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Articles (a, an, the) - Lesson 1 - 7 Rules For Using Articles Correctly - English Grammar
 
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In this lesson, learn the 7 rules for using articles in English correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I will teach you the seven rules that you need to know for using articles in English correctly. Articles are the words ‘a’, ‘an’, and ‘the’. There is a final quiz at the end of the lesson for you to test your understanding. OK, the first rule is about where to use ‘a’ and where to use ‘an’. So rule number one is use ‘a’ before a consonant sound, and ‘an’ before a vowel sound. So in all of these words – you see that they start with a consonant sound. Cat starts with /k/, dog starts with /d/, boy with /b/, girl with /g/, house with /h/ and tree with /t/. So we say ‘a cat’, ‘a dog’, ‘a boy’, ‘a girl’, ‘a house’, ‘a tree’ etc. Notice that in natural speech, we don’t say ‘a’, we say ‘uh’ – like ‘a cat’. In this next set of words, you see that, they all start with a vowel sound – apple starts with /ae/, engineer starts with /e/, ice-cream with /ai/, old with /o/, umbrella with /uh/. So we say ‘an apple’, ‘an engineer’, ‘an ice-cream cone’, ‘an old womman’, ‘an umbrella’ and so on. In speech, we don’t say ‘an’, we say /ən/. Let’s do a small exercise. You see ten items on the screen. For each one, I want you to say if you would use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before it. Stop the video, think about it, then play the video again and check. OK here are the answers. Did you get them all right? I want to focus on items number seven to ten because these are a little tricky. Number seven is ‘a university’ because even though ‘university’ starts with the letter ‘u’ the first sound of the word is not a vowel sound. We don’t say /ooniversity/. We say /yoo-nə- vər-si-ty/ so that first sound is a /y/ sound, which a consonant sound, so we say ‘a university.’ Number eight is similar. The word ‘European’ starts with a /y/ sound, so ‘a European tour.’ In number nine, the spelling has an ‘h’ at the start but that ‘h’ is silent. We don’t say /hau-ər/, we say /au-ər/. The first sound is an /au/ sound which is a vowel sound, so this is ‘an hour’. In the same way, in number ten, we say MA. ‘M’ starts with an /e/ sound which is again a vowel sound, so ‘an MA in English’. OK let’s move on to rule number two: Use ‘a’ and ‘an’ ONLY with singular, countable nouns. We say that a noun is countable if we can count it – one, two, three, four etc. All of these words on the screen are countable. We can say one elephant, three cars, ten teachers, five hundred onions and so on. Now if you talk about one person or thing, like one elephant or one car, then that’s called a singular noun and if you say ten teachers or five hundred onions, those are called plural nouns. Uncountable nouns cannot be counted in this way. Nouns like water, sugar, milk, love, anger, knowledge are some examples. If you think about it, you cannot say “I drank four waters” or “I want eight milks”. To a person, you can say “I love you” but you can’t say “I have five loves for you” – that doesn’t make any sense. So these are all uncountable. Alright, so the rule is - you can only use ‘a’ and ‘an’ if you’re talking about one person or one thing. Let’s do another quick exercise. Here are ten items again. This time, you see ‘a’ or ‘an’ before the nouns, but some of these are wrong. They should NOT have ‘a’ or ‘an’ before them. Stop the video, identify the mistakes, then play the video again and check. OK, here are the answers. Number three is wrong because ‘shirts’ is a plural and you cannot use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before a plural noun. Number five is wrong because ‘happiness’ is uncountable, so again, ‘a’ or ‘an’ cannot be used there. The same goes for number six – water is uncountable. Number nine is wrong because ‘doctors’ is a plural – you can say ‘a doctor’ but not ‘a doctors’. And finally, in number ten, advice is an uncountable noun – so you cannot ask for ‘an advice’. Now a quick note here: the article ‘the’ can be used with all kinds of nouns – singular or plural countable nouns, and uncountable nouns. OK, so let’s now talk about how to choose between ‘a’ or ‘an’ and ‘the’. Here’s rule number three: Use ‘a’ or ‘an’ to talk about a person or thing unknown to your listener. And use ‘the’ to talk about a person or thing known to your listener. For example, “My sister has two computers: a PC and a laptop. The PC is quite old but the laptop is brand new.” I say ‘a PC’ and ‘a laptop’ because that’s the first time I’m mentioning the two computers. That is, until this point, they are unknown to you, the listener.
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A, AN, THE - Articles in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ 'I saw A movie last night' or 'I saw THE movie last night'? A, AN, and THE are called articles and they can be very confusing. Learn exactly when and how to use articles in English in this important grammar lesson! http://www.engvid.com/a-an-the-articles-in-english/
Grammar: Using THE with common and abstract nouns
 
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An abstract noun is a word that means a general concept or idea, like "life" or "friendship". We can use "the" with common nouns, as in "the sky is blue". But can we use "the" with abstract nouns? For example, would you say "happiness is important" or "the happiness is important"? If you are not sure, watch this lesson to learn when to use "the" with general and abstract nouns. Don't forget to take the quiz afterwards to test your understanding! http://www.engvid.com/grammar-the-common-abstract-nouns/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. Many English learners have trouble deciding when to use "the" or no "the", so I understand that problem, I know it can be a little bit confusing, but I believe that by the end of this lesson, you're going to find it much easier. Okay? So let's start with a little quiz first to see where you stand regarding that word "the". So, let's look at this first example. Should you say: "Life is beautiful." or "The life is beautiful."? Okay. Think about it. Decide. Another one: "Friendship is precious." or "The friendship is precious."? Which one is right? Think for yourself. We'll do one more, and then I'll give you the answers. "Happiness is important." or "The happiness is important."? Which one is correct? Do you know? How do you know? How do you decide which one is right? I'll tell you. When we're talking about something which is a general concept or idea, then we do not use "the". Okay? For example, let's take the first one. "Life is beautiful." Now, life is a general concept, so we do not need "the". So, this is the correct answer. All right? Not this. "Life is beautiful." Because life is a general idea, a general concept. Okay? We're not talking about anything specific. If we say: "The life of wise people is beautiful." that is something specific, and then we would be correct to say: "The life". Okay? But if we're just talking in general, then no "the". Let's look at the next example. "Friendship is precious." Again, friendship is a general idea or a general concept, so this is correct. Okay? In this example, this one was wrong. But if I said, for example: "The friendship between those two children is precious." then that would be fine, because now I'm specifying which friendship. Right? The friendship between those two children, so then it becomes specific, and then we would use "the". But in this example, this is correct. Okay? Just like this was, and this is wrong, because this is a general idea. Okay? Next one: "Happiness is important." By now you know, again, happiness is a general idea, a general concept, so this is correct. In this example, it would be wrong to say: "The happiness", because: The happiness of what? So, if we say: "The happiness of my family is important." that's fine. That's very good. That would be a perfect sentence. But in this case, we cannot say: "The happiness is important." because we didn't specify which happiness. Okay? So, in this case, that's wrong, and this is correct. Okay? Now, the same principle applies to these. See if you can figure it out. Okay? "I want to make money." or "I want to make the money."? Which one do you think is right? Are we speaking in general, or are we speaking specifically? Well, we are speaking in general right now, so this is correct, because we're just talking about money; we didn't say which money. I want to make money. Right? General idea. If I said, for example: "I want to make the money I need to pay my rent." that's specific, so then I could say: "the money", because I'm explaining after that which money. Okay? But in this example, no. Next one: "She wants to lose weight." or "She wants to lose the weight."? Is it general or is it specific? What do you think? It's still general. Good. By now you're getting really smart. "She wants to lose weight." is a general term. Right? We're just talking about weight in general; not any specific weight. But if I say: "She wants to lose the weight she put on during the holidays." that's specific, and then I need "the". Okay? But not in this example. So, last one here: "He needs to earn respect." or do we say: "He needs to earn the respect."? Is it general or is it specific? By now you know, you'll really know. It's general. Very good. Okay? Because we didn't talk about any specific respect; we're talking about respect in general. So: "He needs to earn respect." But if this was being used, it would be something like: "He needs to earn the respect of his peers." Peers are people your age. Okay? Or: "He needs to earn the respect of his employees." for example, or "of his parents". Then it becomes specific. Which respect? The respect of his parents, the respect of his employees. All right? So, if it was specific, then we could say "the", but when we're just talking in general, we don't need "the". "Life is beautiful.", "Friendship is precious.", "Happiness is important.", "I want to make money.", "She wants to lose weight.", "He needs to earn respect."
Rules of war (in a nutshell)
 
