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Non Timber Forest Resources
 
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Non Timber Forest Resources accompanies module 8 in Forest Worker Training.
Views: 68 Forestry Works
Non-timber Forest Products a Hidden Economy
 
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Forests inspire the culture of Indonesian people. Over centuries, people evolved their cultural forest ethnicity, into a wealthy living harmony. This video will gives some description about the unique non-timber forest products produced by forest people that can create high economic value in the urban lifestyle while at the same time, forest will also connect us to the age old Indonesian ancient traditional heritage.
Non wood forest products (oil, tannin, dye, gum, resin) - Status and value addition
 
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Subject: Agriculture (2nd Year) Courses: Forest Resource Management
Forestry Economics: Optimal Rotation Age (Part 1)
 
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This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. The Forestry Economics series will look at what influences the decision of when to cut down a forest and the non-market values that should be considered to create an economically efficient system. This video looks at the factors involved in deciding when to harvest a given stand of trees and what the crop rotation period should be. Topics covered include stumpage value, growth rate, maximum sustainable revenue, average and incremental growth, and opportunity cost. To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out: http://www.conservation-strategy.org/
Forest Ecology and NTFP
 
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Subject:Sociology Paper: Ecology and society
Views: 91 Vidya-mitra
Non-timber forest product | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Non-timber forest product 00:00:55 1 Definitions 00:02:41 2 Uses 00:03:40 3 Economic importance 00:05:09 4 In India 00:05:47 5 In ethnic minority people's livelihoods 00:08:11 6 Research 00:08:54 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Non-timber forest products (NTFPs), also known as non-wood forest products (NWFPs), minor forest produce, special, minor, alternative and secondary forest products, are useful substances, materials and/or commodities obtained from forests which do not require harvesting (logging) trees. They include game animals, fur-bearers, nuts, seeds, berries, mushrooms, oils, foliage, pollarding, medicinal plants, peat, mast, fuelwood, fish, spices, and forage.Research on NTFPs has focused on their ability to be produced as commodities for rural incomes and markets, as an expression of traditional knowledge or as a livelihood option for rural household needs, and as a key component of sustainable forest management and conservation strategies. All research promotes forest products as valuable commodities and tools that can promote the conservation of forests.
Views: 124 Subhajit Sahu
Identifying the Possibilities for Non-Timber Forest Products p2
 
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Video of the presentation "Identifying the Possibilities for Non-Timber Forest Products" delivered by Lloyd Mapplebeck (Associate Professor, Nova Scotia Agricultural College) at the conference "From Atlantic Fields and Forests" held in Truro, NS -- February 18 & 19, 2010.
Views: 396 PEIMFNP
Non Timber Forest Products
 
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This video was made for our WoodFacts Project addressing the question, "What is meant by the term Non-Timber Forest Products." Submitted by Ryan Murley and Andy Gambirozic.
Views: 203 Ryan Murley
Identifying the Possibilities for Non-Timber Forest Products p1
 
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Video of the presentation "Identifying the Possibilities for Non-Timber Forest Products" delivered by Lloyd Mapplebeck (Associate Professor, Nova Scotia Agricultural College) at the conference "From Atlantic Fields and Forests" held in Truro, NS -- February 18 & 19, 2010.
Views: 1452 PEIMFNP
Challenges & Successes of Non-Timber Forest Product Business p4
 
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Video of the presentation "Challenges and Successes of a Non-Timber Forest Products Business" delivered by Jonathan Forbes (Forbes Wild Food) at the conference "From Atlantic Fields and Forests" held in Truro, NS -- February 18 & 19, 2010.
Views: 85 PEIMFNP
Non-Wood Forest Products.
 
