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Articles (a, an, the) - Lesson 1 - 7 Rules For Using Articles Correctly - English Grammar
 
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In this lesson, learn the 7 rules for using articles in English correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I will teach you the seven rules that you need to know for using articles in English correctly. Articles are the words ‘a’, ‘an’, and ‘the’. There is a final quiz at the end of the lesson for you to test your understanding. OK, the first rule is about where to use ‘a’ and where to use ‘an’. So rule number one is use ‘a’ before a consonant sound, and ‘an’ before a vowel sound. So in all of these words – you see that they start with a consonant sound. Cat starts with /k/, dog starts with /d/, boy with /b/, girl with /g/, house with /h/ and tree with /t/. So we say ‘a cat’, ‘a dog’, ‘a boy’, ‘a girl’, ‘a house’, ‘a tree’ etc. Notice that in natural speech, we don’t say ‘a’, we say ‘uh’ – like ‘a cat’. In this next set of words, you see that, they all start with a vowel sound – apple starts with /ae/, engineer starts with /e/, ice-cream with /ai/, old with /o/, umbrella with /uh/. So we say ‘an apple’, ‘an engineer’, ‘an ice-cream cone’, ‘an old womman’, ‘an umbrella’ and so on. In speech, we don’t say ‘an’, we say /ən/. Let’s do a small exercise. You see ten items on the screen. For each one, I want you to say if you would use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before it. Stop the video, think about it, then play the video again and check. OK here are the answers. Did you get them all right? I want to focus on items number seven to ten because these are a little tricky. Number seven is ‘a university’ because even though ‘university’ starts with the letter ‘u’ the first sound of the word is not a vowel sound. We don’t say /ooniversity/. We say /yoo-nə- vər-si-ty/ so that first sound is a /y/ sound, which a consonant sound, so we say ‘a university.’ Number eight is similar. The word ‘European’ starts with a /y/ sound, so ‘a European tour.’ In number nine, the spelling has an ‘h’ at the start but that ‘h’ is silent. We don’t say /hau-ər/, we say /au-ər/. The first sound is an /au/ sound which is a vowel sound, so this is ‘an hour’. In the same way, in number ten, we say MA. ‘M’ starts with an /e/ sound which is again a vowel sound, so ‘an MA in English’. OK let’s move on to rule number two: Use ‘a’ and ‘an’ ONLY with singular, countable nouns. We say that a noun is countable if we can count it – one, two, three, four etc. All of these words on the screen are countable. We can say one elephant, three cars, ten teachers, five hundred onions and so on. Now if you talk about one person or thing, like one elephant or one car, then that’s called a singular noun and if you say ten teachers or five hundred onions, those are called plural nouns. Uncountable nouns cannot be counted in this way. Nouns like water, sugar, milk, love, anger, knowledge are some examples. If you think about it, you cannot say “I drank four waters” or “I want eight milks”. To a person, you can say “I love you” but you can’t say “I have five loves for you” – that doesn’t make any sense. So these are all uncountable. Alright, so the rule is - you can only use ‘a’ and ‘an’ if you’re talking about one person or one thing. Let’s do another quick exercise. Here are ten items again. This time, you see ‘a’ or ‘an’ before the nouns, but some of these are wrong. They should NOT have ‘a’ or ‘an’ before them. Stop the video, identify the mistakes, then play the video again and check. OK, here are the answers. Number three is wrong because ‘shirts’ is a plural and you cannot use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before a plural noun. Number five is wrong because ‘happiness’ is uncountable, so again, ‘a’ or ‘an’ cannot be used there. The same goes for number six – water is uncountable. Number nine is wrong because ‘doctors’ is a plural – you can say ‘a doctor’ but not ‘a doctors’. And finally, in number ten, advice is an uncountable noun – so you cannot ask for ‘an advice’. Now a quick note here: the article ‘the’ can be used with all kinds of nouns – singular or plural countable nouns, and uncountable nouns. OK, so let’s now talk about how to choose between ‘a’ or ‘an’ and ‘the’. Here’s rule number three: Use ‘a’ or ‘an’ to talk about a person or thing unknown to your listener. And use ‘the’ to talk about a person or thing known to your listener. For example, “My sister has two computers: a PC and a laptop. The PC is quite old but the laptop is brand new.” I say ‘a PC’ and ‘a laptop’ because that’s the first time I’m mentioning the two computers. That is, until this point, they are unknown to you, the listener.
Views: 687703 Learn English Lab
A, AN, THE - Articles in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ 'I saw A movie last night' or 'I saw THE movie last night'? A, AN, and THE are called articles and they can be very confusing. Learn exactly when and how to use articles in English in this important grammar lesson! http://www.engvid.com/a-an-the-articles-in-english/
How to Use The - Articles in English Grammar
 
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Do you know how to use THE in English? It can be very confusing. If your language doesn’t have a word like the, learning how to use the correctly can be very difficult. Leave us a comment and practice what you learned in the lesson! In this class, we'll look at some simple advice and basic rules which will make it easier to remember how to use the correctly in English. See the full version of this lesson with a quiz on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/use-the. Contents: 1. What Does 'The' Mean? 1:47L 2. 'The' = WE Know Which One You Mean 2:48 3. How Do You Know If a Noun Needs 'The'? 6:45 4. When Not to Use 'The' 11:06 This lesson can help you: - Understand what exactly The means. - Learn how to use The to talk about specific things. - Recognize when a noun needs The. - See when not to use The See more free English lessons like this one on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 20026 Oxford Online English
Articles -  a, an & the  -  English Grammar lesson
 
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Articles - a, an & the - English Grammar lesson Take the quiz - http://www.learnex.in/articles-a-an-the/ The 3 articles in English are a, an and the. The learner has to decide noun-by-noun which one of the articles to use. In fact, there are 4 choices to make, because sometimes no article is necessary. Native-speakers, of course, use the articles correctly without thinking. English learners, on the other hand, need to have some guidelines for making the right choice - particularly those learners whose own language does not have articles. The guidelines that follow in this lesson should help ESL students to a basic understanding of English article use. The words a, an and the are known as articles. • We use an before words that begin with vowels (a,e,i,o,u). E.g. I found an orange boat. However there are few exceptions like the words honest and hour. In the words honest and hour the alphabet h is silent and therefore the letter o becomes the first alphabet of the word and hence we use the article an. E.g. Mr. Smith is an honest man. I will be with you in an hour. We use a before words that begin with consonants (all the letters of the alphabet except the vowels). E.g. Bumble is a baby elephant. • We use the before words that we have already spoken about. E.g. I bought an apple. The apple is very sweet.
Grammar: Using THE with common and abstract nouns
 
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An abstract noun is a word that means a general concept or idea, like "life" or "friendship". We can use "the" with common nouns, as in "the sky is blue". But can we use "the" with abstract nouns? For example, would you say "happiness is important" or "the happiness is important"? If you are not sure, watch this lesson to learn when to use "the" with general and abstract nouns. Don't forget to take the quiz afterwards to test your understanding! http://www.engvid.com/grammar-the-common-abstract-nouns/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. Many English learners have trouble deciding when to use "the" or no "the", so I understand that problem, I know it can be a little bit confusing, but I believe that by the end of this lesson, you're going to find it much easier. Okay? So let's start with a little quiz first to see where you stand regarding that word "the". So, let's look at this first example. Should you say: "Life is beautiful." or "The life is beautiful."? Okay. Think about it. Decide. Another one: "Friendship is precious." or "The friendship is precious."? Which one is right? Think for yourself. We'll do one more, and then I'll give you the answers. "Happiness is important." or "The happiness is important."? Which one is correct? Do you know? How do you know? How do you decide which one is right? I'll tell you. When we're talking about something which is a general concept or idea, then we do not use "the". Okay? For example, let's take the first one. "Life is beautiful." Now, life is a general concept, so we do not need "the". So, this is the correct answer. All right? Not this. "Life is beautiful." Because life is a general idea, a general concept. Okay? We're not talking about anything specific. If we say: "The life of wise people is beautiful." that is something specific, and then we would be correct to say: "The life". Okay? But if we're just talking in general, then no "the". Let's look at the next example. "Friendship is precious." Again, friendship is a general idea or a general concept, so this is correct. Okay? In this example, this one was wrong. But if I said, for example: "The friendship between those two children is precious." then that would be fine, because now I'm specifying which friendship. Right? The friendship between those two children, so then it becomes specific, and then we would use "the". But in this example, this is correct. Okay? Just like this was, and this is wrong, because this is a general idea. Okay? Next one: "Happiness is important." By now you know, again, happiness is a general idea, a general concept, so this is correct. In this example, it would be wrong to say: "The happiness", because: The happiness of what? So, if we say: "The happiness of my family is important." that's fine. That's very good. That would be a perfect sentence. But in this case, we cannot say: "The happiness is important." because we didn't specify which happiness. Okay? So, in this case, that's wrong, and this is correct. Okay? Now, the same principle applies to these. See if you can figure it out. Okay? "I want to make money." or "I want to make the money."? Which one do you think is right? Are we speaking in general, or are we speaking specifically? Well, we are speaking in general right now, so this is correct, because we're just talking about money; we didn't say which money. I want to make money. Right? General idea. If I said, for example: "I want to make the money I need to pay my rent." that's specific, so then I could say: "the money", because I'm explaining after that which money. Okay? But in this example, no. Next one: "She wants to lose weight." or "She wants to lose the weight."? Is it general or is it specific? What do you think? It's still general. Good. By now you're getting really smart. "She wants to lose weight." is a general term. Right? We're just talking about weight in general; not any specific weight. But if I say: "She wants to lose the weight she put on during the holidays." that's specific, and then I need "the". Okay? But not in this example. So, last one here: "He needs to earn respect." or do we say: "He needs to earn the respect."? Is it general or is it specific? By now you know, you'll really know. It's general. Very good. Okay? Because we didn't talk about any specific respect; we're talking about respect in general. So: "He needs to earn respect." But if this was being used, it would be something like: "He needs to earn the respect of his peers." Peers are people your age. Okay? Or: "He needs to earn the respect of his employees." for example, or "of his parents". Then it becomes specific. Which respect? The respect of his parents, the respect of his employees. All right? So, if it was specific, then we could say "the", but when we're just talking in general, we don't need "the". "Life is beautiful.", "Friendship is precious.", "Happiness is important.", "I want to make money.", "She wants to lose weight.", "He needs to earn respect."
Master AT, ON, IN with the TRIANGLE method
 