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Yes, even wars have laws. To find out more, visit http://therulesofwar.org ******** Rules of War in a Nutshell - script Since the beginning, humans have resorted to violence as a way to settle disagreements. Yet through the ages, people from around the world have tried to limit the brutality of war. It was this humanitarian spirit that led to the First Geneva Convention of 1864,and to the birth of modern International Humanitarian Law. Setting the basic limits on how wars can be fought, these universal laws of war protect those not fighting, as well as those no longer able to. To do this, a distinction must always be made between who or what may be attacked, and who or what must be spared and protected. - CIVILIANS - Most importantly, civilians can never be targeted. To do so is a war crime. “When they drove into our village, they shouted that they were going to kill everyone. I was so scared, I ran to hide in the bush. I heard my mother screaming. I thought I would never see her again.” Every possible care must be taken to avoid harming civilians or destroying things essential for their survival. They have a right to receive the help they need. - DETAINEES - “The conditions prisoners lived in never used to bother me. People like him were the reason my brother was dead. He was the enemy and was nothing to me. But then I realized that behind bars, he was out of action and no longer a threat to me or my family.” The laws of war prohibit torture and other ill-treatment of detainees, whatever their past. They must be given food and water and allowed to communicate with loved ones. This preserves their dignity and keeps them alive. - SICK & WOUNDED - Medical workers save lives, sometimes in the most dangerous conditions. “Several fighters from both sides had been critically wounded in a fierce battle and we were taking them to the closest hospital. At a checkpoint, a soldier threatened us, demanding that we only treat his men. Time was running out and I was afraid they were all going to die.” Medical workers must always be allowed to do their job and the Red Cross or Red Crescent must not be attacked. The sick or wounded have a right to be cared for, regardless of whose side they are on. - LIMITS TO WARFARE - Advances in weapons technology has meant that the rules of war have also had to adapt. Because some weapons and methods of warfare don't distinguish between fighters and civilians, limits on their use have been agreed. In the future, wars may be fought with fully autonomous robots. But will such robots ever have the ability to distinguish between a military target and someone who must never be attacked? No matter how sophisticated weapons become it is essential that they are in line with the rules of war. International Humanitarian Law is all about making choices that preserve a minimum of human dignity in times of war, and makes sure that living together again is possible once the last bullet has been shot.
006 - a/an vs. the (Rule 1) English Articles - Beginning English Lesson - Basic English Grammar
 
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http://www.englishanyone.com/power-learning/ Learn to express yourself confidently in fluent English and sound like a native speaker with our FREE Power Learning video course! Learn basic English grammar! Ты поняла разницу между 'a' и 'the'? With our latest video series, EnglishAnyone.com is attempting to pull off the seemingly impossible: we're going to teach English, to absolute beginners with no English speaking experience, IN English! This unique, revolutionary series throws out the usual English teaching conventions, parts with the traditional order in which grammar is taught and makes English accessible to anyone who wants to learn! For teachers curious to see how this is possible, and for students of any ability level who want to improve their English, welcome to English Anyone! Lesson 6 - Indefinite & Definite Articles Understand English articles and learn when to use a, an and the. Uncountable nouns require no article: water, milk, rice, tea Countable nouns (and adjectives modifying nouns) that begin with consonants require "a": a pen, a book, a car, a cat Countable nouns (and adjectives modifying nouns) that begin with a vowel require "an": an apple, an egg, an umbrella, an octopus an = a "The" is used after a noun is introduced with "a" or "an". a cat. The cat is small. "The" is also used when describing something that both the speaker and the listener know about. I went to the park yesterday (the park both people usually go to). "The" is also used when there can only be one thing. He is the best. She is the tallest. Don't use "the" before: 1. the names of cities, towns, or states: Kyoto, Chicago, Houston 2. the names of streets: Madison Ave., King St. 3. the names of lakes and bays: Lake Michigan, Lake Ontario 4. the names of mountains: Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Fuji 5. the names of continents: Antarctica, South America 6. the names of islands: Kodiak Island, Oahu 7. the names of countries: Spain, Canada, Thailand (except for the Netherlands, the Bahamas, the United States, etc.) Do use "the" before: 1. names of rivers, oceans and seas: the Amazon, the Atlantic, the Red Sea 2. specific points on the Earth: the Prime Meridian, the South Pole, the Equator 3. geographical areas: the West Bank, the East Indies 4. deserts, forests, gulfs, and peninsulas: the Gobi Desert, the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Forest, the Texas Panhandle For more tips, lessons and videos, and to discover the 7 secrets to becoming a confident, fluent English speaker easily and automatically, visit us at http://www.englishanyone.com/.
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3 Rules to Avoid Violating Fair Use on YouTube
 