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Views: 101 Murat Boz
Non-Timber Values
 
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Views: 7 nbfpa
Green Economies
 
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The bounty of forests has been the lifeline of civilizations from the beginning of time itself. This bounty however can get sparse given the greed with which forests are plundered. The primary flaw behind this is the failure to understand the intricate balance that the immediate life forests hold and using them as an easily replaceable resource. Green Economies is therefore a breakthrough in thought and work flow that beautifully structures sustainable usage and makes it monetarily viable. This idea thus saves the forests and the gives the immediate indigenous tribe depending on it,and all of us, a better tomorrow. The following are the CEPF-Atree funded projects that have made Green Economies a reality to be proud of. 1. Junglescapes has made removingLantana, an alien invasive plant a sustainable, and monetizing forest friendly activity in Southern Karnataka. 2. Applied Environmental Research Foundation has developed green economy that makes the use of non-timber forest products a sustainable activity against the mere chopping of trees in Northern Western Ghats.
Views: 697 ATREE CEPF
Local Livelihood Enhancement through Sustainable Management and Marketing of NTFPs in Karnali
 
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This video documentary was produced by ANSAB (Asia Network for Sustainable Agriculture and Bioresources) in collaboration with Mission East and Karnali Integrated Rural Development and Research Center (KIRDARC); and local partners Rural Development Group Programme (RDGP) and Rural Community Development Center (RCDC) under “Economic Growth for Social Justice: Supporting NTFP trade and business development in Karnali” project supported from European Commission. The video is focused on local livelihood enhancement through sustainable management of non timber forest products of Humla, Jumla and Mugu districts of Karnali region. For more information, click http://goo.gl/gZb261 Nepali Version of this video is available at https://youtu.be/Uc6zfN3jCSQ
Views: 1927 Ansab456
Non-Timber Product Markets for the Poor - Part 1
 
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Forests in India are important not just for their timbre but also for a range of other economic and non-economic reasons. Non-timbre forest products known as NTFPs, obtained from about 3,000 plant species in India, are an important source of food and income for tribals and poor people living in and around the forests. Although over 70 billion dollars worth of NTFPs are traded annually in India, hardly any of these profits are passed on to the tribals who are the primary managers, protectors and gatherers of these resources. This film showcases how NGO helped these forest dependent communities in getting better rates for their products by creating awareness and by creating a common platform for discussions between the Forest Department, Girijan Cooperative Corporation, NGOs, VSSs and the forest dependent communities.
Views: 1328 cpfvideo
Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFP) 'Heart of Borneo (HOB)'
 
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Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFP) 'Heart of Borneo (HOB)' was held on 26 October 2017.Copyright @ Sarawak Chief Minister Office , CMO
Views: 139 SarawakKu
Ramadhani Achdiawan - Rattan: The decline of a once-important non-timber forest product in Indonesia
 
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We investigated the production and trade in rattan along the supply chain in Indonesia, more specifically, West Kutai in East Kalimantan. Our analysis of local livelihoods in 2004 and 2011 indicates that communities have abandoned rattan as their main source of income, primarily because of low rattan farm-gate prices. We found that rattan prices are kept artificially low through price fixing within a cartel of rattan traders. Farm-gate prices are also kept low by export quotas. The result has been a substantial reduction in export volumes of Indonesian rattan products (as opposed to unprocessed and semi-processed rattan). Other contributing factors include reduced overseas demand, the relative strength of the rupiah and the loss of Indonesias competitive edge over other countries. Compared to its competitors, Indonesia has higher transaction costs, including taxes, tariffs, administrative costs and transportation costs. We conclude that a lack of reliable data on rattan resources and unstable policy have hampered efforts to develop sustainable management strategies and annual allowable harvest volumes. We recommend the development of a national rattan action plan, based on reliable scientific data. This would require more accurate information on rattan trade, future development in the rattan products market, production capacity in forests and planted rattan gardens, and international trade, including illegal trade. Such information could guide rattan policies, specifically determining what trade legislation would have the best macro and microeconomic results for Indonesia. The article is available here: http://www.cifor.org/library/4484/rattan-the-decline-of-a-once-important-non-timber-forest-product-in-indonesia/ To watch previous [email protected] presentations, please go to CIFOR TV : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZ1FEAFDHOWcnCwld2Qjio_vqHIExpcwG
Managing Forest Stands
 