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No more confusion! Learn my simple trick to using "at", "on" and "in" for better English and higher grades. Master these common prepositons of time to speak and write more fluently. After watching, go get my free resource on the rules, expressions, and exceptions when using "at", "on" and "in" in English at https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/50-expressions-using-at-on-and-in-prepositions-of-time/ You can also take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/at-on-in-triangle-method/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. By the end of this lesson you will learn how to use three of the most confusing prepositions in English, and they are: "at", "on", and "in", as applied to time. Now, if you think you're alone in having problems with these little words, you are not alone. Many students have difficulty with these words because they're different in their native languages and probably in yours. Right? So, what do you do? Well, keep watching because I have found a solution which has helped many of my students, and I think it will help you, and that is by using a pyramid or a triangle-okay?-to learn these three important words. Let's see how it works. So, like the triangle: "at" is used in very specific situations, very narrow situations. For example: "At 5:00", "At 12:30", "At midnight", right? It's very exact. It's very narrow. "On", like the triangle, is a little bit broader and it's used for one day or one date. For example: "On Monday", or "On January 25th", "On New Year's Day". Right? Got it? Are you with me? Good. Let's continue. Now, "in" is the widest of the lot, as you can see, like in the triangle; "at", "on", "in". So, "in" covers things like months, seasons, years, decades, centuries, and any kind of long period. For example, we say in English: "In July", "In summer" or "In the summer", "In 2005", "In the 1960s", "In the 1800s", which was a long time ago, or: "In the past". We can also say: "In the future", okay? Because it's also a long period of time. Did you get that? So: "at" for very narrow situations; "on" for little bit wider, one day or one date-right?-and "in" for the widest situations of all, more than one day or one date. Now, let's do a little practice to see how well you've understood this. Okay, now let's fill in the blanks with our three words: "at", "on", and "in". But before we fill them in here, let's fill them in on our triangle. So, do you remember: What goes at the top, what's very narrow and covers a very specific time? "At", very good. What's a little bit more than that, covering one day or one date? "On", very good. And what's the widest of the lot, covering months, and seasons, and years, and decades, and centuries? "In", okay? You've got it. Now let's apply what we've learned, because otherwise there's no point, so let's do it. So: "_______ 6:00." What do we say? Do you remember? "At 6:00." Excellent. "_______ Sunday." One day, right? "On Sunday." Very good. "_______ winter." What do we say? It's a long period of time, especially in Canada where I live, okay? So: "In winter." We can also say: "In the winter." Same thing. And: "_______ Independence Day." It's one day, so we need to say: "On Independence Day." Okay? Very Good. Now let's continue to some sentences, because that's how you actually use the language. Number five: "See you _______ noon." "See you..." Now, what's "noon"? "Noon" means 12 o'clock in the afternoon, it's a precise, exact time, so we say: "See you at noon." Very good. Number six: "I'll call you _______ Friday." "I'll call you on Friday." Very good, because it was one day. Next one: "We have a meeting _______ 4:30." "We have a meeting", specific time, which one? "...at 4:30". Very good. And the last one: "They're getting married _______ March 9th." It's one day, okay? One date. So, it is this one: "They're getting married on March 9th." Okay? So, you can see that the triangle can help you to remember which preposition to use when. Now, here's some more things you can do to help you remember this really, really well. First of all, go to our website at www.engvid.com, and there you'll find a resource which I've written which explains all of this, and also you can print it out, you can download it for free. Everything is for free; no cost. Okay? And there you'll find exercises and explanations of this, and also an explanation of some exceptions and expressions that we use with "at", "on", and "in". There are about more than 50 of them. Okay? So you'll find the explanation of the triangle, plus more. Second, while you're at the website, www.engvid.com, you'll find hundreds of other lessons which can help you with your English. Okay? Lots and lots of lessons at different levels; beginner, intermediate, advanced, business English, pronunciation, grammar, IELTS, TOEFL, you name it. Okay? It's all available and it's all for free.
011 - a/an vs. the (Rule 2) English Articles - Beginning English Lesson - Basic English Grammar
 
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http://www.englishanyone.com/power-learning/ Learn to express yourself confidently in fluent English and sound like a native speaker with our FREE Power Learning video course! كيف تتعلم إنجليزي بسهولة Ты поняла разницу между 'a' и 'the'? With our latest video series, EnglishAnyone.com is attempting to pull off the seemingly impossible: we're going to teach English, to absolute beginners with no English speaking experience, IN English! This unique, revolutionary series throws out the usual English teaching conventions, parts with the traditional order in which grammar is taught and makes English accessible to anyone who wants to learn! For teachers curious to see how this is possible, and for students of any ability level who want to improve their English, welcome to English Anyone! Lesson 11 - Indefinite & Definite Articles 2 A & an are indefinite articles. The is the definite article. a/an vs the: Use a/an when you are selecting one of a group and the when there is only one of something. For more great tips and videos, and to get fluent in English faster with our FREE Email Video Course, visit us at http://www.englishanyone.com/
Views: 60550 EnglishAnyone
PUNCTUATION MASTERCLASS - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes - Comma, Semicolon, Period, Etc.
 
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Learn PUNCTUATION Easily in 30 Minutes in this Punctuation Masterclass. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU9lY1HF5Mc&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix In this lesson, you will learn the rules for using: - period/full stop (.) - exclamation mark (!) - question mark (?) - comma (,) - semicolon (;) - colon (:) - apostrophe (') Partial transcript: Hello, and welcome back. In this lesson, I’m going to teach you the rules for using the seven most important punctuation marks, so that you can write correct English without making mistakes. There are exercises within the lesson to help you practice, and as always there is a final quiz at the end of the video. So, if you’re ready, let’s begin. We’re going to start with terminal punctuation. ‘Terminal’ means the end, so terminal punctuation marks are what we use to end a sentence. There are three of these: the period or the full stop, the exclamation mark, and the question mark. Let’s look at the period first. This mark is called the period in American English (AmE means American English), and it’s called the full stop in British English. It is used to mark the end of declarative and imperative sentences. I’ll explain. Here are some examples: “I teach English.” “We had pizza for dinner last night.” “If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella.” These sentences are called declarative sentences because they declare something; they give us some information. And at the end of each sentence, you see a period or full stop. Imperative sentences are commands or requests: “Please don’t feed the animals.” You might see this on a sign in a zoo. “Let me know what time your flight arrives.” “If it rains tomorrow, bring your umbrella.” Let’s now turn to the exclamation mark. It is used to convey strong emotion or feeling. Have a look at these two sentences: Both of them mean the same thing. The first sentence, which ends in a period, has no special feeling or emotion; it’s like saying “I’m really excited about my new job.” Doesn’t sound like I’m very excited, does it? That’s why we use the exclamation mark: “I’m really excited about my new job!” – it tells our reader to read the sentence with emotion – in this sentence, the emotion is excitement. This next sentence: “If you come to work late tomorrow, you’re fired!” Imagine a manger saying this to an employee. So, this expresses anger. In the same way, you can show many other feelings including surprise, joy, fear etc. using the exclamation mark. Now, both of these sentences are declarative, but you can also use the exclamation mark in an imperative sentence like this one: “Johnny, don’t play with your food!” You can imagine a mother saying that angrily to her son. So, it’s a strong or strict command. Another place where we use the exclamation mark is after interjections. Here are a couple of sentences: “Ouch! You just stepped on my foot!” “Wow! What a beautiful house!” Interjections are words like “ouch” and “wow” which are used to express feelings. So, remember: if you want to convey strong emotion in a sentence, put an exclamation mark at the end of it. If there’s no special feeling, just end the sentence with a period. OK, let’s turn now to the third terminal punctuation symbol: the question mark. It is used to mark the end of a question. So, it’s very straightforward: if a sentence is a question, then put a question mark at the end of it. Here are some examples: “What do you do?” “Are we allowed to feed the animals?” “If it rains tomorrow, should I bring my umbrella?” “Are you excited about your new job?” “Who lives in that house?” So, the rule is: if a sentence is a question, it must end with a question mark. Alright, let’s do a small exercise now. There are four sentences on the screen. I want you to add periods or full stops, exclamation marks and question marks where necessary. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video and check. OK, here are the answers. If you want, stop the video again, check your answers, then play the video and continue. Before we move on to the next topic, a quick note on spacing. Notice that there is no space between the last letter of a sentence and the terminal punctuation mark. If you put a space there, it’s wrong. But, when you begin a new sentence, you should leave a space after the terminal mark, and you should start the new sentence with a capital letter.
Views: 359421 Learn English Lab
When NOT to use 'to' in English - Grammar
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ "I'm going to home" or I'm going to home"? "I'm going to school" or "I'm going to school?" Why do we use 'to' with some words and not with others? In this English grammar class, I'll teach you many words that don't go with 'to'. This is a mistake that sounds bad to native speakers, so try to learn these words and stop making this mistake! Go here to take a quiz on this lesson: http://www.engvid.com/when-not-to-use-to/ TRANSCRIPT "Are you going to home?" "Are you going home?" "Where are you going?" "What are you doing?" You're watching a video. My name's Ronnie. I'm going to teach you one trick. Finally, you will understand why in English, we say "I'm going to school" or "I'm going to work." But when we talk about our beautiful, warm, and cozy home we don't say "to". Why, why, why, I don't know. It's just English, isn't it? I can give you some clues. I'll give you some words. You will get this right away. It will be easy for you to do. So if you look at this sentence, "Are you going home?" A very, very big mistake that everyone says will be, "Are you going to home?" And I go, "No, no 'to'. Don't say 'to'. Don't say 'to', no!" Okay, okay, okay, "Are you going home?" Yes, don't say "to", but why? You learned that when you are going someplace, you say "to". For example, "Are you going to bed?" We don't say "to the bed", by the way. We just say bed. "Are you going to bed?" "Are you going to work?" Or you can use the past tense, "Did you go to work?" "Did you go to school?" "Did you go to engvid.com today, and check out a new lesson?" But when you say "home", you do not use "to". So you know the rule, maybe that this is a noun. This is a noun, so when you use going to a place which is a noun, you have to say "to", and then you come along, and you find this beautiful home, and Ronnie freaks out, because you say "to" and then you don't understand why. I don't know but I will give you a list of words that are places. But all of these words on this board, you cannot use with "to". So "are you going abroad?" You cannot ask someone, "Are you going to abroad?" If you look in the dictionary; the dictionary, one of those books. If you look at an online dictionary it'll tell you that these are adverbs of location, whereas the other ones you've learned are nouns. But hold on, "home" is a noun. Home is just this big exception going, "No, I am a noun. I don't want to have "to". All of these ones are not proper nouns, they're adverbs of location. Let's go through underground, underneath the surface of the land. If you have ever been to London, there's a big system called the Tube. It's also called the "underground". Most places in the world call it the "underground". In Canada, we call it the subway -- "sub" means "under". So you can say, "I'm going underground. I'm going underground." If you know The Jam -- "Wow, what an amazing band, Ronnie," I know. You will know this song called "I'm Going Underground." Maybe by the magic of video, we'll put on that video for you. "I'm going underground." "I'm going downtown," or you can say "uptown". I would just sing songs for everything, "Uptown Girls" -- little bit of Billy Joel for you. Uptown, downtown -- you don't need the "to". There, here, anywhere, nowhere, somewhere -- you don't need "to". In, inside, out, outside, upstairs, downstairs don't use "to". They're not nouns. They're places. One other thing to be very careful about, please, when you say this you want to say "upstairs" and "downstairs." Too many times I hear people say, "I went down-stair." Only one, just one stair, I made it. "I went up-stair." And then what did you do? You just stood there? Wow, don't say "down-stair, up-stair". Please use all of the stairs. Go up, okay? That'll be fun, more exciting. You can fall down the stairs too, that's fun. But again, we don't say "to". "I'm going downstairs." "I'm coming upstairs." If you are confused, or if you have ever been confused about when to use "to", the only advice I can give you is please remember this list of words. Once you have remembered this list, you'll go, "Oh that was easy." [That was easy.]" Yes, it was. Thank you, goodbye.
006 - a/an vs. the (Rule 1) English Articles - Beginning English Lesson - Basic English Grammar
 