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Even if the copyrighted material you use in your YouTube videos falls under Fair Use, you can still get into a lot of copyright issues and difficulties. The only entity that can determine if your use of copyrighted material falls under "Fair Use" or not is a court of law. YouTube doesn't make any judgement calls on fair use. They only give copyright holders the ability to find their material on YouTube through Content ID and determine what they want to do with the video that's using their material. Here's a few rules to help you avoid violating fair use and running into copyright problems on YouTube. Fair Use: A guide to citations & avoiding plagiarism on the web http://bit.ly/1x22S2i US Copyright Law in the USA http://1.usa.gov/1lEGneZ Kenneth Kunckle Law http://bit.ly/1eD6RVR Copyright on YouTube http://bit.ly/1qV2lqk YouTube's new Design Update that Focuses on Playlist Curation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1sV30Ov158 Video Creators on Patreon http://www.patreon.com/videocreators Gaming Channels: Top YouTube Strategies for Growth http://bit.ly/1A0kIik Learn how to improve your video quality to attract more views and subscribers: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvxDZJe1lbaYHY8VxsOdkcNi1mkF6ozpp On Video Creators we discuss how to leverage YouTube as a social platform and use it to build an audience, spread our message, and change lives. If you're a YouTuber or an online video creator, we'd love to have you subscribe and join us! SUBSCRIBE! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=videocreatorstv FREE EBOOK: "The Secret to Building your YouTube Audience" http://videocreators.com/resources/secret-building-youtube-audience/ SUPPORT: Many bonus perks for those who become a patron of Video Creators! http://www.patreon.com/videocreators THERE'S MORE GOODNESS FOR YOU HERE YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/videocreatorstv Website: http://videocreators.com iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/videocreators.com-youtube/id649667452 T-Shirts: http://videocreators.com/resources/video-creators-t-shirts/ SCHEDULE -- Tuesdays: YouTube and Online Video News -- http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvxDZJe1lbabcEjD8qZWIDv-pyBXz1snW -- Wednesdays: YouTube Tips, Tricks, Advice and Ideas -- http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvxDZJe1lbaaEfLsIhbhQpoJRCcAyi4MC -- Thursdays: Questions & Answers -- http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvxDZJe1lbabPKJuXL3PTeP3fPQrEaGSz -- Monthly: Google+ Hangouts -- http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvxDZJe1lbabxmw1Hrktw1BOE64QgNd_G LET'S CONNECT! VideoCreatorTV's accounts -- http://www.facebook.com/videocreators -- http://www.google.com/+videocreators -- http://videocreators.tumblr.com -- http://www.pinterest.com/videocreators/ -- http://www.linkedin.com/company/video-creators Tim Schmoyer's personal accounts -- http://www.google.com/+timschmoyer -- http://www.facebook.com/timschmoyer -- http://twitter.com/timschmoyer -- http://instagram.com/timschmoyer OTHER CHANNELS I'M A PART OF ReelSEO: http://www.youtube.com/reelseo Family Vlogs: http://www.youtube.com/schmovies
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English Grammar: The Prepositions ON, AT, IN, BY
 
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English for Beginners: Prepositions are short words that help us express location, time, and other relationships between people and things. Some examples of prepositions are: on, at, in, and by. Do you know how to use them? For example, do we say, "I am on a taxi" or "in a taxi"? Do you like to travel "in a plane" or "by plane"? After watching this simple but useful lesson, you will know exactly which preposition to use in any situation. Test yourself with our quiz: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-prepositions-on-at-in-by/ TRANSCRIPT I'm having a hard time reading on the train right now. Unh. Hold on. I'll start the lesson. Hi. James from engVid. Sorry, I was on the train. I want to teach you a lesson about four basic prepositions that we use in English that sometimes get confused, and I understand why, so I'll keep it basic. But because it's basic, it's going to be 80% correct. That's a good thing, that means you can go to the website and learn more from other lessons we have. But just know that sometimes there'll be exceptions, and I may not cover it here today. I'll even give you two exceptions to help you, but why waste time? Let's go to the board. Here's Mr. E. You'll notice he has a calendar, he has a clock, and: "You are here"? Oh, here. "Here" is a location. We're here right now, doing a lesson. That's the location: engVid. Let's go to the board and do the rest of the lesson, shall we? Here's: "at", "on", "in", and "by". "At". I love it because it's very specific, so you always know where you are, exactly. Problem: For transportation, "at" doesn't have anything. Hmm. So let's go to the next one. Let's go to "on". On. "On" is used for, let's say, large vehicles or large ways of travelling, such as buses... Sorry. Trains, buses, planes, and boats. I'll come back to boat in a second; it's an exception. On the train, on the bus, and on the plane, unless you're Bill Gates, Donald Trump, or me-I'm not in that list-you don't have your own train, plane, or bus, so you usually share it with a bunch of people or a few people. It's large. So we say: "You're on the bus", because it covers a big area, so there are many people sitting in that area. When I get to location, you'll see what I mean. Boat is a small exception. For many people in the world, they have their own boats because maybe they do fishing, or rowing, which is a type of boat that you go by yourself. In that situation, you can use "in". So, if the boat is small enough, say: "in": "I'm in a boat right now." But if it's a big boat, you have to say: "I'm on a boat." Another exception for the "on" rule is bicycle. You're always "on" a bicycle. I know, I said big vehicles, but remember: a bicycle is small, and it doesn't really have a motor or an engine, so we kind of give it its own thing, because you have to sit on the bicycle, and you can never really be in a bicycle. Is that good? Now, let's go to "in". "In" is funny because there are only two things for "in". "In" we use for car and taxi. The easy way to think about it is usually you own your own car; it doesn't belong to a group of people. People just don't get on your car every time you stop it, they go in and say: "Take me somewhere." And a taxi, well, when you're in a taxi, it is kind of your car. You pay the driver and you keep the car. So, this is one of those few cases where, because it belongs to me, I am in my car or I am in the taxi, because the taxi belongs to me as long as I pay the money. It's one of these funny exceptions. I don't know why, because you can put more people in a car, but I guess because you can actually own this transportation, it's yours. Think of it like the small boat. The small boat, one person is in it, you can be inside of it. All right? Cool. The last one we're going to do is "by". This is how you get there. So, "by" is different. When we talk about "in" and "on", you are... We are talking about how you are in the vehicle. Are you sitting on the bicycle? I can see you on it? You know, a boat is on water. But "by" just means: How did you get here? So, when someone responds to you with: "By car", "by plane", they're telling you how they got here. Not if they're in the plane, or on the plane. They are just... That's how they got there. So, how did I get here to do this video? Wouldn't you like to know. I'm kidding. I came here by car. So, yes, I was in my car and drove here, but I would tell somebody: "I got here by car, not by bus", and that would tell them the difference in the transportation I took. "How did you get here?" You like that? Good, so that's "by", this is how you did it; and the way you travelled is here, "in" and "on". Remember there is a small exception for small vehicles, so a small boat you can be in. Remember small. And a bicycle, you're always on the bicycle, because people see you sitting on it. We good? Excellent. Now, that is the lesson for transportation.
PUNCTUATION MASTERCLASS - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes - Comma, Semicolon, Period, Etc.
 