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Views: 7 App Dev
Forests for People 2: The Economics of Community Forestry
 
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This video looks at the options and challenges regarding how community forests can be used, including for sustaining livelihoods, producing and selling timber or non-timber forest products, and obtaining payments for the services which forests provide. Produced for Forests Monitor and Tropenbos International by Earthsight. Financed by DFID and Tropenbos International
What is COMMUNITY FORESTRY? What does COMMUNITY FORESTRY mean? COMMUNITY FORESTRY meaning
 
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What is COMMUNITY FORESTRY? What does COMMUNITY FORESTRY mean? COMMUNITY FORESTRY meaning - COMMUNITY FORESTRY definition - COMMUNITY FORESTRY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Community forestry is an evolving branch of forestry whereby the local community plays a significant role in forest management and land use decision making by themselves in the facilitating support of government as well as change agents. It involves the participation and collaboration of various stakeholders including community, government and non-government organisations (NGO's). The level of involvement of each of these groups is dependent on the specific community forest project, the management system in use and the region. It gained prominence in the mid-1970s and examples of community forestry can now be seen in many countries including Nepal, Indonesia, Korea, Brazil, India and North America. Community forestry is a branch of forestry that deals with the communal management of forests for generating income from timber and non-timber forest products as forms of goods while in other hand regulating ecosystem, downstream settlements benefits from watershed conservation, carbon sequestration and aesthetic values as in forms of services . It has been considered one of the most promising options of combining forest conservation with rural development and community empowerment and poverty reduction objectives. Community forestry is defined by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations as "any situation that intimately involves local people in forestry activity". Community forestry exists when the local community in an area plays a significant role in land use decision-making and when the community is satisfied with its involvement and benefits from the management of the surrounding forest and its resources. Community forestry is first implemented through the establishment of a legal and institutional framework including the revision of legal norms and regulations for forest management, the development of National Forest Plans and the strengthening of decentralization processes to sub-national levels of government. The second principal line of action is the implementation of pilot projects to demonstrate the feasibility of the community forestry framework. However, a study by the Overseas Development Institute shows that the technical, managerial and financial requirements stipulated by the framework are often incompatible with local realities and interests. A successful legal and institutional framework will incorporate the strengthening of existing institutions and enable the dissemination of locally appropriate practices as well as the local capacity for regulation and control. In a 2016 review of community-based forestry, FAO estimated that almost one-third of the world's forest area is under some form of community-based management. Community forestry first came to prominence in the mid-1970s and has continued to evolve over the last few decades in a growing number of countries. The availability of forest resources are often greatly reduced for use by the local people due to increasing pressures to cultivate the land, reliance on the forest resources are also affected by economic and political changes. The evolution of community forestry in Nepal dates back to the late 1970s and was first instilled as an attempt to improve the management of forest resources and address environmental issues that were of great concern with the countries failing centralized forest policy. Over the past two decades, community forestry has been applied successfully in many developing countries, with its main goal being the alleviation of poverty amongst local forest communities and forest conservation. More recently, community forestry has been implemented in developing countries and it has been successful in its aims of sustainable forest management, climate change adaptation plan of action, and securing socio-economic benefits for local communities.
Views: 1693 The Audiopedia
Workshop on non-timber forest products
 
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Exploitation of forests and depletion of resources is a cause of concern and different methods are employed to cultivate medicinal plants in an organized way.
Views: 75 IIJNM Bangalore
Canada: Forest Products
 
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An overview of Canadian Forest Products for FRST20014. References: Natural Resources Canada (2016), Overview of Canada’s forest industry, viewed 22 October 2018, https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/forests/industry/overview/13311 Natural Resources Canada (2016), Non-timber forest products, viewed 22 October 2018, https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/forests/industry/products-applications/13203 Natural Resources Canada (2018), How does the forest industry contribute to the economy?, viewed 22 October 2018, https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/forests/report/economy/16517 Simona Sorrenti (2017), Non-wood forest products in international statistical systems, FAO, Rome. Music: https://www.bensound.com Photo: https://pixabay.com
Views: 40 Monique Cooke
What is a Forest Product? | Lang Hornthal | TEDxAsheville
 