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http://www.englishanyone.com/power-learning/ Learn to express yourself confidently in fluent English and sound like a native speaker with our FREE Power Learning video course! Learn basic English grammar! Ты поняла разницу между 'a' и 'the'? With our latest video series, EnglishAnyone.com is attempting to pull off the seemingly impossible: we're going to teach English, to absolute beginners with no English speaking experience, IN English! This unique, revolutionary series throws out the usual English teaching conventions, parts with the traditional order in which grammar is taught and makes English accessible to anyone who wants to learn! For teachers curious to see how this is possible, and for students of any ability level who want to improve their English, welcome to English Anyone! Lesson 6 - Indefinite & Definite Articles Understand English articles and learn when to use a, an and the. Uncountable nouns require no article: water, milk, rice, tea Countable nouns (and adjectives modifying nouns) that begin with consonants require "a": a pen, a book, a car, a cat Countable nouns (and adjectives modifying nouns) that begin with a vowel require "an": an apple, an egg, an umbrella, an octopus an = a "The" is used after a noun is introduced with "a" or "an". a cat. The cat is small. "The" is also used when describing something that both the speaker and the listener know about. I went to the park yesterday (the park both people usually go to). "The" is also used when there can only be one thing. He is the best. She is the tallest. Don't use "the" before: 1. the names of cities, towns, or states: Kyoto, Chicago, Houston 2. the names of streets: Madison Ave., King St. 3. the names of lakes and bays: Lake Michigan, Lake Ontario 4. the names of mountains: Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Fuji 5. the names of continents: Antarctica, South America 6. the names of islands: Kodiak Island, Oahu 7. the names of countries: Spain, Canada, Thailand (except for the Netherlands, the Bahamas, the United States, etc.) Do use "the" before: 1. names of rivers, oceans and seas: the Amazon, the Atlantic, the Red Sea 2. specific points on the Earth: the Prime Meridian, the South Pole, the Equator 3. geographical areas: the West Bank, the East Indies 4. deserts, forests, gulfs, and peninsulas: the Gobi Desert, the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Forest, the Texas Panhandle For more tips, lessons and videos, and to discover the 7 secrets to becoming a confident, fluent English speaker easily and automatically, visit us at http://www.englishanyone.com/.
Views: 112924 EnglishAnyone
Basic English Grammar - Have, Has, Had
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ By special request -- this lesson teaches you about the easily and often mixed-up English verb "have"!
English Sentence Structure - English Grammar Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about sentence structure in English. You’ll learn how to construct all kinds of sentences in English, from the simplest possible sentences, to long, complex sentences which contain many different ideas. Practice using correct sentence structure and post your example sentences in the comments! See the full version of this lesson on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/sentence-structure. In this lesson, you'll learn: - How to build simple sentences. - Using compliments. - Adding onto simple sentences to create more detailed sentence structure. - How to add description to your sentence. - How to make complex sentences with independent clauses. - How to make complex sentences with dependent clauses. To see more free English lessons like this one, visit our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 333759 Oxford Online English
English Grammar: The Prepositions ON, AT, IN, BY
 
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English for Beginners: Prepositions are short words that help us express location, time, and other relationships between people and things. Some examples of prepositions are: on, at, in, and by. Do you know how to use them? For example, do we say, "I am on a taxi" or "in a taxi"? Do you like to travel "in a plane" or "by plane"? After watching this simple but useful lesson, you will know exactly which preposition to use in any situation. Test yourself with our quiz: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-prepositions-on-at-in-by/ TRANSCRIPT I'm having a hard time reading on the train right now. Unh. Hold on. I'll start the lesson. Hi. James from engVid. Sorry, I was on the train. I want to teach you a lesson about four basic prepositions that we use in English that sometimes get confused, and I understand why, so I'll keep it basic. But because it's basic, it's going to be 80% correct. That's a good thing, that means you can go to the website and learn more from other lessons we have. But just know that sometimes there'll be exceptions, and I may not cover it here today. I'll even give you two exceptions to help you, but why waste time? Let's go to the board. Here's Mr. E. You'll notice he has a calendar, he has a clock, and: "You are here"? Oh, here. "Here" is a location. We're here right now, doing a lesson. That's the location: engVid. Let's go to the board and do the rest of the lesson, shall we? Here's: "at", "on", "in", and "by". "At". I love it because it's very specific, so you always know where you are, exactly. Problem: For transportation, "at" doesn't have anything. Hmm. So let's go to the next one. Let's go to "on". On. "On" is used for, let's say, large vehicles or large ways of travelling, such as buses... Sorry. Trains, buses, planes, and boats. I'll come back to boat in a second; it's an exception. On the train, on the bus, and on the plane, unless you're Bill Gates, Donald Trump, or me-I'm not in that list-you don't have your own train, plane, or bus, so you usually share it with a bunch of people or a few people. It's large. So we say: "You're on the bus", because it covers a big area, so there are many people sitting in that area. When I get to location, you'll see what I mean. Boat is a small exception. For many people in the world, they have their own boats because maybe they do fishing, or rowing, which is a type of boat that you go by yourself. In that situation, you can use "in". So, if the boat is small enough, say: "in": "I'm in a boat right now." But if it's a big boat, you have to say: "I'm on a boat." Another exception for the "on" rule is bicycle. You're always "on" a bicycle. I know, I said big vehicles, but remember: a bicycle is small, and it doesn't really have a motor or an engine, so we kind of give it its own thing, because you have to sit on the bicycle, and you can never really be in a bicycle. Is that good? Now, let's go to "in". "In" is funny because there are only two things for "in". "In" we use for car and taxi. The easy way to think about it is usually you own your own car; it doesn't belong to a group of people. People just don't get on your car every time you stop it, they go in and say: "Take me somewhere." And a taxi, well, when you're in a taxi, it is kind of your car. You pay the driver and you keep the car. So, this is one of those few cases where, because it belongs to me, I am in my car or I am in the taxi, because the taxi belongs to me as long as I pay the money. It's one of these funny exceptions. I don't know why, because you can put more people in a car, but I guess because you can actually own this transportation, it's yours. Think of it like the small boat. The small boat, one person is in it, you can be inside of it. All right? Cool. The last one we're going to do is "by". This is how you get there. So, "by" is different. When we talk about "in" and "on", you are... We are talking about how you are in the vehicle. Are you sitting on the bicycle? I can see you on it? You know, a boat is on water. But "by" just means: How did you get here? So, when someone responds to you with: "By car", "by plane", they're telling you how they got here. Not if they're in the plane, or on the plane. They are just... That's how they got there. So, how did I get here to do this video? Wouldn't you like to know. I'm kidding. I came here by car. So, yes, I was in my car and drove here, but I would tell somebody: "I got here by car, not by bus", and that would tell them the difference in the transportation I took. "How did you get here?" You like that? Good, so that's "by", this is how you did it; and the way you travelled is here, "in" and "on". Remember there is a small exception for small vehicles, so a small boat you can be in. Remember small. And a bicycle, you're always on the bicycle, because people see you sitting on it. We good? Excellent. Now, that is the lesson for transportation.
Basic English Grammar - Noun, Verb, Adjective, Adverb
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ What is a noun? What is a verb? What is an adjective? AHHHHH!!! Learn how to recognize nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in this important basic grammar lesson. Then test yourself with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/basics-noun-verb-adjective-adverb/
Mistakes in English speaking with – One of, Few of, Some of & All of – Improve spoken English
 
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✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI 👉 Check the latest Video - American Idioms I love to use the most? Mistakes in English speaking with – One of, Few of, Some of, None of & All of – Improve your spoken English http://www.learnex.in/mistakes-in-english-speaking-improve-spoken-english/ This is an English speaking lesson which is going to deal with the use of very common words like one of, a few of, some of, most of, none of and all of. This is a mistake that most people make while speaking English and is incorrectly used in spoken English by most of the English speakers. While learning English students find these phrases confusing and often make mistakes in English speaking while using them Let’s look at the first phrase “one of” in a sentence. Example: One of my books is missing. Now a lot of people do not add the “s” or the plural form of books. They don’t do so because they think that you can’t have “is” followed by the plural form of a noun. But actually you have to add an “s” to the noun when you are using “one of” and follow that noun by “is”. This is because the word “one” is the subject in this sentence. So, you have to use “is” after the noun. Example: A few of my books are missing. A few refers to 2 or more books. So you will use are and of course the plural form of the noun This is the same rule you apply when using some of, most of, none of and all of. Now this rule for these phrases only applies when we have countable nouns or nouns that you can quantify into individual units. Uncountable nouns: advice, news, things like butter, milk, water, rice.we can’t count these things. These nouns are always singular in their use of spoken English. Eg: Some of his advice is good. This same rule applies for most of, all of and none of. Which means you can replace some of with most of, all of and none of However, you can’t use one of and few of when using an uncountable noun. So, you can’t say -one of his advice is good or a few of his advice is good. Both are incorrect.
All Tenses - English Lesson
 
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In this English Grammar Lesson, we will review all Present, Past & Future tenses covered in my 'Learn English Tenses' series. Join my complete self-study programme to reach all your English language goals: https://anglo-link.com Exercise Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKfZTXh3kco Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Happy studies!
Views: 4993996 Anglo-Link
Omission of an Article | Top 4 Rules to Score More Marks in English for SSC & Bank Exams
 