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Learn PUNCTUATION Easily in 30 Minutes in this Punctuation Masterclass. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU9lY1HF5Mc&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix In this lesson, you will learn the rules for using: - period/full stop (.) - exclamation mark (!) - question mark (?) - comma (,) - semicolon (;) - colon (:) - apostrophe (') Partial transcript: Hello, and welcome back. In this lesson, I’m going to teach you the rules for using the seven most important punctuation marks, so that you can write correct English without making mistakes. There are exercises within the lesson to help you practice, and as always there is a final quiz at the end of the video. So, if you’re ready, let’s begin. We’re going to start with terminal punctuation. ‘Terminal’ means the end, so terminal punctuation marks are what we use to end a sentence. There are three of these: the period or the full stop, the exclamation mark, and the question mark. Let’s look at the period first. This mark is called the period in American English (AmE means American English), and it’s called the full stop in British English. It is used to mark the end of declarative and imperative sentences. I’ll explain. Here are some examples: “I teach English.” “We had pizza for dinner last night.” “If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella.” These sentences are called declarative sentences because they declare something; they give us some information. And at the end of each sentence, you see a period or full stop. Imperative sentences are commands or requests: “Please don’t feed the animals.” You might see this on a sign in a zoo. “Let me know what time your flight arrives.” “If it rains tomorrow, bring your umbrella.” Let’s now turn to the exclamation mark. It is used to convey strong emotion or feeling. Have a look at these two sentences: Both of them mean the same thing. The first sentence, which ends in a period, has no special feeling or emotion; it’s like saying “I’m really excited about my new job.” Doesn’t sound like I’m very excited, does it? That’s why we use the exclamation mark: “I’m really excited about my new job!” – it tells our reader to read the sentence with emotion – in this sentence, the emotion is excitement. This next sentence: “If you come to work late tomorrow, you’re fired!” Imagine a manger saying this to an employee. So, this expresses anger. In the same way, you can show many other feelings including surprise, joy, fear etc. using the exclamation mark. Now, both of these sentences are declarative, but you can also use the exclamation mark in an imperative sentence like this one: “Johnny, don’t play with your food!” You can imagine a mother saying that angrily to her son. So, it’s a strong or strict command. Another place where we use the exclamation mark is after interjections. Here are a couple of sentences: “Ouch! You just stepped on my foot!” “Wow! What a beautiful house!” Interjections are words like “ouch” and “wow” which are used to express feelings. So, remember: if you want to convey strong emotion in a sentence, put an exclamation mark at the end of it. If there’s no special feeling, just end the sentence with a period. OK, let’s turn now to the third terminal punctuation symbol: the question mark. It is used to mark the end of a question. So, it’s very straightforward: if a sentence is a question, then put a question mark at the end of it. Here are some examples: “What do you do?” “Are we allowed to feed the animals?” “If it rains tomorrow, should I bring my umbrella?” “Are you excited about your new job?” “Who lives in that house?” So, the rule is: if a sentence is a question, it must end with a question mark. Alright, let’s do a small exercise now. There are four sentences on the screen. I want you to add periods or full stops, exclamation marks and question marks where necessary. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video and check. OK, here are the answers. If you want, stop the video again, check your answers, then play the video and continue. Before we move on to the next topic, a quick note on spacing. Notice that there is no space between the last letter of a sentence and the terminal punctuation mark. If you put a space there, it’s wrong. But, when you begin a new sentence, you should leave a space after the terminal mark, and you should start the new sentence with a capital letter.
Views: 732271 Learn English Lab
Correct Use of WILL and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs WILL and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 See CONDITIONALS lessons here: https://goo.gl/YvhnwK For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: ‘Will’ and ‘would’. These two verbs cause a lot of confusion for English learners. So, in this video, I’m going to clear up that confusion for you. I will teach you the difference between these two modal verbs, and I’ll show you how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end to test your understanding. Alright, there are three main differences between ‘will’ and ‘would’. Let’s start with the most basic use of the two verbs. We use the verb ‘will’ to talk about the future. One very common use is to make a prediction, or say what we expect to happen in the future. Take this sentence: We will be in Hong Kong by 8 pm tomorrow. That means, we are traveling to Hong Kong and I expect that if our flight is on time, we will be there by 8 o’ clock tomorrow night. This next sentence also talks about the future but it’s a little different. I’m not hungry, so I will just have an orange juice. Imagine that you’re sitting in a restaurant with a friend and you say this. Here, you’re not talking about the distant future, you’re talking about the immediate future. In other words, here ‘will’ is used to express a decision that you have made. We also use ‘will’ to make a promise to someone: I’ll send you all the details by email. So, I’m promising to do something for you. OK, so that’s ‘will’. What about ‘would’? Well, ‘would’ is simply the past tense form of ‘will’. So imagine that we didn’t reach Hong Kong by 8 pm. Our flight was late. We only reached there at 2 in the morning. So then, we might look back at the past and say: We thought we would be in Hong Kong by 8 pm. But that didn’t happen. We often use ‘would’ when we report a past conversation – that is, we say what someone said in the past. For example: I wasn’t hungry, so I said that I would just have an orange juice. It’s the same sentence that we saw with ‘will’, but changed to the past tense. And the last sentence becomes: She said she would send me all the details by email. OK, now you know the basic use of ‘will’ and ‘would’. So let’s look at a more challenging use of these two verbs. This is the area of most confusion for people, and it is conditionals. That means sentences where you have a condition and a result. For example: If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella. That’s pretty easy. You see that I’m talking about something I will do in the future (“I’ll bring my umbrella”), but only on one condition – “if it rains.” Here’s another one: If Jared stops playing video games, his grades will improve. What do you understand by that? Well, it means that Jared probably spends a lot of time playing video games, so his grades are not very good. But if he stops playing video games, then he can spend more time studying, and we expect that his grades will improve. In both of these sentences, we’ve used ‘will’. And that is because both of these are real situations (these are both possible). This type of sentence is called the first conditional. But sometimes, we want to talk about imaginary or unreal situations. For example: If I had wings, I would fly all over the world. Obviously, this is not possible. I can’t grow wings, so all I’m doing is I’m using my imagination. Notice that we have used the past tense throughout this sentence – ‘If I had wings,’ – ‘I would fly’. We’re not talking about the past, but this past tense, including ‘would’, just shows that this is not real – it’s imaginary. Now, let’s go back to Jared and his video game addiction. What if I said: If Jared stopped playing video games, his grades would improve. It’s similar to the sentence with ‘will’, but using the past tense (with ‘would’) just shows that I don’t think this is possible. Jared is not going to stop, he’s just going to keep playing video games, and his grades are never going to improve. Remember, with ‘will’ it’s possible, with ‘would’ it’s not possible, it’s imaginary. And this type of sentence is called the second conditional. But there’s one more – the third conditional. This is used to talk about past conditions. Imagine that Jared had his exam, and as we expected, his grades were poor. So then we can say: If Jared had stopped playing video games, his grades would have improved. So here, we’re talking about a condition in the past. Notice that we say ‘had stopped’ (this is the past perfect tense) in the condition, and we use ‘would have’ in the result.
Views: 986683 Learn English Lab
Weak Forms - How to Pronounce Weak Forms in English
 
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Weak forms are an important part of English pronunciation. The same word can have very different pronunciations depending on what it does in the sentence. Understanding weak and strong forms in English will really help your English speaking and listening. See the full version of this lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/weak-forms-english. Contents: 1. Which Words Have Weak Forms? 1:53 2. When Should You Use Weak Forms? 5:47 3. When Should You Use Strong Forms? 8:02 4. Practice with Weak Forms 11:11 This lesson will help you: - Be able to recognize which English words have weak forms. - Understand when to use weak forms in English. - Know when to use strong forms in English. - Practice English pronunciation of weak forms. - Understand how to recognize different sounds in weak and strong forms. You can find more great, free lessons like this on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 118306 Oxford Online English
How to know a word's gender | Super Easy German (70)
 