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The answer to this question might surprise you. Our region continues to rely on healthy forests for economic prosperity and quality of life for its inhabitants. How forests are managed will not only dictate their resiliency,​ but also how graceful we transition to a new forest economy. For twenty-five years, Lang worked in the forest product sector and witnessed firsthand the many lives that are inextricably tied to our forests. In the last ten years, he has been promoting sustainable forestry management and supporting local forests through his non-profit Root Cause. Lang recently completed a Master of Science in Sustainability Studies to better understand the connection between man and our natural resources. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 582 TEDx Talks
Non-Timber Product Markets for the Poor - Part 2
 
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Forests in India are important not just for their timbre but also for a range of other economic and non-economic reasons. Non-timbre forest products known as NTFPs, obtained from about 3,000 plant species in India, are an important source of food and income for tribals and poor people living in and around the forests. Although over 70 billion dollars worth of NTFPs are traded annually in India, hardly any of these profits are passed on to the tribals who are the primary managers, protectors and gatherers of these resources. This film showcases how NGO helped these forest dependent communities in getting better rates for their products by creating awareness and by creating a common platform for discussions between the Forest Department, Girijan Cooperative Corporation, NGOs, VSSs and the forest dependent communities.
Views: 370 cpfvideo
ASEAN Stories of Social Forestry in the region
 
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The ASEAN Social Forestry Network (ASFN) is a government driven social forestry network in Southeast Asia, with main goal to strengthen ASEAN Cooperation in Social Forestry through the sharing of information and knowledge. Drawing out multi-stakeholder experiences in the region, ASFN continues to build up on linkages that promote further collaborative regional responses to national and local issues governing forests and peoples. Social forestry brings equitable economic benefits for indigenous peoples and forest-dependent communities, bringing intangible benefits like providing clean water, maintaining the climate and mitigating climate change. This film brings forward its valuable contribution to conservation, ecosystem services, local economy, food security, cultural identity, creative economy, making ASEAN a model for other regions.
Minor Forest Produce
 
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Dr. Shashi Tharoor raises a Starred Question on Minor Forest Produce in Lok Sabha during the Monsoon Session 2014
Amend the Forestry Act to Protect Shea Tree 14
 