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Get FREE T-Shirt on a purchase of Testbook Yearly Pass. (Limited T-Shirts Available) Register now : http://bit.ly/tbpass 😱 Crack GA & Banking Awareness with Financial Guru Abhijeet Sir - Videos, Quizzes, PDFs + Secret Strategies @Offer Price Rs.1299 Only! 💰 Hurry Up! 500 Seats Only! Click Here - http://bit.ly/bank-lc 😮😮 RRB Group D - 45 Tests + Bonus Content @Rs. 99 ONLY! 🤑🤑 Click this link: http://bit.ly/rrb-d SSC CGL Live Course Link: http://bit.ly/ssc-batch2 GS Foundation Pocket Course : Link : http://bit.ly/2MUAWMb Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EU6o0QLtrfY Class Schedule for 15th October 2018 8:00 AM - IBPS Clerk Prelims Class : http://bit.ly/2OTeF1j 11:30 AM - RRB Analysis Shift 1 : http://bit.ly/2NFbtSF 1:00 PM - SSC CGL English & Reasoning Class : http://bit.ly/2CFmGBj 3:00 PM - IBPS PO Prelims Quant Class : http://bit.ly/2IR3h0K 4:30 PM - IBPS PO English Class : http://bit.ly/2Pq23vM 5:30 PM - SSC GD Constable Class : http://bit.ly/2PvQUJM 7:30 PM - 15th October Current Affairs: http://bit.ly/2yA1Jn6 8:30 PM - IBPS PO Prelims Reasoning Class :http://bit.ly/2NBvedC Watch this video on “Omission of an Article” to learn top 4 rules to use articles in English vocabulary for SSC & Bank Exams. Score more marks in your exams with these English Tips. Being updated with such Tips will help you Top the English Section for various Banking and SSC Exams. We at Testbook, aim at helping you score well by providing all the study material required for Banking, Government and SSC exams. Watch more videos on English by clicking the links below: ~ Boost your English Vocabulary | The Hindu Part -2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3ByWhBiZJ8 ~ Boost your English Vocabulary | The Hindu Part -1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYdgFxjwOvs ~ Idioms & Phrases on Leads https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eeDQLMkuJk ~ Idioms & Phrases based on Bird https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDd2AH_CuVM ~ How to Crack English for SBI PO 2018 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuUbfIjMKtc ~ Most Repeated Questions on Tenses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sk4co8cn1dQ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Watch various videos on important topics of General Awareness by clicking the links below: ~CommonWealth Games 2018 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCCqLPFyIq8 ~ Oscar 2018 Winners - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1k1vBBsA0w ~ PNB Fraud https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILVFeHtwHEM ~ History of Banking in India https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7y6QMDlVXw ~ Key Financial Term https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPOW4yzC55NnTf2uUYLyAiTiwRD77f2lq ~Union Budget 2017-18 – Key Points from India’s Budget - https://testbook.com/blog/union-budget-2017-key-points-india/ ~ Major Rajput Dynasties - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn4u0fYsRVI ~ Important Indian Satellites - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kRq3GKUG3k ~ History of South Indian Kingdom - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Beinm9pp2EI ~ Common Chemical Compounds - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKXi4bbGMcc ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- You can also read several articles on Static GK & boost your exam preparation by clicking the link below: ~ Prominent Rulers of India - https://testbook.com/blog/prominent-rulers-of-india/ ~ Complete List of Oscar winners 2017 - https://testbook.com/blog/oscars-winners-2017-complete-list/ Moreover, visit Testbook Blog to find more such articles & boost your exam preparation. Stay tuned with Testbook’s YouTube channel and other socials (FB, Twitter, Instagram) to get instant updates on job notifications, current affairs, test series, free tests, recent exams and much more. Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/testbookdotcom/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/Testbookdotcom/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/testbookdotcom/ Download Testbook App - http://bit.ly/testbookmobileapp Download Current Affairs App - http://bit.ly/testbookCA
Views: 7125 Testbook.com
Basic English Grammar - "Was" and "Were"
 
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http://www.engvid.com When to use WAS and when to use WERE. Learn about the past tense of TO BE -- the most important verb in English! I talk about normal sentences, negatives, and questions. I cover the grammar, but also the correct pronunciation. After you've watched the lesson, test yourself at http://www.engvid.com/was-were/#quiz!
Use of articles A/An/The || Articles in English Grammar || Rules,And Examples in Hindi
 
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This video will help you to improve your English and grammar and you will learn in this video how to use articles in English grammar
Basic English Grammar: Parts of Speech – noun, verb, adjective, pronoun, adverb...
 
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In this video, I will go over the different parts of speech in English. We will be looking at the use of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs. You will also learn how to arrange them in a grammatically correct sentence. Also, I will teach you in what order to place the adjectives if you have more than one. For example, do you have a "big, white, excitable dog" or a "white, excitable, big dog"? Find out by watching this lesson and doing the quiz afterwards at https://www.engvid.com/basic-english-grammar-parts-of-speech/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. James from engVid. I would like to talk about something that will help you understand English, and it's two things. Number one are parts of speech. What are the parts of speech and how do you use them? The second is called syntax, which is a very complicated word for word order. Where do you put the words in a sentence? In some languages they have a different word order, some languages it doesn't really matter, but what my job today is, is to show you where the words go and: What do they basically mean-okay-in the parts of speech? As E said: "Words. Where do they go?" Now, if you're new to English or even if you're an intermediate student, sometimes this causes you problems. Right? You've heard the terms: "preposition", "determiner", "syntax", and you're like: "Oh, it's so complicated." Today's lesson will be simple. You can go over this again and again. It will help you understand and use English better. So I'm going to start off with the most basic part of parts of speech, and I want to start with the things part. Things. Not actions, but things. I am a person. My watch is a thing. Okay? An animal, a cat or a dog, or an apple, these are things. We call these things nouns, because nouns name people - Hi, I'm James; places - Toronto, Ontario; things - my watch; animals - a cat, meow; and food - an apple. Okay? These are nouns. Example: boy, dog, apple. Okay? Nouns name these things. But sometimes you don't want to keep using the same noun again and again. "James ate the apple and James walked his dog as James talked to his friend, Oliver, and then James..." It gets what we call repetitive and boring, and it also makes the sentences go really slow. And sometimes we want to use the noun in a different way. So in this case we introduce what's called pronouns. Pronouns can replace nouns in a sentence. So now you could say something like this: "James ate the apple and he walked his dog." Instead of: "James ate the apple and James walked his dog", we can use a pronoun to replace it and make it simpler. We still know we're talking about James. Now, we talked about word order or syntax. Let me explain this. In order to use a pronoun first you must use the noun. Okay? You introduce the noun and then you can replace it with a pronoun. That's why you see number one then number two. You cannot just start with a pronoun. If I started a sentence at the beginning: "He went to the store." The very first thing you will say to me is: "Who's he?" I go: "Oh, James went to the store and he bought the apples there." And you go: "Oh, now I know who he is." So, pronouns kind of number two because you have to actually introduce first with a noun, then you can replace it with a pronoun. Now, we have several types of pronouns. I'm just going to go over and show you a couple of them so you get an idea. Pronouns include: "I", "we", which are subject pronouns. Object pronouns when we're talking about something that's not us, but something on the other side that receives action, as a subject pronoun I do things. I run. Right? We eat dinner. We're talking to them. Now, when we say "them", you go: "What?" Well, they are receiving it and we call those object pronouns. Okay? So the most basic ones are subject and object pronouns. One is doing something, one is receiving. There are reflexive pronouns, like: "himself" where somebody is talking about themselves. "He built the house himself." So he's talking about him as an object, but reflecting it back to himself. We call it reflexive pronoun. Okay? There are others, but I'm not going to get into them right now because I want to keep this simple just so you know what the parts of speech are, and you can always come to engVid to come and see other lessons in which we go deeply into reflexive pronouns, object and subject pronouns. Okay? Cool. So we talked about how pronouns can replace nouns, and we're good with that. Yeah? So let's go to stage number three, because once you've replaced them, how do you know the difference between them? Apple, apple. I don't know. That's when we have adjectives. Adjectives. The word itself can be broken into two parts: "ject" and "ad". But remember... Do you remember when I said subject and object, and I gave you the example? I said, for instance: "I" is a subject pronoun. Right? Subject, yeah, I'm good at this.
English Grammar: a / an + Noun
 
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Start with the simple English articles 'a' and 'an'. This is basic English grammar that you must know. You must be able to know when to use 'a' or 'an'. For example: an apple, a banana ———————————— Join Us to Support Us! ———————————— https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_OskgZBoS4dAnVUgJVexcw/join ———————————— Check us out! ———————————— Please support us through Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ShawEnglish Website: http://www.shawenglish.com Official Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/shawenglish/ Learn English With Robin (Facebook Group) https://www.facebook.com/groups/162048911162706/ Learn English With Robin (Whatsapp, Skype, Line, WeChat, KakaoTalk) https://shawenglish.com/skype-online-english-lessons/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shawenglishonline/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ShawEnglishNow Naver Café (네이버 카페): http://cafe.naver.com/shawenglish ———————————— Message from Robin Shaw ———————————— Hello, I am Robin Shaw. Thank you for watching my videos. I’m a Canadian who lives in Korea, but loves to travel to many countries and meet students. I have been an English teacher for almost 20 years. I love teaching students from around the world. Please help and support this channel by subscribing, commenting, sharing, and clicking ‘like’ on my videos. ———————————— My Other Channel ———————————— If you are interested in Korea, this is my other YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ConnectKoreaMedia Website: http://www.connectkorea.com Official Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/connectkorea/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/connectkorea/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ConnectKoreaNow
Views: 237490 Shaw English Online
How to use  A and An for kids / Use Articles A and An correctly /6 easy rules in Bengali
 
