall Street Journal, in partnership with Dealogic, publishes figures on investment banking revenue such as M&A in its Investment Banking Scorecard. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Investment_banking
Views: 6221 The Film Archives
What is an Investment Bank?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Investment Bank” An individual or institution which acts as an underwriter or agent for corporations and municipalities issuing securities. Most also maintain broker/dealer operations, maintain markets for previously issued securities, and offer advisory services to investors. Investment banks also have a large role in facilitating mergers and acquisitions, private equity placements and corporate restructuring. Unlike traditional banks, investment banks do not accept deposits from and provide loans to individuals. The advisory divisions of investment banks are paid a fee for their services, while the trading divisions experience profit or loss based on their market performance. Professionals who work for investment banks may have careers as financial advisers, traders or salespeople. An investment banker career can be very lucrative, but it typically comes with long hours and significant stress. Because investment banks have external clients but also trade their own accounts, a conflict of interest can occur if the advisory and trading divisions don’t maintain their independence. Investment banks’ clients include corporations, pension funds, other financial institutions, governments and hedge funds. Size is an asset for investment banks. The more connections the bank has within the market, the more likely it is to profit by matching buyers and sellers, especially for unique transactions. The largest investment banks have clients around the globe. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 528567 Khan Academy
Oversight of Wall Street: Financial Services & High Risk Securities (2010)
 
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Writing reports or notes expressing opinions is always a part of "sell-side" (brokerage) analyst job and is often not required for "buy-side" (investment firms) analysts. Traditionally, analysts use fundamental analysis principles but technical chart analysis and tactical evaluation of the market environment are also routine. Often at the end of the assessment of analyzed securities, an analyst would provide a rating recommending an investment action, e.g. to buy, sell, or hold the security. The analysts obtain information by studying public records and filings by the company, as well as by participating in public conference calls where they can ask direct questions to the management. Additional information can be also received in small group or one-on-one meetings with senior members of management teams. However, in many markets such information gathering became difficult and potentially illegal due to legislative changes brought upon by corporate scandals in the early 2000s. One example is Regulation FD (Fair Disclosure) in the United States. Many other developed countries also adopted similar rules. Financial analysts are often employed by mutual and pension funds, hedge funds, securities firms, banks, investment banks, insurance companies, and other businesses, helping these companies or their clients make investment decisions. Financial analysts employed in commercial lending perform "balance sheet analysis," examining the audited financial statements and corollary data in order to assess lending risks. In a stock brokerage house or in an investment bank, they read company financial statements and analyze commodity prices, sales, costs, expenses, and tax rates in order to determine a company's value and project future earnings. In any of these various institutions, the analyst often meets with company officials to gain a better insight into a company's prospects and to determine the company's managerial effectiveness. Usually, financial analysts study an entire industry, assessing current trends in business practices, products, and industry competition. They must keep abreast of new regulations or policies that may affect the industry, as well as monitor the economy to determine its effect on earnings. Financial analysts use spreadsheet and statistical software packages to analyze financial data, spot trends, and develop forecasts; see Financial modeling. On the basis of their results, they write reports and make presentations, usually making recommendations to buy or sell a particular investment or security. Senior analysts may actually make the decision to buy or sell for the company or client if they are the ones responsible for managing the assets. Other analysts use the data to measure the financial risks associated with making a particular investment decision. Financial analysts in investment banking departments of securities or banking firms often work in teams, analyzing the future prospects of companies that want to sell shares to the public for the first time. They also ensure that the forms and written materials necessary for compliance with Securities and Exchange Commission regulations are accurate and complete. They may make presentations to prospective investors about the merits of investing in the new company. Financial analysts also work in mergers and acquisitions departments, preparing analyses on the costs and benefits of a proposed merger or takeover. There are buy-side analysts and sell-side analysts. Some financial analysts collect industry data (mainly balance sheet, income statement and capital adequacy in banking sector), merger and acquisition history and financial news for their clients. They normally standardize the different companies data to look uniform and facilitate their clients to do peer analysis. Their main objective is to enable their clients to make better decisions about the investment across different regions. They also provide the abundance of financial ratios calculated from the data that they gather from the financial statements that help clients to read the bottom line of the company. Many people mix up this with the data entry job but actually its far away from just data entry. Some financial analysts, called ratings analysts (who are often employees of ratings agencies), evaluate the ability of companies or governments that issue bonds to repay their debt. On the basis of their evaluation, a management team assigns a rating to a company's or government's bonds. Other financial analysts perform budget, cost, and credit analysis as part of their responsibilities. Analyst performance is ranked by a range of services such as StarMine owned by Thomson Reuters or Institutional Investor magazine. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financial_analyst
Views: 140 Way Back
The four different types of bonds
 
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What is Investment Banking Investment banking is a specific division of banking related to the creation of capital for other companies, governments and other entities. Investment banks underwrite new debt and equity securities for all types of corporations, aid in the sale of securities, and help to facilitate mergers and acquisitions, reorganizations and broker trades for both institutions and private investors. Investment banks also provide guidance to issuers regarding the issue and placement of stock. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_H8SEcfTAXlt5mHfRTDdNoivaUagZC87
Views: 119 The Course
Equity vs. debt | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Debt vs. Equity. Market Capitalization, Asset Value, and Enterprise Value. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/chapter-7-bankruptcy-liquidation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/more-on-ipos?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: This is an old set of videos, but if you put up with Sal's messy handwriting (it has since improved) and spotty sound, there is a lot to be learned here. In particular, this tutorial walks through starting, financing and taking public a company (and even talks about what happens if it has trouble paying its debts). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 363828 Khan Academy
Investment Banking - Life as an Investment Banker. SHOCKING TRUTH
 
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Investment banking is about money, lifestyle, social status and power? WRONG. It's a very destructive lifestyle. Many investment bankers are addicted to drugs and alcohol. A Day in the life of an investment banking analyst and associate is not glamorous. Students go into investment banking because they want to make money, or they want to impress their friends and family. They look for external means of validation (money) to reinforce and provide what should come from inside. Money doesn't replace an internal emptiness or lack of confidence. Working in corporate finance & investment banking is not even as good these days as it was 10 years ago. Yes, you'll work with private equity firms and hedge funds, but there are many ways to make money. And graduating from an Ivy League University to then be disrespected by Senior Bankers is NOT a good decision move. Being an analyst and associate is NOT a good career choice, except it doesn't provide you with good exit opportunities. You're better off focusing on something that you're passionate about and building that up slowly. But I know that people want to make quick money. That's the exact reason why I went into Investment banking and became an investment banker. Introduction to Investment Banking 365 Careers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PkN15TtFnc A Day in the Life of a Goldman Sachs Analyst Afzal Hussein https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4luue9VZag Investment Banking: What do they do? ENGINEERED TRUTH https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbMh6KRLz9U Learn what to expect as an investment banking analyst and investment banking associate. Investment Banking Salary - Analysts | How Much First Year Analysts Earn (Base) by Afzal Hussein https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZX6dz61s-po #investmentbanking #investmentbanker
Views: 11309 BestStockStrategy