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GET EXERCISES FOR THIS VIDEO: http://www.patreon.com/easygerman --- ALL ENDINGS + GENDERS: FEMININ: -ei -anz -enz -heit -keit -ie -ik -ion -ität -schaft -ung -ur -in (weibliche Berufsbezeichnungen) MASKULIN: -ant -ent -ich -ling -die meisten Nomen auf -er -ismus -ist -or -Alle Tage, Monate, -die meisten Wetterelemente: -alle Himmelsrichtungen: -Fast alle alkoholischen Getränke: Neutrum: -chen -lein -ment -um -ma - Substantivierte Verben: das Leben, das Schwimmen, das Laufen - die meisten Metalle:das Gold, das Silber, das Aluminium - die meisten Worte, die mit ge- anfangen: das Gebäude... --- SUBSCRIBE: http://goo.gl/sdP9nz LEARN GERMAN IN BERLIN: http://easygerman.org/#summerschool FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/easygermanvideos INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/easygermanvideos EASY GERMAN ON MEMRISE: http://www.memrise.com/course/1343772/easy-german/ WEBSITE: http://www.easygerman.org/ EASY GERMAN SHOP: http://www.shop.spreadshirt.com/easygerman --- ► PRODUCED IN COOPERATION WITH: http://www.theglobalexperience.org Easy Languages is an international video project aiming at supporting people worldwide to learn languages through authentic street interviews and expose the street culture of participating partner countries abroad. Episodes are produced in local languages and contain subtitles in both the original language as well as in English. --- Host of this episode: Carina Schmid (http://www.carisafari.de) Camera: Janusz Hamerski Edit: Janusz Hamerski / Carina Schmid Translation: Ben Eve
Views: 274743 Easy German
Paraphrasing:  The Basic Steps
 
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It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
Views: 544515 DiveIn Learning
011 - a/an vs. the (Rule 2) English Articles - Beginning English Lesson - Basic English Grammar
 
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http://www.englishanyone.com/power-learning/ Learn to express yourself confidently in fluent English and sound like a native speaker with our FREE Power Learning video course! كيف تتعلم إنجليزي بسهولة Ты поняла разницу между 'a' и 'the'? With our latest video series, EnglishAnyone.com is attempting to pull off the seemingly impossible: we're going to teach English, to absolute beginners with no English speaking experience, IN English! This unique, revolutionary series throws out the usual English teaching conventions, parts with the traditional order in which grammar is taught and makes English accessible to anyone who wants to learn! For teachers curious to see how this is possible, and for students of any ability level who want to improve their English, welcome to English Anyone! Lesson 11 - Indefinite & Definite Articles 2 A & an are indefinite articles. The is the definite article. a/an vs the: Use a/an when you are selecting one of a group and the when there is only one of something. For more great tips and videos, and to get fluent in English faster with our FREE Email Video Course, visit us at http://www.englishanyone.com/
Views: 63575 EnglishAnyone
Basic English Grammar - Have, Has, Had
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ By special request -- this lesson teaches you about the easily and often mixed-up English verb "have"!
English  Lesson Definite Article "the"
 
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This lesson discusses how and when to use "the". There are always exceptions, but this lesson gives the main points quickly. Revised 9/4/2014 www.eslhelpers.org
Views: 1732 Kath Katsenis
Rules to use definite article | The correctly in English grammar rules | article rules hindi
 
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Rules to use definite article the Nmskar Dosto apka shwagt hai apke Apne privar me Apko HM article ke bare Pura details de rhe Lgatar hmare sath bne rhiye aplog apko article Pura achche SE pdaya Jayege jisse ap any competition exam ki qualified kr Skte hai CTET SYLLABUS 2019 https://youtu.be/2re2OBsSy68 Articles part 1 use a,an https://youtu.be/amUHy8niYXI CTET model paper 2019 https://youtu.be/aqU-ZyI6l9E Articles part 3 use The https://youtu.be/78Ww6nr8Uz0 Direction and Distance https://youtu.be/slkOgyv2Drw
Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes - Present, Past, Future | Simple, Continuous, Perfect
 
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Learn all of the 12 tenses in English easily in this lesson. This lesson features simple explanations, lots of example sentences and illustrations. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 5. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 3638375 Learn English Lab
HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN - How to Use These Forms Correctly (with Examples) - English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use have been / has been / had been correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. Most Common MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://goo.gl/n8BJ7v 2. HAVE HAD / HAS HAS / HAD HAD: https://goo.gl/Aj3hRD 3. SHOULD HAVE / COULD HAVE / WOULD HAVE: https://goo.gl/X2bw7J 4. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://goo.gl/oC2qKX 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://goo.gl/A3VuGh 6. All MODAL VERBS lessons: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 Transcript: ‘Have been’, ‘has been’ and ‘had been’. These forms cause a lot of confusion for many people. Well, in this video, I will clear up that confusion. I’m going to teach you the three main uses of these forms how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. Alright, let’s get started. Before we talk about the uses, you need to know the basics of where to use have, has and had been: in the present, if the subject of a sentence is I/You/We/They or a plural noun, then we use ‘have been’. If the subject is He/She/It or a singular noun, then we use ‘has been’. This is when we talk about the present. When we talk only about the past, it’s very easy. For any subject, we use ‘had been’. OK, let me test you: what do we use with He/She/It or a singular noun in the present? We use ‘has been’. What about with I/You/We/They or plural nouns? We use ‘have been’. And in the past tense? We use ‘had been’ for all subjects. Good, so let’s now look at the first use of these forms. This is in the present perfect tense. That is, to talk about actions or situations that started in the past and are still continuing. Here’s an example: “I have been working as a teacher for 7 years.” In speech, we usually shorten ‘I have’ to ‘I’ve’ – “I’ve been working as a teacher for 7 years.” Let’s look at a timeline for this. You know that I started working as a teacher seven years ago (or in 2010 because at the time of filming this video, right now, it’s 2017), and I’m still a teacher, so this action – ‘working’ is continuing. In this sentence, we can also say: “I have been working as a teacher since 2010.” The difference between ‘for’ and ‘since’ is that if you want to mention the duration (or amount of time), then you use ‘for’ (like ‘for 7 years’). If you want to mention the starting point of the action or situation, use ‘since’ (as in ‘since 2010’). Here’s another example: let’s say that this lady wants to see the doctor. Her appointment was at 3 o’clock. She came to the hospital at 3, but the doctor wasn’t there. So she started waiting at 3 o’clock and she’s still waiting – let’s say it’s 5 o’clock now, so two hours have passed. So what can we say? We can say: “She has been waiting for two hours.” or “She has been waiting since 3 o’clock.” In natural speech, we say he‘s been and she’s been: “She’s been waiting”. OK have a look at this sentence: “He has been the CEO of the company for four months” or we can say ‘since June’ because that’s when he started. Here, we don’t have an –ing verb like ‘working’ or ‘waiting’. That’s because we don’t want to focus on any action, we just want to express the situation – that he became the CEO in June and he’s still the CEO. Here’s another example: “They’ve been married for 25 years / since 1992.” When did they get married? In 1992. Are they still married now? Yes. So, they’ve been married for 25 years now. OK, so what about ‘had been’? Well, let’s change our sentences a little bit: “I had been working as a teacher for 7 years when I quit my job.” Ah, we see a different meaning here. It means that I started working as a teacher at some point in the past, I was a teacher for 7 years, but then I quit. So now, I am no longer a teacher. I want you to notice that there are two past actions here: one continuous action (“I had been working as a teacher”) and a single finished action at the end of that (“I quit”). Compare this to the previous sentence – “I have been working as a teacher” – here, there is only one continuous action and it’s still continuing, it’s not finished. So, please remember this rule: only use ‘had been’ if there were two events in the past: a continuing action or a situation and a single, finished action. So let’s go back to the other sentences. With these, we can say: “She had been waiting for two hours when the doctor finally arrived.” “He’d been the CEO of the company for only four months when it went bankrupt.” ‘Went bankrupt’ means the company lost all its money and closed down. “They had been married for 25 years when they divorced.” So are they still married? Unfortunately, no. Just like the sentences with ‘have been’ and ‘has been’ are in the present perfect tense, the sentences with ‘had been’ are in the past perfect tense.
Views: 2219685 Learn English Lab
50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English Grammar - Error Identification & Correction
 