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The Shea Network Ghana is calling on government to amend the Forestry Act for the inclusion of non-Timber forest resources like the shea tree. This move, the network believes will improve the effective management and protection of the shea tree and provide a guaranteed income for women who pick the plant. Infocus today takes a look at the sheanut business and its challenge in the Northern. Noah Nash report VO The shea nut is the seed of the shea fruit that grows on the tree. It usually grows to an average height of about 15 meters and generally grows wild as an indigenous tree species in 19 countries across the Africa continent. In Ghana, it grows in almost half of the country, covering an entire area of the northern regions, with Brong-Ahafo and northern Volta sparsely covered by the shea tree. The picking and gathering of the fruits last for a period of five months from April to August every year, and engages over 90,000 women pickers in the savannah ecological zone. These fruits are buried in pits to disintegrate and produce enough heat to prevent germination. The kernels are dried further to reduce the moisture content from 40% to 7% before processing. The kernel contains about 61% fat which when extracted is edible and can serve as an important source of raw material for the Soap and Candle industry, gum and rubber industry, cocoa butter industry as well as other industrial purposes. After the oil is extracted the residue serves as an excellent fuel and can also be mixed with mud for plastering of most traditional mud huts. The processed butter is rich in Vitamin A, E and F, which protect the skin from wrinkle, and ageing. But it is estimated that for all the available sheanut in the bush, only thirty percent of the nuts are picked, with the remainder going to waste due to snake and scorpion bits that most pickers encounter during picking. Most of these women say they don't have protective clothes like hand gloves and wellington boots. "We have a lot of challenges as nut pickers since we don't have protective clothes like wallet boots, hand glove and rain coat because you nee all this to support yourself against snake, ants and scorpion bits in the bush who leave around the tree. Without this protective cloths we are unable deeper into the bush to do more picking" "During picking in the bush the snakes are not good friends at all to us women. Snakes bite us every season so the need for hand gloves and wallet boots are very vital. We don't have the resources to acquire them so we are unable to collect more nut in the bush" Despite its economic importance and benefits in the savannah ecological zone it is worrying to see many shea trees being destroyed for mango plantation, farming, firewood and charcoal activities in the northern regions. A farmer in Nyon-Guman was destroying the shea tree by setting fire around it. “I planted groundnut but it is not going so well due to the shed from the shea tree. So that is why I have set fire around the two trees. I just want the groundnut to grow well.” The news team also spotted some women groups in Bagurugu community who were engaged in shea butter processing using the shea tree as firewood. They all gave reasons for the act. "The use of the shea tree as firewood is just unfortunate since the tree was cut down by a young man in the village who was subsequently reported to the chief who warn him of the act. He told us that the tree was infested with ants in his farm that force him to cut it off. But I’m aware of the importance of the shea tree to the work i do and i have other source of wood that i use for the fire so this is just unfortunate." However, the Forestry Act 571 mandates the Forestry Commission to only regulate the utilization of forest and timber resources, manage forest reserves and see to the development of a plantation and wildlife policy. It does not make provision for the management and protection of shea trees and other economic trees such as dawadawa and baobab, which are found in non-forest parklands. As a result, several shea trees are indiscriminately cut for charcoal while others are destroyed in bush fires. According to the Shea Network Ghana, the shea industry can only be salvaged if the Forestry Act is amended. Iddi Zakaria Batitoe is the National Coordinator of the network. It is estimated that more than 600,000 women in the Northern Regions, Brong Ahafo and Northern Volta are engaged in the processing of nut into Shea butter for local consumption and export. But their leader madam Dokurugu has noted that they are faced with several challenges. Noah Nash Hoenyefia for Viasat one news
Views: 636 Noah Nash H.
Forest Cultivated Mushrooms, a Rotten Business
 
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Specialty forest mushrooms include such delicacies as shiitake, oyster, lion's mane and wine cap which can be cultivated on wood substrates, as non-timber forest products for forest farming. Unfortunately, other choice wild edible mushrooms like chanterelles, morels, or boletus are not included because they cannot be deliberately cultivated. Shiitake is by far the most developed of the specialty forest mushrooms from the standpoint of both cultivation and marketing. There are four stages that the prospective grower must consider for forest cultivation of shiitake. Acquisition of substrate logs is the first one. What kinds of trees and when to cut them are the main considerations? Shortly after that comes inoculation of logs with the appropriate shiitake strain. The next stage requires some patience. The logs must be managed in a shady laying yard for up to a year to allow the fungus time to adequately colonize the log before it is ready to convert wood into mushrooms. After this so called "spawn run", the focus shifts to fruiting, harvesting and marketing of the mushrooms. Well managed logs can be productive for 3 or more years.
Views: 5046 Forest Farming
Forestry for Non-Foresters
 
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Meeting: 2016 Alabama Forest Owners' Association Annual Meeting. Video 1 Topic: Forestry for Non-Foresters Speakers: Dr. Bill Hubbard, Cooperative Extension Service - Southern Region Dr. Kris Irwin, D. B. Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Resources, UGA Powerpoint Slides (if used in presentation) & Biography at the link below. The annual meeting has been divided into several videos. One video for each presentation. Make the video larger by pressing the four arrows at the bottom right of the video. You can find all of the available presentations that were filmed at the 2016 AFOA Annual Meeting at this link: http://www.afoa.org/meetings/AM2016/agenda.htm Video filmed & produced by: Alabama Forest Owners' Association (AFOA)
Examining Forest Carbon Energy
 