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This video aims at how to use A and An for kids. Just use Articles A and An correctly in 6 easy ways discussed here in Bengali. Actually how to use A and An Articles in Grammar focuses here on 6 easy rules for the use of Articles A and An. At the same time , here you can have an idea about Vowels and Consonants. The general rule is : A is used before Consonant sound and An is used before Vowel sound . But there are some variations that are briefly discussed in the video. So I think, this video shows how easily we can learn about the use of Articles A and An .... Please, watch this video and express your views by commenting below. . Now please, watch this video and advise me what to do to make a good video on this subject…. . If you like this humble presentation, please hit the like button. It will be a great encouragement to me. Please , subscribe my channel that is dedicated for you. This channel aims at to present videos on how to do anything essential for our life including some unboxing videos. . So please SUBSCRIBE✔ ….LIKE✔…..COMMENT✔…. SHARE✔ . Thanks a lot. …………………………………. yours How To Do plus Unboxing . Music Background: Amazing Grace 2011 - Classical Whimsical by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100820 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ . #AandAn , #UseoOfArticles , #HowToUseAandAn
How to write a basic paragraph
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ A writing lesson for absolute beginners! Here are four very basic rules you must follow when writing simple paragraphs. Learn the basics -- capitals, indentation, line spacing, and more. Then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-basic-paragraph/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. Do you know how to write a basic paragraph? This is not only for ESL students. This is for everyone around the world, even if you speak English, even if you don't speak English. This is a very, very beautiful, basic lesson on how to write small, short, beautiful paragraphs. "How to Write a Basic Paragraph". Now, I also want you to be very careful. This is not how to write a 200-word essay for your university exam. We don't have enough time in the world for me to teach you that, and I probably forget. So this is, very simply, how to write a basic English paragraph. One, two, three, four rules. Rule No. 1 is: Indent, indent. What does "indent" mean? Indent, basically, means -- I learned this when I was a child -- you take your finger. You can have a big finger, a small finger -- I don't care. You take your finger or two fingers, and you make a little space like so. This is called an "indentation" or "indent". So "indent" means you leave a space at the very first line of the paragraph. And that's it. You do not leave a space at any other lines in the paragraph, only the first line. So it's very important that you only indent the first line of your paragraph like so. Okay. The next thing that you have to do is you have to use a capital letter at the beginning of every sentence. Now, the word that I've written is "I". Another rule in English is that every single time you write "I", it must be a capital. So I'm going to write an example sentence for you to illustrate what I mean: "I am a teacher." Okay? This is one sentence. So rule No. 3: At the end of my sentence, I must use a period. A "period" is a dot, if you'd like. So "I am a teacher." So what I'm going to do is my next sentence... I'm going to begin it with a capital letter. "My" -- so I want to say, "My name -- My name is Ronnie." So what I've done: Rule No. 1, indent. Rule No. 2, you have to use a capital letter at the beginning of every new sentence. Rule No. 3, you're going to use a period at the end of each sentence so that the person reading your beautiful paragraph knows when to stop and take a break. For example, if I did not have a period here, I'd say, "I'm a teacher my name is Ronnie." You need to break up your ideas. So one sentence has one thought and one period. "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie." Next one. No. 4. I see this in a lot of students' writing. The two basic things about a paragraph are the form and the content. The form is the most important. The form is the indentation. And don't use point form. Do you know what "point form" is? If you're typing something on Word or on an email, "point form" is also called "bullets", which [makes shooting sounds]. So "bullet" means you would put each new sentence on a new line. So if I was to write this: "I'm a teacher", then I would put my next sentence here. This is not how to make a paragraph. This is "point form". So this is a bad paragraph. What I'm going to do is I'm going to write until I almost reach the end of the page. Don't write past the end of the page because then you're writing on the desk and it gets messy. So "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie. I live -- so I'm going to use up all of my line until the end -- I live in Canada." What would you like to know about Canada? "Canada is very cold." In the winter. So as you can see by my example, I only stop my sentence at the end of my paper. I don't use each sentence on each line. So four basic things to remember when you're writing a basic English paragraph. The first one is: Indent the first line of your paragraph only. Use a capital letter at the beginning of each new line or each new sentence. And use a period at the end. Also, don't forget: Don't use point form. "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie. I live in Canada. Canada is very cold. Go to 'Subscribe' on YouTube so you can find more great lessons like this." Goodbye.
English Grammar Course For Beginners:  Basic English Grammar
 
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Hello here is a great and free English grammar course taught by Esther. Esther is an American teacher from California. It is the best video course for beginner students. Esther teaches English articles, pronouns, prepositions, adjectives, etc. This video is perfect to help you improve your English speaking, listening, writing, and reading. ———————————— Join Us to Support Us! ———————————— https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_OskgZBoS4dAnVUgJVexcw/join 0:00 Beginner English Introduction 0:57 Vowels and Consonants 5:57 a/an + Noun 11:26 Singular / Plural Nouns 20:45 Subjective Pronouns 26:53 Subjective Pronouns + Be 33:44 Subjective Pronouns + Be + Not 38:43 'be' Verb Pronoun Questions 49:54 Review #1 - Subjective Pronouns 53:12 Grammar Check Up #1 58:55 What + Be Verb Questions 1:03:43 This / That 1:07:32 These / Those 1:11:58 This / That / These / Those Practice 1:13:47 Possessive Adjectives 1:21:46 Possessive Pronouns 1:27:04 Grammar Check Up #2 1:34:16 Articles + Noun 1:40:47 Prepositions: in / on / under 1:45:44 Beginner Adjectives 1:50:13 Grammar Check Up #3 1:57:41 Have / Has 2:01:59 Don't / Doesn't Have Questions 2:06:26 Do / Does Have Questions 2:10:42 Grammar Check Up #4 ———————————— Check us out! ———————————— Please support us through Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ShawEnglish Website: http://www.shawenglish.com Official Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/shawenglish/ Learn English With Robin (Facebook Group) https://www.facebook.com/groups/162048911162706/ Learn English With Robin (Whatsapp, Skype, Line, WeChat, KakaoTalk) https://shawenglish.com/skype-online-english-lessons/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shawenglishonline/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ShawEnglishNow Naver Café (네이버 카페): http://cafe.naver.com/shawenglish ———————————— Message from Robin Shaw ———————————— Hello, I am Robin Shaw. Thank you for watching my videos. I’m a Canadian who lives in Korea, but loves to travel to many countries and meet students. I have been an English teacher for almost 20 years. I love teaching students from around the world. Please help and support this channel by subscribing, commenting, sharing, and clicking ‘like’ on my videos. ———————————— My Other Channel ———————————— If you are interested in Korea, this is my other YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ConnectKoreaMedia Website: http://www.connectkorea.com Official Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/connectkorea/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/connectkorea/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ConnectKoreaNow
Views: 1869166 Shaw English Online
Writing in English - Comma Splices & 4 easy ways to fix them
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Do you know what a comma splice is? Learn about one of the most common writing mistakes that students make and four easy ways to correct it. This free lesson will help you to become a better writer. You can also test yourself with the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/comma-splices/ !
Prepositions of PLACE  👉  IN / ON / AT / BY  👈  Common English Grammar Mistakes
 
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English prepositions: These tiny words are so important! But they can be a little confusing at times too, right? In this video, Emma explains how to use them when giving information about PLACE. Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/10/03/prepositions-of-place-in-on-at-by/ *I recommend* ⭐️Speak with native teachers... 30mins every day! Get a free 14-day trial here: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO! Do your friends a favour and help to translate this lesson into your native language! Contribute subtitles translations here: https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=XzkbcWh8s4w mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRiVfHqBIIvSgKmgnSY66g?sub_confirmation=1 Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 1755057 mmmEnglish
What are Articles | When to use A, An and The | Type of Adjectives
 
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Article are words used before noun and they modifies noun. There are three articles in English, 'a','an' and 'the'. There are two types of Articles : Definite Articles and Indefinite Articles. 'the' comes in definite article. 'a and an' comes in indefinite article Usage of 'A' and 'An' Use 'a' when word start with a consonant sound and 'an' when word starts with a vowel sound. Watch the entire video to understand the similarity and differences between both of them. Please watch below video to understand in detail about different Grammar Topics. Forms of Verbs : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bbh3Kw5Jfwg&t=418s Non Finite Verbs | Infinitives | Bare Infinitives | When to Use? https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=NDLBWf7UfIM What is Gerund | Why to use Gerund | When to use Gerund | Verbal Noun | Q&A https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=1Oo99ehNYEM Verbs | Main Verb and Auxiliary Verb. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z96-ZkIpQZQ&t=42s Verbs | Transitive and Intransitive Verbs | Similarity | Differences https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUFo94TXwqc&t=95s Seven Types of Pronoun : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vOIYm9iTaU Subject, Object and Verb : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRBT4JLelA4&index=5&list=PLMfo9NXs6ZfHIcdGPq4TtfPxRm873Bh0r https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-Hum-UbOt8&index=6&list=PLMfo9NXs6ZfHIcdGPq4TtfPxRm873Bh0r Parts of Speech series : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNC9_f1oFuE&list=PLMfo9NXs6ZfHIcdGPq4TtfPxRm873Bh0r Use of Capital Letters : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDRlDCz2ikQ Phrases vs Clauses https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=-a80_xFsh9w Types of Clauses https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=8dT_MlElHo8 Types of Sentences based on meaning https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=rl85jxktfms Conjunction https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=XZVDRAmMHTA Active vs Passive Voice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXQkFacZvS4&list=PLMfo9NXs6ZfHpKWcK9k9Fl-_7k7N9D4WK&index=1 Video playlist related to Tenses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMfo9NXs6ZfF8BR44-taFznyxImfsuvEa
Views: 492 Nihir Shah
Subject Verb Agreement Rules Part 2 IBPS SSC English Grammar
 