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Find out if you make the 50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English, and learn how to avoid them. See all GRAMMAR LESSONS here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. ***** ALSO CHECK OUT ***** 1. PARTS OF SPEECH LESSONS: https://goo.gl/ouZgqu 2. TENSES LESSONS: https://goo.gl/7t5Hkg 3. MODAL VERBS LESSONS: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 4. CONDITIONALS LESSONS: https://goo.gl/prd7ex 5. ARTICLES LESSONS: https://goo.gl/3xdcJP
Views: 868265 Learn English Lab
How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson
 
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✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI 👉 Check the latest Video - American Idioms I love to use the most? How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson I will share easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. • Avoid using contractions – Do not use contractions while constructing your sentences, esp. if you are writing a business email or formal letters i.e. words like don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, isn’t, haven’t should be avoided. • Avoid there are/ there is – It will make your sentence more lengthy and boring to read. e.g There are many problems in her class (incorrect) Her class is facing many problems. (Correct) There is an exhibition at the hotel. (Incorrect) The hotel is holding an exhibition. (Correct) • Avoid using unnecessary words in your sentences like very; really, a lot instead use better vocabulary. It will definitely not change the meaning of your sentence but will make it sound interesting. Students think literature is very hard. Students think literature is difficult. • Make use of strong verbs – It will make your sentence sound more appropriate and concrete. He gave assistance to my friend. (weak verb) My friend assisted him. (Strong verb)
25 RULES of articles
 
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about articles in English
The Present Perfect Tense | English Grammar Lesson
 
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This lesson is an overview of the present perfect tense What it looks like, how to use it and when to use it! Structure: Subject + have/has + main verb (past participle form) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ If you don’t feel confident using the present perfect tense in English yet… There are probably a few reasons why! You need to know the past participle form of English verbs... And that can be pretty tricky with irregular verbs! 😳 And you need to understand how to use this tense! Perhaps you feel unsure about when to use the present perfect and when to use the past simple tenses. I will explain all of this inside this lesson. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ When using the present perfect tense, you need an auxiliary verb that helps your main verb to function. In the perfect tenses, the verb (to) have is always the auxiliary verb. In the present perfect tense, the main verb is in the past participle form. This is not difficult for regular past tense verbs. For regular verbs, the past participle form of the verb is the same as the past tense verb, so you just add -ed! But irregular verbs are different and the only way to learn the past participle form is to learn them individually. Past simple or present perfect tense? To answer this question you need to think about time. Finished time and unfinished time. Think about ‘last week’. That’s a good example of finished time. Last week is finished, it’s over. Yesterday, last week, last month, last year, 1991 - these are all examples of finished time… Time that is complete. What about ‘this week’? Is this week finished? No! Not yet. That is an example of unfinished time. There’s still more of this week to come. It’s not finished yet. When you are talking about a time period that has finished, use the past simple. When you are talking about a time period that is unfinished… Like today, this week, this month, this year, use the present perfect. Watch this lesson to learn when to use the present perfect and when to use the past simple tense. Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/09/13/the-present-perfect-tense/ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Are you a WOMAN 💃🏻 learning English? http://bit.ly/TheLadiesProject Check out The Ladies' Project to find speaking partners and build your confidence as an English speaker! *I recommend* ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRiVfHqBIIvSgKmgnSY66g?sub_confirmation=1 Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 1148820 mmmEnglish
SEO For Beginners: 3 Powerful SEO Tips to Rank #1 on Google in 2019
 
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SEO For Beginners: 3 Powerful SEO Tips to Rank #1 on Google in 2019 Are you new to SEO and want to rank #1 on google this upcoming year? Here are 3 SEO strategies that will boost your rankings! #1: Focus on content Google has this update called Hummingbird, and with Hummingbird, websites who just have content on everything won't do as well as sites which focus on one single niche and are super thorough. You want to be VERY thorough with your SEO content. Poke holes in your content and fill them all up, so then that way people are like, "This is the end all site "that you should end up reading "if you're interested in dating online." #2: Optimize your title tag and your meta description Have you ever done a Google search, and noticed that every time you do it, there is this link at the top, and then there's this one sentence with a link at the top is called the title tag. And the description below is called the meta description. Now think of it this way, if you search for the phrase online dating, and you don't see the word online dating in neither the title or the description, are you going to click on the result? Well if you are, there's something wrong, because why would you click on a result that isn't related to what you're looking for? In addition to that, have you ever searched for a term like online dating? And have you ever noticed that the word isn't in the title or description? That's because Google tracks who's clicking on what listing, and they've learned that when a keyword is in the listing, that same keyword that you're searching for, they know you're way more likely to click through. So in your title tag and your meta description, make sure you include the keyword. But you can't just add the keyword, "online dating," right? The easiest way and what I would do and I wish it was this simple; I will just put "online dating, online dating, online dating, online dating." If I could put it 20 times so people would know that the article is on online dating, I wish I would get more clicks. But it's not that simple. Yes you have to include the keyword in your title and your description, but it has to be appealing. If it doesn't flow in a sentence, it's not easy to read, and it's not appealing or evoking curiosity, no one is gonna click through. #3: Use Google Search Console Did you know that Google gives you a tool that teaches you how to rank number one on Google? Yes I know that sounds ridiculous but it is true, and it's called Google Search Console. If you're not already a user of it, sign up. It doesn't cost a dollar. You're missing out if you're not using it. I can't emphasize that enough. So now that you're using Google Search Console...give it a few days because it takes some time to populate data. You'll see a screen that shows Search Analytics and this shows you all the pages on your website that are getting you traffic. But the cool thing about Google Search Console is they also show you which articles are getting impressions. Take all the keywords you're getting impressions for and start adding them to your copy. Now we have an article on Instagram, and it teaches you how to get over 300 targeted Instagram followers per day. The article is around 10,000 words. When I first wrote that article, it wasn't 10,000 words, it was roughly 2,500. I went to Google Search Console, I saw all the people that are searching for terms related to the article, I added them within that article. I made it more thorough and you know what? My SEO traffic more than tripled to that article. Yes it is that simple. And when I made that change, it didn't happen right away, but I noticed the results within 50 days. That's not a long time. Now that you've learned these three tips, I challenge you in which I want you to take these tactics and implement them, and then after you implement them, in the next 45 days I want you to leave a comment with your results. Because if you're not doing well, that means I'm not happy. Subscribe here to learn more of my secret SEO tips: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=neilvkpatel Find me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neilkpatel/ Read more on my blog: https://neilpatel.com/blog #NeilPatel #seo #seotips
Views: 1147387 Neil Patel
Film Theory: All Your Memes Are DEAD! (Article 13)
 