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The latest programs in the Denman Forestry Issues series explore the theme "Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Independence." Washington state is heavily forested, particularly western Washington. Our forests provide ecosystem services like forest products such as lumber, as well as clean water for drinking and salmon, wildlife habitat, aesthetics and recreational opportunities. We are now considering other ecosystem services that forests could provide, like energy in the form of biofuels and carbon sequestration. This program is devoted to "Successful Examples and Concerns Relative to Forest Carbon and Energy in the Pacific Northwest." Presentations feature Craig Partridge on "Pursuing Carbon and Forest Sustainability in Forest Biomass Energy Production", Patrick Mazza on "The Northwest Biocarbon Initiative: The Role of Forests in Climate Stabilization," Steve Rigdon on "Northwest Tribes Biomass Energy Development: Issues and challenges," Mike Jostrom on "Plum Creek: Vested in Carbon,", and Edie Sonne-Hall on "Reducing Carbon Emissions in the Real World." Tom Hinckley|,Tom Hinckley, Professor and Interim Director UW School of Forest Resources Ellen Matheny|,Ellen Matheny, Director, Education and Outreach UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences Craig Partridge|,Craig Partridge, Director of Policy and Government Relations WA Department of Natural Resources Patrick Mazza|,Patrick Mazza, Research Director Climate Solutions Steve Rigdon|,Steve Rigdon, Generation Manager Yakama Power Mike Jostrom|, Director of Renewable Resources Plum Creek Timber Company Edie Sonne Hall|,Edie Sonne Hall, Manager, Sustainable Forests and Products Weyerhaeuser Company
Views: 91 UW Video
Spruce Budworm Outbreaks
 
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Outbreaks of eastern spruce budworm occur regularly in the boreal, Great Lakes and Acadian forest regions of Canada. As natural disturbances, they are an integral part of these forest ecosystems. Nevertheless, the spruce budworm is one of the most damaging native insects affecting spruces and true fir in Canada. During a major outbreak, tens of millions of hectares of trees can be severely defoliated by the insect. An outbreak may last several years, and cumulative defoliation can cause significant levels of mortality and growth loss in mature softwood forests. This in turn can result in significant losses of important timber and non-timber resources, negatively affecting the forest industry and forestry-dependent communities. For an accessible version: http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/science/video/18354
Views: 1961 NaturalResourcesCa
Forestry and the forest industry in a green economy - Short version
 
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An effort is under way worldwide to better manage our planet's forest resources and better enhance their role in mitigating climate change. Forest loss and degradation in developing countries account for nearly 20% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Monitoring and reducing these emissions has been the key goal for the international community in climate change negotiations and is important for the upcoming Rio+20 conference on sustainable development. Viet Nam is one example of a country that's taking important steps to manage and expand its forest resources. Previous loss of forested areas has been reversed and the country is now increasing forest area by about 1% every year.
Views: 412 FAOVideo
Forest Management
 
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"In the spring of 2011, the Denman Forestry Issues Series was presented by the School of Forest Resources (SFR), College of the Environment, at the University of Washington. The series featured nine speakers celebrating the international contributions of SFR to the United Nations International Year of Forests 2011, which has the theme of raising awareness of sustainable management, conservation, and development of all types of forests throughout the world. The third session focused on "Forest Management, Carbon Fluxes and Urban Wildlife." Rob Harrison described a forestry project in Brazil where intensive management and restoration ecology work side by side in the Mata Atlantica forest on the Brazilian east coast. Ken Bible showed how SFR is involved in a multinational carbon monitoring network at the Wind River Field Station in southern Washington near the Columbia River. Switching gears the final presentation was given by Barbara Clucas on a cross-continental comparison of ecological connections between humans and birds in urban areas in Europe (Berlin) and North America (Seattle)". The Denman Forestry Issues series is intended to educate the public about topical issues in forest resources in the Pacific Northwest, as well as provide information to natural resource specialists and students. Many of the international research, teaching and outreach activities conducted by SFR faculty and students impact the Pacific Northwest and some of the work is directly transferable. SFR has faculty and students working in Europe, Africa, South America and Asia in all types of forests and their interesting stories are told here." Rob Harrison|,Rob Harrison, Professor, School of Forest Resources Ken Bible|,Ken Bible, Research Scientist, Wind River Filed Station, School of Forest Resources Barbara Clucas,Barbara Clucas, Post-Doctoral Researcher, School of Forest Resources
Views: 8253 UW Video
Cities Skylines Forestry industry, Gameplay Tips #1
 