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अगर English Grammar के Subject Verb Agreement को नहीं समझा तो IBPS SSC CPO जैसा कोई भी Competitive Exam की English कर पाना मुश्किल ही नहीं असम्भव है। Lesson 24: Subject Verb Agreement for Competitive Exams https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6lS-vakv_E76Ill-AUH-g9 Website: https://www.englishwale.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/englishwaledotcom/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spoken_english_guru_adityarana/ Daily Use Sentences Book - https://bit.ly/2Mviw4m Spoken English Guru Book - https://bit.ly/2wcc0oS Spoken English Guru Android App: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=in.qtime.spokenenglishguru All Video Lectures’ Pen Drive - http://bit.ly/2wlxv6N Free PDF eBook: http://bit.ly/2LYwO8q All English CHARTs: http://bit.ly/2LVtbAd Lesson-wise Video Lectures: http://bit.ly/2N108Qe Lesson-wise Practice Exercises: http://bit.ly/2Mz4XRI “Spoken English Guru” Channel Lesson-wise Videos (250+ Videos) Link: Lesson 1: English Basics & Parts of Speech https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox569k1T00UH7zdw0ZETatLz Lesson 2: Simple Sentences - Present, Past & Future https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4xqm9T72J1D6I2IqLG4cJr Lesson 3: All TENSES in English https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4evkxrt2AnfXpndrYtEo5Q Lesson 4: Modal Helping Verbs in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6FoHE30D7mAk5DylqVR81O Lesson 5: All Prepositions in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5sd3o3RZE9HJcZ_crRvBYG Lesson 6: All Conjunctions in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5cy2xkIQknyfyd9PSxR3JY Lesson 7: Daily Use English Sentences https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5WZDOosR7ihWooeFwnT8Hf Lesson 8: Vocabulary Exercises https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7Ny0kgrgXfoltFX8zxMr10 Lesson 9: Daily English Speaking Practice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5RSgM5wsAbCbTMXi9AAJFh Lesson 10: Hindi to English Translation Videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4myjPpnomQnvU37GUbXE2s Lesson 11: Newspaper Article English to Hindi Translation https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6n6xk9pPe1xUc3VhAB6Ra0 Lesson 12: Active and Passive Voice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7M4w-k72XtRwP5OlZEXT_j Lesson 13: Be Being Been | Concept & Use https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5o2yrhbITHJ1T2RbuImFDn Lesson 14: Important English Grammar Topics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox53AvjielYUoRlaO_cuBDQb Lesson 15: Gerund, Infinitives and Participles https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5DdSQoWpx85VqxzMr8Rbkf Lesson 16: Phrasal Verbs in English https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4N0emQQe7ZjjzwbcB9jRdQ Lesson 17: English Practice Exercises & Test Papers https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6AvA4NUZyNCpfMXIXwDSNq Lesson 18: Students' Doubt Clearing Sessions https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7gZn51MoIEMOvLd36mzdKl Lesson 19: English Conversations https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5BU_Hkqwp7v7UdW9X5_-rh Lesson 20: How to Talk in English with Kids https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7JDlK6GUD3KkyqzbdGZSXm Lesson 21: English Listening Practice Lesson https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5b-qNJZTsRYqUqGmOsb9N1 Lesson 22: English Sound & Pronunciation Videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4CdWX12bGL396YGeIEhqiS Lesson 23: "Do You Know Module?" | English Lesson https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5jCZrLMal3-d4Al5yHwYD7 Lesson 24: Subject Verb Agreement for Competitive Exams https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6lS-vakv_E76Ill-AUH-g9 #ibps #ssc #sscenglish #subjectverbagreement #spokenenglishguru
Views: 38128 Spoken English Guru
Correct Use of WILL and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs WILL and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 See CONDITIONALS lessons here: https://goo.gl/YvhnwK For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: ‘Will’ and ‘would’. These two verbs cause a lot of confusion for English learners. So, in this video, I’m going to clear up that confusion for you. I will teach you the difference between these two modal verbs, and I’ll show you how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end to test your understanding. Alright, there are three main differences between ‘will’ and ‘would’. Let’s start with the most basic use of the two verbs. We use the verb ‘will’ to talk about the future. One very common use is to make a prediction, or say what we expect to happen in the future. Take this sentence: We will be in Hong Kong by 8 pm tomorrow. That means, we are traveling to Hong Kong and I expect that if our flight is on time, we will be there by 8 o’ clock tomorrow night. This next sentence also talks about the future but it’s a little different. I’m not hungry, so I will just have an orange juice. Imagine that you’re sitting in a restaurant with a friend and you say this. Here, you’re not talking about the distant future, you’re talking about the immediate future. In other words, here ‘will’ is used to express a decision that you have made. We also use ‘will’ to make a promise to someone: I’ll send you all the details by email. So, I’m promising to do something for you. OK, so that’s ‘will’. What about ‘would’? Well, ‘would’ is simply the past tense form of ‘will’. So imagine that we didn’t reach Hong Kong by 8 pm. Our flight was late. We only reached there at 2 in the morning. So then, we might look back at the past and say: We thought we would be in Hong Kong by 8 pm. But that didn’t happen. We often use ‘would’ when we report a past conversation – that is, we say what someone said in the past. For example: I wasn’t hungry, so I said that I would just have an orange juice. It’s the same sentence that we saw with ‘will’, but changed to the past tense. And the last sentence becomes: She said she would send me all the details by email. OK, now you know the basic use of ‘will’ and ‘would’. So let’s look at a more challenging use of these two verbs. This is the area of most confusion for people, and it is conditionals. That means sentences where you have a condition and a result. For example: If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella. That’s pretty easy. You see that I’m talking about something I will do in the future (“I’ll bring my umbrella”), but only on one condition – “if it rains.” Here’s another one: If Jared stops playing video games, his grades will improve. What do you understand by that? Well, it means that Jared probably spends a lot of time playing video games, so his grades are not very good. But if he stops playing video games, then he can spend more time studying, and we expect that his grades will improve. In both of these sentences, we’ve used ‘will’. And that is because both of these are real situations (these are both possible). This type of sentence is called the first conditional. But sometimes, we want to talk about imaginary or unreal situations. For example: If I had wings, I would fly all over the world. Obviously, this is not possible. I can’t grow wings, so all I’m doing is I’m using my imagination. Notice that we have used the past tense throughout this sentence – ‘If I had wings,’ – ‘I would fly’. We’re not talking about the past, but this past tense, including ‘would’, just shows that this is not real – it’s imaginary. Now, let’s go back to Jared and his video game addiction. What if I said: If Jared stopped playing video games, his grades would improve. It’s similar to the sentence with ‘will’, but using the past tense (with ‘would’) just shows that I don’t think this is possible. Jared is not going to stop, he’s just going to keep playing video games, and his grades are never going to improve. Remember, with ‘will’ it’s possible, with ‘would’ it’s not possible, it’s imaginary. And this type of sentence is called the second conditional. But there’s one more – the third conditional. This is used to talk about past conditions. Imagine that Jared had his exam, and as we expected, his grades were poor. So then we can say: If Jared had stopped playing video games, his grades would have improved. So here, we’re talking about a condition in the past. Notice that we say ‘had stopped’ (this is the past perfect tense) in the condition, and we use ‘would have’ in the result.
Views: 577068 Learn English Lab
Definite and Indefinite Articles in English A, An, The How to use articles 'a', 'an', and 'the'?
 
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An orange or the orange? Definite and Indefinite Articles in English A, An, The How to use articles 'a', 'an', and 'the'? Noun indefinite article (plural indefinite articles) (grammar) A word preceding a noun to indicate that the noun refers to any member of the class of objects named by the noun. Noun definite article (plural definite articles) (grammar) An article that introduces a noun and specifies it as the particular noun that is being considered; in English, the only definite article is the. Skype: agharta78 The Definitive Collection: English Prepositions Solved Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Definitive-Collection-Prepositions-Real-World-Examples-ebook/dp/B00D48GQO4 Paperback: http://www.amazon.com/Definitive-Collection-English-Prepositions-Grammar/dp/1493775367/
Views: 2687 THIS IS NOT GRAMMAR
आसानी से सीखें Tenses | Learn Tenses in English Grammar with Examples in Hindi - by Him-eesh
 
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►Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZQDF0x18Xe6RZayvod99zA/?sub_confirmation=1 Become master of English Tenses by watching this video on english grammar tenses with examples in Hindi. This video will help you understand basics of english grammar and in depth knowledge of tenses along with grammar rules. This english speaking video on tenses in Hindi is aimed to help you in understanding that how to make english sentence in hindi and speak english fluently. This video on english grammar in hindi will also help you to practice english speaking and tenses as lot of example shave been provided in this grammatical video. If you wish to learn english, you need to understand tenses and rules of grammar. This purpose will be solved by this video as we help you to learn english through hindi in our various videos. We wish to improve your spoken english, and we will keep making video to help you practice english speaking and be able to speak english confidently and fluently. Many of the viewers requested us to make video on basic english grammar in hindi and we will surely keep making many more videos to improve english grammar and practice it with examples. Please mention your view about this video on tenses in Hindi and also suggest more topics which you want us to cover in our full course on english speaking. Curated by: Team Himeesh All the Best. ►Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/himeeshmadaan/ ►Like Us On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/himeeshmadaan/ ►Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/himeeshmadaan You can watch more related videos: ► Easiest way to learn English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDL3HLfVERs ► 20 Daily use English words: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dA0G6DdzRQs ► How to speak superfast English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gccfq9K4R5c #tenses #learnenglishgrammar #himeeshmadaan
Views: 10324678 Him-eesh Madaan
HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN - How to Use These Forms Correctly (with Examples) - English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use have been / has been / had been correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. Most Common MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://goo.gl/n8BJ7v 2. HAVE HAD / HAS HAS / HAD HAD: https://goo.gl/Aj3hRD 3. SHOULD HAVE / COULD HAVE / WOULD HAVE: https://goo.gl/X2bw7J 4. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://goo.gl/oC2qKX 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://goo.gl/A3VuGh 6. All MODAL VERBS lessons: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 Transcript: ‘Have been’, ‘has been’ and ‘had been’. These forms cause a lot of confusion for many people. Well, in this video, I will clear up that confusion. I’m going to teach you the three main uses of these forms how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. Alright, let’s get started. Before we talk about the uses, you need to know the basics of where to use have, has and had been: in the present, if the subject of a sentence is I/You/We/They or a plural noun, then we use ‘have been’. If the subject is He/She/It or a singular noun, then we use ‘has been’. This is when we talk about the present. When we talk only about the past, it’s very easy. For any subject, we use ‘had been’. OK, let me test you: what do we use with He/She/It or a singular noun in the present? We use ‘has been’. What about with I/You/We/They or plural nouns? We use ‘have been’. And in the past tense? We use ‘had been’ for all subjects. Good, so let’s now look at the first use of these forms. This is in the present perfect tense. That is, to talk about actions or situations that started in the past and are still continuing. Here’s an example: “I have been working as a teacher for 7 years.” In speech, we usually shorten ‘I have’ to ‘I’ve’ – “I’ve been working as a teacher for 7 years.” Let’s look at a timeline for this. You know that I started working as a teacher seven years ago (or in 2010 because at the time of filming this video, right now, it’s 2017), and I’m still a teacher, so this action – ‘working’ is continuing. In this sentence, we can also say: “I have been working as a teacher since 2010.” The difference between ‘for’ and ‘since’ is that if you want to mention the duration (or amount of time), then you use ‘for’ (like ‘for 7 years’). If you want to mention the starting point of the action or situation, use ‘since’ (as in ‘since 2010’). Here’s another example: let’s say that this lady wants to see the doctor. Her appointment was at 3 o’clock. She came to the hospital at 3, but the doctor wasn’t there. So she started waiting at 3 o’clock and she’s still waiting – let’s say it’s 5 o’clock now, so two hours have passed. So what can we say? We can say: “She has been waiting for two hours.” or “She has been waiting since 3 o’clock.” In natural speech, we say he‘s been and she’s been: “She’s been waiting”. OK have a look at this sentence: “He has been the CEO of the company for four months” or we can say ‘since June’ because that’s when he started. Here, we don’t have an –ing verb like ‘working’ or ‘waiting’. That’s because we don’t want to focus on any action, we just want to express the situation – that he became the CEO in June and he’s still the CEO. Here’s another example: “They’ve been married for 25 years / since 1992.” When did they get married? In 1992. Are they still married now? Yes. So, they’ve been married for 25 years now. OK, so what about ‘had been’? Well, let’s change our sentences a little bit: “I had been working as a teacher for 7 years when I quit my job.” Ah, we see a different meaning here. It means that I started working as a teacher at some point in the past, I was a teacher for 7 years, but then I quit. So now, I am no longer a teacher. I want you to notice that there are two past actions here: one continuous action (“I had been working as a teacher”) and a single finished action at the end of that (“I quit”). Compare this to the previous sentence – “I have been working as a teacher” – here, there is only one continuous action and it’s still continuing, it’s not finished. So, please remember this rule: only use ‘had been’ if there were two events in the past: a continuing action or a situation and a single, finished action. So let’s go back to the other sentences. With these, we can say: “She had been waiting for two hours when the doctor finally arrived.” “He’d been the CEO of the company for only four months when it went bankrupt.” ‘Went bankrupt’ means the company lost all its money and closed down. “They had been married for 25 years when they divorced.” So are they still married? Unfortunately, no. Just like the sentences with ‘have been’ and ‘has been’ are in the present perfect tense, the sentences with ‘had been’ are in the past perfect tense.
Views: 1546128 Learn English Lab
8 English Sentences: Find the Mistakes
 