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Get Your NEW Holiday Theory Wear! ► http://bit.ly/2B7pUMe Are Shane Dawson's Videos Dangerous? ► https://bit.ly/2qUjgCV You'll DIE Before This Bee Movie Meme! ► https://bit.ly/2Cp18Jk SUBSCRIBE for More Film Theories! ► http://bit.ly/1dI8VBH They are coming for your internet. Who? The EU. They've come up with a copyright law that will change the way people use the internet FOREVER. Theorists, it's up to us to understand what Article 13 is and how it is dangerous. For the love of memes and YouTube videos, let's make our voices heard. Don't forget to snuggle up in our new hood-tastic holiday Theory Wear! ► http://bit.ly/2B7pUMe Need Royalty Free Music for your Content? Try Epidemic Sound. Get Your 30 Day Free Trial Now ► http://share.epidemicsound.com/FilmTheorists #Article13 #SaveYourInternet #EU #Memes #EUBan #MemeBan #EUArticle13 #FilmTheory MORE FILM THEORIES The HORRIFIC Story of Salad Fingers ►► https://bit.ly/2zRiMTi ENDING The Salad Fingers Mystery ► https://bit.ly/2PbkV1w HOW MANY Calories is Stay Puft Marshmallow Man? ► https://bit.ly/2rZaIM9 Don't Hug Me I'm Scared DECODED! ► https://bit.ly/2yahO2o The HIDDEN LORE of DHMIS! ► https://bit.ly/2E0jYbc
Views: 4071269 The Film Theorists
English Sentence Structure - English Grammar Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about sentence structure in English. You’ll learn how to construct all kinds of sentences in English, from the simplest possible sentences, to long, complex sentences which contain many different ideas. Practice using correct sentence structure and post your example sentences in the comments! See the full version of this lesson on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/sentence-structure. In this lesson, you'll learn: - How to build simple sentences. - Using compliments. - Adding onto simple sentences to create more detailed sentence structure. - How to add description to your sentence. - How to make complex sentences with independent clauses. - How to make complex sentences with dependent clauses. Contents: 1. How to Build a Simple Sentence 0:32 2. Complements - What Comes Next? 2:58 3. Adding Description to Your Sentences 8:43 4. How to Make Complex Sentences with Independent Clauses 11:41 5. How to Make Complex Sentences with Dependent Clauses 15:36 To see more free English lessons like this one, visit our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 1013303 Oxford Online English
How to write an Article (Cambridge First, Advanced; Blogs)
 
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Article writing is a very different style of writing and requires a different approach from the essay. In this lesson, we look at how to write for the Cambridge tests, as well as how to write for the web, including blogs and newsletters. Find out how to use a more playful language to capture a reader’s attention. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 194133 Write to Top
Basic English Grammar - Noun, Verb, Adjective, Adverb
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ What is a noun? What is a verb? What is an adjective? AHHHHH!!! Learn how to recognize nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in this important basic grammar lesson. Then test yourself with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/basics-noun-verb-adjective-adverb/
ARTICLES ( ENGLISH GRAMMAR RULE-1) हिंदी
 
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1st lesson of ADVANCE ENGLISH ACADEMY is an Article, I am going teach you, what is an article? the basic rule of English grammar is an article. let's watch... https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQzizae_H7SJFaDOW4QkYsw
Articles: rule review and practice
 
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Articles: rule review and practice
Views: 61 Michaela Bertrand
Fewer vs Less with nouns — English Grammar Rules
 
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☆★Grammar man's Complete Learning Packages: https://grammarman-academy.com *New courses being added all the time! In today's English lesson, Grammar man explains another common error made by ESL students, as well as native English speakers. Fewer and Less are not interchangeable! They are governed by certain grammar rules, even though they mean the same thing! Adding "fewer" to your linguistic repertoire will add some style to your speech, and the rule is much simpler than you probably think :) The basic rule is: "Fewer" with countable nouns and "Less" with uncountable nouns but alas, as always, there are some exceptions to this rule. Watch this short lesson to find out what these are, so you can use these words confidently, and competently! ---------- Be sure to check out Grammar man's other lessons on English vocabulary, as well as English lessons on grammar, pronunciation, common errors and everything in between, which are posted on the 'English lessons with Grammar man' channel every few days :) Grammar man is a professional English teacher from Australia. He now resides in Switzerland where he is director of the prestigious language learning academy - Progressive English located in Zurich. ------- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishGrammarMan1 ☆★Grammar man's Complete Learning Packages: https://grammarman-academy.com Grammar man's English school in Zurich: https://www.progressive-english.ch
10 Strict Rules BLACKPINK Has To Follow On Tour
 
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Rules you didn't know k-pop girl group BLACKPINK follows. Subscribe to our channel: https://goo.gl/hHvOf8 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Blackpink is taking no prisoners as they skyrocket to the top of the charts and eliminate the competition. K-Pop’s mainstream emergence is traced back to the early ’90s. With the familiarity of the term being made in the 2000s internationally. Blackpink has come on the scene at just the right time. With a firm target market and committed fan base, the all-girl group has turned more heads than the genre has ever seen. Blackpink has made a lasting impression, and that trend is sure to continue. Although, YG Entertainment recently partnered with major US labels in 2018 to expand Blackpink’s international prominence - Blackpink is represented by Interscope and Universal Music Group, outside of Asia. Blackpink is not only rubbing shoulders with global influencers, but they’re breaking records while doing it. Blackpink is listed as one of the “10 Most Anticipated K-Pop Albums of 2019” on Billboard. They will be the first K-Pop band to play at Coachella in April of 2019. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheTalko Twitter: https://twitter.com/thetalko Instagram: https://instagram.com/the_talko ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.thetalko.com/
Views: 2028363 TheTalko
German articles 02 - learn German articles - German for beginners - easy German grammar
 
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Deutsch lernen - German learning A1 - German for beginners - easy German grammar this video assists you in using the right article, especially for nouns where there is no rule governing the gender ; it's an exercising video to use the right article it's a part of my German online course - Deutsch lernen A1 I developed a method called "Artikelmatrix", in order that you will remember the right article in your daily German conversation using the right articles is necessary to get the A1 and A2 level with my videos you can learn German in an intuitive way with speaking activities for German
Views: 32 Michele
English Grammar: Articles ("A" & "The")
 
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This is free English lesson is about articles ("a" & "the"). After this lesson, you will know when to use "the" and "a."
Views: 237 MyEnglishCloud
Basic English Grammar: Parts of Speech – noun, verb, adjective, pronoun, adverb...
 
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In this video, I will go over the different parts of speech in English. We will be looking at the use of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs. You will also learn how to arrange them in a grammatically correct sentence. Also, I will teach you in what order to place the adjectives if you have more than one. For example, do you have a "big, white, excitable dog" or a "white, excitable, big dog"? Find out by watching this lesson and doing the quiz afterwards at https://www.engvid.com/basic-english-grammar-parts-of-speech/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. James from engVid. I would like to talk about something that will help you understand English, and it's two things. Number one are parts of speech. What are the parts of speech and how do you use them? The second is called syntax, which is a very complicated word for word order. Where do you put the words in a sentence? In some languages they have a different word order, some languages it doesn't really matter, but what my job today is, is to show you where the words go and: What do they basically mean-okay-in the parts of speech? As E said: "Words. Where do they go?" Now, if you're new to English or even if you're an intermediate student, sometimes this causes you problems. Right? You've heard the terms: "preposition", "determiner", "syntax", and you're like: "Oh, it's so complicated." Today's lesson will be simple. You can go over this again and again. It will help you understand and use English better. So I'm going to start off with the most basic part of parts of speech, and I want to start with the things part. Things. Not actions, but things. I am a person. My watch is a thing. Okay? An animal, a cat or a dog, or an apple, these are things. We call these things nouns, because nouns name people - Hi, I'm James; places - Toronto, Ontario; things - my watch; animals - a cat, meow; and food - an apple. Okay? These are nouns. Example: boy, dog, apple. Okay? Nouns name these things. But sometimes you don't want to keep using the same noun again and again. "James ate the apple and James walked his dog as James talked to his friend, Oliver, and then James..." It gets what we call repetitive and boring, and it also makes the sentences go really slow. And sometimes we want to use the noun in a different way. So in this case we introduce what's called pronouns. Pronouns can replace nouns in a sentence. So now you could say something like this: "James ate the apple and he walked his dog." Instead of: "James ate the apple and James walked his dog", we can use a pronoun to replace it and make it simpler. We still know we're talking about James. Now, we talked about word order or syntax. Let me explain this. In order to use a pronoun first you must use the noun. Okay? You introduce the noun and then you can replace it with a pronoun. That's why you see number one then number two. You cannot just start with a pronoun. If I started a sentence at the beginning: "He went to the store." The very first thing you will say to me is: "Who's he?" I go: "Oh, James went to the store and he bought the apples there." And you go: "Oh, now I know who he is." So, pronouns kind of number two because you have to actually introduce first with a noun, then you can replace it with a pronoun. Now, we have several types of pronouns. I'm just going to go over and show you a couple of them so you get an idea. Pronouns include: "I", "we", which are subject pronouns. Object pronouns when we're talking about something that's not us, but something on the other side that receives action, as a subject pronoun I do things. I run. Right? We eat dinner. We're talking to them. Now, when we say "them", you go: "What?" Well, they are receiving it and we call those object pronouns. Okay? So the most basic ones are subject and object pronouns. One is doing something, one is receiving. There are reflexive pronouns, like: "himself" where somebody is talking about themselves. "He built the house himself." So he's talking about him as an object, but reflecting it back to himself. We call it reflexive pronoun. Okay? There are others, but I'm not going to get into them right now because I want to keep this simple just so you know what the parts of speech are, and you can always come to engVid to come and see other lessons in which we go deeply into reflexive pronouns, object and subject pronouns. Okay? Cool. So we talked about how pronouns can replace nouns, and we're good with that. Yeah? So let's go to stage number three, because once you've replaced them, how do you know the difference between them? Apple, apple. I don't know. That's when we have adjectives. Adjectives. The word itself can be broken into two parts: "ject" and "ad". But remember... Do you remember when I said subject and object, and I gave you the example? I said, for instance: "I" is a subject pronoun. Right? Subject, yeah, I'm good at this.
Correct Usage of Grammar: Rule - 06
 
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This is the 6th Tutorial of 82 Series Tutorial of Essential Grammar Rules. To get regular updates on several Topics keep eyes on our public group, fan page, website... Our public group: https://facebook.com/groups/grecenter Our fan page: https://facebook.com/grebd Our Website: http://grecenter.org
Views: 1028 GREC Videos
Articles ( Usage of A/ An)   (Competitive Exams-32)- Hindi
 
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Usage of Indefinite articles:- A / An..
Spanish Grammar: Expressing Definite Articles Using Correct Spanish Grammar
 
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Spanish Grammar: Expressing Definite Articles Using Correct Spanish Grammar. Students learn that the Spanish language has four words that mean "the." There are two masculines, one singular and the other plural. There are two feminine forms; one for singular and another to express "the" before a plural feminine noun. The video offers color coding to facilitate understanding. There are several examples. The challenging thing is to remember which nouns are masculine and which ones are feminine. Although there are some patterns that offer clues, there is no hard, fast rule. The best way to know is to memorize them. There is also a practice section at the end of the video. You may want to pause the video after the narrator, myself, says "Now you try." I always say this just before giving the example. The correct answer will appear on screen right away. This is why many users, especially teachers, will want to pause the video. Students have ample time to respond this way. Individuals who are attempting to learn the material may want to be ready with the pause button so that they can self-assess. There are more links posted below this text that may further your understanding or that of your students. ¡Buena Suerte! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49jpaV-GM8M http://studentweb.cortland.edu/Christine.Murphy/miniproj2/gramatica.html http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/defart1.htm http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3ldEPDcZhM http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qzReIepQSc http://www.spanish-reference.com/articles.php http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~annw/articulos.html http://studentweb.cortland.edu/stacey.butler/edunit/definitearticles.html http://www.indiana.edu/~spangram/GENGRAM/articles-def.html http://www.colby.edu/~bknelson/SLC/articulos1.php http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/4 http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/intro_def_art.htm
Views: 493 Brad Settle
ARTICLES RULE FOR USE OF (THE) MOST UNIQUE FOR PREPARATION FOR NAVY AIRFORCE SSC ARMY.
 
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We are coming back with new video we hope you like my video. Facebook page: - https://m.facebook.com/pappu.chandansingh Instagram page: - https://instagram.com/iampcs7?utm_source=ig_profile_share&igshid=dm5xba08jb44 Thx 🙏 for watching my video friend..... Next video coming soon...
Important rule of articles OMISSION
 
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#educationthebirthright Is video main hum padenge ki articles kahan kahan nahi lagte hain Thanks for watching.... e mail- [email protected] Facebook page- Education the birth right Instagram- iashistorycurrent91
That's English! Episode 1: "the"
 
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“That’s English!” provides basic grammar rules for beginners learning English.This is Episode 1, about the article “the”. In this 2 minute video, we cover two rules for using “the” and one common mistake. Each rule has an example with pictures. You can pause and replay the video as many times as you want. Like with anything, practice, practice, practice! Be sure to look out for extras like definitions of new words!
Views: 306 ILSCCommunityTV
Correct Usage of Grammar: Rule - 11
 
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This is the 11th Tutoriral Topics keep eyes on our public group, fan page, website... Our public group: https://facebook.com/groups/grecenter Our fan page: https://facebook.com/grebd Our Website: http:al of 82 Series Tutorial of Essential Grammar Rules. To get regular updates on seve//grecenter.org
Views: 791 GREC Videos
How to get around Ezine Articles no Affiliate Link Rule
 
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http://www.paul-hooper.com This video will show you how you can get around Ezine Articles no affiliate link rule by buying a domain name and forwarding it on to any affiliate product. I will also have this video posted on my Blog, where I have many more valuable tips on Internet Marketing. Just visit my Blog at http://www.paul-hooper.com and please feel free to leave a comment too.
Views: 3804 Paul Hooper