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Can you find the mistakes in these English sentences? In today's lesson, you'll review 8 grammar rules of correct English sentences. You'll get to practice correcting sentences with me in the video. Once you learn these easy grammar rules, you'll avoid making common mistakes and improve your marks on English essays and exams like IELTS, TOEFL, and TOEIC. To test if you really understand these rules, take the quiz. Good luck with your English! http://www.engvid.com/8-english-sentences-find-the-mistakes/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, my name's Rebecca. For the next few minutes, let's pretend you are the English teacher and you're correcting your student's homework. Let's look at some of these sentences and see if you can find some of the errors in these English sentences. Okay, the first sentence: "My mother she works in a bank." Is that okay? Well, let me tell you right now that actually none of these sentences are okay; there is a mistake in every sentence. So see if you can find the mistake. Okay? "My mother she works in a bank." What's the mistake? Okay... Here, "she", all right? I'm just going to grab a different marker. So what happened here is we said: "My mother she works in a bank." So we cannot repeat the subject. The mistake here is that we had a double subject; the subject was mentioned twice. In English, you can't do that. You just mention the subject once. So this sentence, in order to be correct, would need to be: "My mother works in a bank." Or: "She works in a bank." If you know who "she" is. Right? But you can't say both. So no double subjects. Number two: "John is an engineer" What's wrong with that? Look carefully. Well, what's wrong is that it's missing the punctuation. All right? Part of a correct sentence is correct punctuation. So here, there was no period at the end of the sentence, that's what was wrong. Next sentence: "The manager of my department" What's wrong with that? Well, what's wrong is that it's not a sentence because it doesn't have any verb, there's no verb there. Okay? And, of course, you need to continue this sentence, and then eventually you'd need to have some punctuation as well. But basically, there is no... This is a sentence fragment. This is called only a part of a sentence. It is not a complete English sentence or a correct English sentence. There is no verb. Missing verb. Next one: "we enjoy watching old movies." Okay? Again, look carefully. What's wrong there? Well, it has a subject, it has a verb, but this is the problem. The first letter in the first word of an English sentence has to be capitalized and that's what was missing here. You see, we didn't have that problem before. Okay. Next one: "I like very much Chinese food." Okay? Maybe that sounds okay to you, but doesn't sound okay to me. It's close, but not quite. What's wrong? Well, what's wrong here is this, the word order. Not only do you need to have certain elements, you need to have the words in the right order. So in English, the correct order for this sentence would be: "I like Chinese food very much." Okay? Not: "very much Chinese food." "I like Chinese food very much." Okay? Next: "Maria need help with her hw." "Maria need help with her homework." What's wrong there? Okay? So the mistake is here, the mistake is in subject-verb agreement. The verb has to agree with the subject. Right? And if we say: "Maria", it's like: "she", and we would have to say: "She needs". "Maria needs help with her hw." So the error here was in subject-verb agreement. Next one: "delivered the package yesterday" Okay? "delivered the package yesterday" What's wrong here? Well, it's similar to this one, except here, we had a sentence fragment and we had the subject. Here, we have a sentence fragment, and we have a verb, but we don't have a subject. We have a missing subject. So this is also a sentence fragment. "Fragment" means only part. It is not a complete sentence. Next one: "We recieved your letter." "We recieved your letter." Sounds fine, but if you're an English teacher, you're going to look really carefully at each of the words. And what's wrong is here, the mistake is here. It's a spelling mistake. Okay? The word "received" is one of those tricky words with the "e" and the "i", and the "i" and the "e" that you have to learn very well. So spelling mistakes will also bring down your marks. If you're doing the IELTS, if you're bring... Doing the TOEFL, any errors of this kind will bring your marks down. Okay? So even though they seem very basic, I know from experience that students make all of these mistakes. Be very careful not to make them. Let's look at what principles apply to correct English sentences. Okay? So, an English sentence must express a complete thought and it must express it with certain elements. Now, just because a sentence must express a complete thought, it doesn't have to have a lot of words; it doesn't have to be a very long sentence.
Top 100 English Grammar Rules | 2018 मे होने वाली परीक्षाओ के लिए सबसे महत्वपूर्ण | SSC CHSL | CGL
 
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Click Here For PDF : http://www.mahendraguru.com/2018/01/top-100-english-grammar-rules-for-ssc.html Daily Live Class Schedule: - 07:00 AM - CURRENT AFFAIRS LIVE 08:00 AM - THE EDITORIAL TIMES 09:00 AM - ENGLISH SBI CLERK PRELIMS CLASS LIVE 10:00 AM - MATHS SBI CLERK PRELIMS CLASS LIVE 11:00 AM - REASONING SBI CLERK PRELIMS CLASS LIVE 12:00 PM - GS SSC CHSL CLASS LIVE 03:00 PM - ENGLISH SSC CHSL CLASS LIVE 04:00 PM - MATHS SSC CHSL CLASS LIVE 05:00 PM - REASONING SSC CHSL CLASS LIVE Get the Strategies from our Experts to Crack English in SSC CHSL | CGL | MTS | Other Competitive Exams 2018. It is always good to have an expert advise to make your plan more constructive as well as successful in order to achieve anything having worth. This videos exclusively designed in such a way that you can cover up major sections easily and score max marks. Are You Preparing For Government Job | Banking | SSC | Railway | Other Competitive Examination then Join Mahendras To Enhance your practice on Stportal : https://stportal.mahendras.org/ Buy our New Speed Test Cards From : MYSHOP- https://myshop.mahendras.org Visit Branch Location - https://mahendras.org/branches.aspx Subscribe to our Mahendra Guru Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiDKcjKocimAO1tVw1XIJ0Q?sub_confirmation=1 YOU MAY ALSO WATCH THESE VIDEOS:: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiDKcjKocimAO1tVw1XIJ0Q/playlists ENGLISH PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPFo1UjvnFTFgkVG0Zw5QNCM MATHS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPEqciVVc70WFzIuYPvy-fkL REASONING PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPHWI9gFGyt_VQ2QFkw-tYU6 GA PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPHsYRImGgN2KD3hDuGZ9YZg GS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPGfOgRGCOerAXQ8z9Z-JzZA COMPUTER PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPFuAPo8JnMaeGyTDsBBaNBs IMPORTANT FOR BANK / SSC / RAILWAYS EXAM. JOIN US ON :- FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Emahendras/ TWITTER : https://twitter.com/Mahendras_mepl INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/mahendra.guru/ PINTEREST : https://in.pinterest.com/gurumahendra/ GOOGLE + : https://plus.google.com/+MahendraGuruvideos 1. No duplicacy or editing of the videos is allowed without the written permission of the publisher. 2. All the dispute are subject to Lucknow Jurisdiction only. @ Copyright Reserved
Articles Rule (part 4).Repetition Of The Articles. Best Use of A, An, The. By XPclasses
 
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Well Hello Guys.... & Welcome To XPclasses, यहां आपको मिलेंगीं Competitive Exam से Related सारी जानकारी SSC {CGL, CPO, CHSL, MTS} RRB {Group D, ALP, NTPC} And Other Competitive Exam..... साथ ही हम हल करेंगे Previous Year Paper (Full Analysis & Solution) So जुड़े रहे XPclasses के साथ और अपने लक्ष्य को प्राप्त करे This Is Mukund Mohit & You Are XP Watcher..... Don't Forget Subscribe & Hit The Bell Icon LIKE......... SHARE.... जय हिंद..... वन्देमातरम... XP Classes XPclasses
Views: 206 XPclasses
Use 5 | A AN THE | English Articles Grammar
 
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In today's English Articles Grammar | A AN THE | We talk about A and AN, use 5, when vowel letters aren't pronounced as vowels. 1 | Instagram http://bit.ly/2uWhPZh 2 | http://www.foryourenglish.com 3 | Facebook http://bit.ly/2ijw1Fw
Views: 190 For Your English
How to change a verb into a noun!
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ With the simple addition of '-ment' or '-ion' to a verb, it becomes a noun! Learn how to change a verb into a noun in this grammar lesson. It's pretty simple, once you understand how it works. Test your skills with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/change-verbs-into-nouns/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello, my name is Ronnie. I am going to teach you some English. It's going to be great. It's going to be easy, I think. Something that a lot of you have difficulty with in English is nouns, verbs, adjectives, and all those other crazy, crazy things we have in English. I'm going to teach you two tricks that will help you, when you are trying to figure out if a word is a verb or a noun, or when to use a verb. Is it a noun? Do what? So today's lesson is the birth of a noun. You are going to take a verb, it's going to do some magical things, and by the end of the lesson it is going to become a noun, so birth of a noun. How to change a verb to a noun, the first thing we are going to do is have a look at the verbs. We have the verb "employ, develop, move, judge, advertise, and establish." Do you think you see a spelling mistake here? Are you wondering why this is an "s" and not a "z-ed," well, let me tell you something. In the UK also known as England, they would spell it with a zed, whereas in North America we spell it with an "s." So there is a spelling difference. And so, you might see it spelled with a "zed" or an "s." Both of them are correct, if you have spellcheck when you are typing something, it might go wrong. But you might have American spellcheck, so just be careful. So, either "zed" or "s" is correct. "Employ" do you know what that verb means? Have you heard that word, "employ?" It means use or work. The next one we have is "develop;" if you "develop" something it basically means you help to grow. The next one is move. I am moving my right hand, but not my left hand. That would cause much problem. The next one is judge. There's a noun of "judge" and a verb of "judge." To "judge" something means to give your opinion. The next one is "advertise." The "s" and the "zed" the pronunciation is the same. Don't worry. "Advertise" means to tell something, usually you do it for money. You "advertise" something on a website, or you advertise on TV to get a product, to make you money. The next one is "establish, establish means to make something. What we're going to do, two tricks. The first trick is we're going to take these verbs, and we are going to add four letters to make it a noun. The letters are "m-e-n-t." So we have the verb "employ." The noun changes to "employment." Did you just say mint and not m-e-n-t? I did, English pronunciation is difficult. In English we don't say employment, we actually say it like this word, "m-i-n-t." Like a breath mint. So all of these words you must spell with "m-e-n-t," but your pronunciation is going to be "m-i-n-t," like "mint, employment." The next one we have is a "development." "Employment" means job. "Development," we use it to mean an area that has been "developed." You could use it to say it's a building; this is a "development" of this country, or a building of a company. "Move," we have the noun of movement. "Move, move," not "move, move," do you know why I got distracted? Because, I was thinking of a Bob Marley song that's called "A Movement of the People, "movement" of the people. If anyone is a Bob Marley fan out there. "Movement" of people is a good way to remember what this word means. "Movement" basically means a group of people who try and change something in society, so a "movement" is a group of people. The next one is "judge, judgment." It means the same, the noun, and the verb. You give your opinion of something. "Advertisement," an "advertisement" you will see on the subway. You will see everywhere you go, everywhere you look. In the world, people are trying to sell you something in an "advertisement." We usually shorten the word, and just call it an "ad." Next one is "establish," changes to "establishment." For some reason I don't like the word "establishment." "Establishment" means something that has been "established." We usually use it in the form of government or politics; it can also mean a place like a restaurant. I like restaurants. The next trick, trick number one is you take the verb you change it to a noun using "m-e-n-t" or "m-i-n-t" "employment." The next one is this word, "act."
How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson
 
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✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI 👉 Check the latest Video - American Idioms I love to use the most? How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson I will share easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. • Avoid using contractions – Do not use contractions while constructing your sentences, esp. if you are writing a business email or formal letters i.e. words like don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, isn’t, haven’t should be avoided. • Avoid there are/ there is – It will make your sentence more lengthy and boring to read. e.g There are many problems in her class (incorrect) Her class is facing many problems. (Correct) There is an exhibition at the hotel. (Incorrect) The hotel is holding an exhibition. (Correct) • Avoid using unnecessary words in your sentences like very; really, a lot instead use better vocabulary. It will definitely not change the meaning of your sentence but will make it sound interesting. Students think literature is very hard. Students think literature is difficult. • Make use of strong verbs – It will make your sentence sound more appropriate and concrete. He gave assistance to my friend. (weak verb) My friend assisted him. (Strong verb)
ARTICLES ( ENGLISH GRAMMAR RULE-1) हिंदी
 
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1st lesson of ADVANCE ENGLISH ACADEMY is an Article, I am going teach you, what is an article? the basic rule of English grammar is an article. let's watch... https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQzizae_H7SJFaDOW4QkYsw
The Present Perfect Tense | English Grammar Lesson
 
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This lesson is an overview of the present perfect tense What it looks like, how to use it and when to use it! Structure: Subject + have/has + main verb (past participle form) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ If you don’t feel confident using the present perfect tense in English yet… There are probably a few reasons why! You need to know the past participle form of English verbs... And that can be pretty tricky with irregular verbs! 😳 And you need to understand how to use this tense! Perhaps you feel unsure about when to use the present perfect and when to use the past simple tenses. I will explain all of this inside this lesson. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ When using the present perfect tense, you need an auxiliary verb that helps your main verb to function. In the perfect tenses, the verb (to) have is always the auxiliary verb. In the present perfect tense, the main verb is in the past participle form. This is not difficult for regular past tense verbs. For regular verbs, the past participle form of the verb is the same as the past tense verb, so you just add -ed! But irregular verbs are different and the only way to learn the past participle form is to learn them individually. Past simple or present perfect tense? To answer this question you need to think about time. Finished time and unfinished time. Think about ‘last week’. That’s a good example of finished time. Last week is finished, it’s over. Yesterday, last week, last month, last year, 1991 - these are all examples of finished time… Time that is complete. What about ‘this week’? Is this week finished? No! Not yet. That is an example of unfinished time. There’s still more of this week to come. It’s not finished yet. When you are talking about a time period that has finished, use the past simple. When you are talking about a time period that is unfinished… Like today, this week, this month, this year, use the present perfect. Watch this lesson to learn when to use the present perfect and when to use the past simple tense. Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/09/13/the-present-perfect-tense/ *I recommend* ⭐️Speak with native teachers... 30mins every day! Get a free 14-day trial here: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRiVfHqBIIvSgKmgnSY66g?sub_confirmation=1 Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 706497 mmmEnglish
English Grammar - Gerund or Infinitive? ('I like swimming' or 'I like to swim'?)
 
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http://www.engvid.com I love to learn! I love learning! Which sentence is correct? Watch this English grammar lesson on gerunds and infinitives to find out. You'll learn when and how to use gerunds and infinitives properly -- especially useful for talking about your hobbies or interests. Then take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/gerund-or-infinitive/ .
Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes - Present, Past, Future | Simple, Continuous, Perfect
 
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Learn all of the 12 tenses in English easily in this lesson. This lesson features simple explanations, lots of example sentences and illustrations. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 5. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 1742650 Learn English Lab
Genders of German Nouns: Tips, Tricks, & Memory Tools - 3 Minuten Deutsch Lesson #5 - Deutsch lernen
 
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In this video I tackle the idea of German noun genders. I give you some advice and tips about how to remember them and help you on your quest to learn German. Enjoy. Links you might find helpful are below Smarter German Video #1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vHSJp0QlxQ Smarter German Video #2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrUNyXfnf9Q Hints for Der http://german.about.com/library/blgen_der.htm about.com Hints for Die http://german.about.com/library/blgen_die.htm about.com Hints for Das http://german.about.com/library/blgen_das.htm Subscribe to learn German with new videos each week: http://bit.ly/subgwa Support "Learn German with Herr Antrim" on Patreon: http://bit.ly/gwapatreon Become a Member of the Learn German with Herr Antrim community & get exclusive perks: http://bit.ly/gwamember Get materials for individual videos on Teachers Pay Teachers: http://bit.ly/gwatpt Get German books, resources, and more here: http://bit.ly/gwastore Learn more German via Herr Antrim's blog: http://bit.ly/gwablogs The videos in the "Beginner German with Herr Antrim" series are designed for people just starting out in their quest to learn the German language. These videos are designed to be a sequential introduction to the topics beginners need to know in order to master the A1 level of German. If you are just starting to learn the German language, but don't know where to start, this playlist is for you. http://bit.ly/beginnergerman The videos in the "Intermediate German with Herr Antrim" series are designed for people at the intermediate level in their quest to learn the German language. These videos are designed to be a sequential introduction to the topics intermediate learners need to know in order to master the B1 level of German. If you are at the intermediate level and trying to learn the German language, but don't know where to start, this playlist is for you. http://bit.ly/intermediategerman Twitter: http://bit.ly/gwatwitter Facebook: http://bit.ly/gwafacebook Instagram: http://bit.ly/gwainstagram Channel Description: Learn German for beginner and intermediate levels of vocabulary, grammar, and tips from YouTube's best German teacher, Herr Antrim. Your one-stop shop for all of your German language learning needs. This channel was voted one of the top 25 best YouTube channels for learning languages according to bab.la (2016). If you have any questions about German grammar, I am always happy to help. Just send me a private message, a comment on a video or an email at [email protected] #learngerman #deutschlernen #germanwithantrim
USE 4 | A AN THE | English Articles Grammar
 
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In today's English Articles Grammar | A AN THE | We talk about A and AN, use 84, before adjectives and adverbs. 1 | Instagram http://bit.ly/2uWhPZh 2 | http://www.foryourenglish.com 3 | Facebook http://bit.ly/2ijw1Fw
Views: 221 For Your English
Using   I, me, my, mine, and myself correctly – English Grammar Lesson
 
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Using I, me, my, mine, and myself correctly – English Grammar Lesson. Take the quiz - http://www.learnex.in/using-i-me-my-mine-and-myself-correctly If you’re confused by the words I, me, my, mine, and myself, you’re not alone! In this lesson, you will learn the difference between them and when to use the right one. I and ME I is the subject – the person who does the action in the sentence. Only use “I” when you are referring to yourself in the subject of the sentence. In other words, you are the one taking action. I gave John the book. Me is the object – the person who receives the action in the sentence. The pronoun “me” should be used when someone else will perform the action to, or for, you. John gave me the book. OR: John gave the book to me. When there are more than one subject or object people do get a little confused , so we will see how to use it correctly John and I saw Jane at the party. John = subject I = subject Jane= object The teacher called Jim and me. The teacher = subject Jim = object me = object MY and MINE Use my before the word, and use mine after the word. Remember my is always followed by noun where as mine replaces the noun. John is my friend. John is a friend of mine. Those are my glasses. Those glasses are mine. MYSELF The pronoun “myself” should only be used when you are performing the action on yourself. No one else can do anything to yourself. The word myself is used in two cases: When you do something to yourself Eg) I accidentally cut myself with the knife. For emphasis - when you want to emphasize the “I” Eg) I baked this cake myself! BY MYSELF The expression by myself means alone: I went out to dinner by myself.
THE BEST RULE OF ARTICLES:MUST WATCH FROM YOU CAN SPEAK KIT
 
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English  Lesson Definite Article "the"
 
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This lesson discusses how and when to use "the". There are always exceptions, but this lesson gives the main points quickly. Revised 9/4/2014 www.eslhelpers.org
Views: 1701 Kath Katsenis
Articles Rule (Part 1). Best Use Of A, An, The. For SSC, Bank & All Competitive Exam.
 
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Well Hello Guys.... & Welcome To XPclasses, यहां आपको मिलेंगीं Competitive Exam से Related सारी जानकारी SSC {CGL, CPO, CHSL, MTS} RRB {Group D, ALP, NTPC} And Other Competitive Exam..... साथ ही हम हल करेंगे Previous Year Paper (Full Analysis & Solution) So जुड़े रहे XPclasses के साथ और अपने लक्ष्य को प्राप्त करे You Are XP Watcher..... Don't Forget Subscribe & Hit The Bell Icon LIKE......... SHARE.... जय हिंद..... वन्देमातरम..
Views: 321 XPclasses
A quick lesson on the definite and indefinite articles - how to use "a" and "the"
 
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In this video EnglishSpeakingCourse.Net provides a brief yet useful explanation of when to use the words: "a" and "the"
Views: 3222 SpeakingCourse