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Short tip about how to set up a forestry industry in Cities Skylines and how to maintain industrial districts for forest industry.
Views: 31639 perafilozof
Shea Network Ghana Call for amendment of Forestry ACT 571 14
 
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The Shea Network Ghana is calling on government to amend the Forestry Act for the inclusion of non-Timber forest resources like the shea tree. This move, the network believes will improve the effective management and protection of the shea tree and provide a guaranteed the income for women who pick the plant. The shea tree is one of the most important trees in economic terms as it engages more than 9,000 women in the Savannah Ecological Zone, as pickers. However the Forestry Act 571 mandates the Forestry Commission to only regulate the utilization of forest and timber resources, manage forest reserves and see to the development of a plantation and wildlife policy. It does not make provision for the management and protection of shea trees and other economic trees such as dawadawa and baobab, which are found in non-forest parklands. As a result, several shea trees are indiscriminately cut for fuel wood, charcoal while others are destroyed in bush fires, reducing the gestation period for most economic trees. According to the Shea Network Ghana, the shea industry can only be salvaged if the Forestry Act is amended. Iddi Zakaria Batitoe is the National Coordinator of the network. He noted further that the Network would be embarking on community sensitization in 30 districts in the Northern Region on the need to protect the shea trees. Some members of the public emphasized the relevance of the shea tree and called for legislation that will protect economic trees in the north. SOT 3: Mawuranye Daben SOT 4: Kadel Evans The Chairman of the Shea Network Ghana Prince Obeng urged government to resource the Forestry Commission to carry out sensitization as well as enforce the law in the fight against the destruction of economic trees. Noah Nash for Viasat one news
Views: 119 Noah Nash H.
Jiteshori community forest
 
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Documentary about community forest in Nepal. Jiteshori community forest documentary Butwal 13 Promotion NTV plus Forests at different latitudes and elevations form distinctly different ecozones: boreal forests near the poles, tropical forests near the equator and temperate forests at mid-latitudes. Higher elevation areas tend to support forests similar to those at higher latitudes, and amount of precipitation also affects forest composition. Human society and forests influence each other in both positive and negative ways.[8] Forests provide ecosystem services to humans and serve as tourist attractions. Forests can also affect people's health. Human activities, including harvesting forest resources, can negatively affect forest ecosystems.
Views: 63 Jay Cinema TV
Wild Coffee - Saving Southwest Ethiopia's Mountain Rainforest WCC-PFM Project
 
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The film follows the fortunes of two people and their communities in southwest Ethiopia involved in the Wild Coffee Conservation by Participatory Forest Management Project. This seeks to protect the rainforest and its precious genetic resources from deforestation whilst making sure that local people can earn a living from some of the non-timber forest products such as coffee and honey to be found in the forest. From picking the wild coffee cherries to finally getting it to market for a record price, the film shows the challenges they face, the beauty of the forest and how participatory forest management works. For more information regarding the project visit: http://wetlandsandforests.hud.ac.uk/ Director: Indrias Getachew This video was sponsored by the European Union Delegation to Ethiopia, and the Embassies of the Netherlands and Norway in Ethiopia. The authors are solely responsible for the views expressed in this document and they do not necessarily reflect those of the funders.
Green economy initiatives in the Bia Biosphere Reserve, Ghana
 
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The Bia Biosphere Reserve in Ghana is one of three biosphere reserves (BRs) in Africa who benefited from the project Green Economy in Biosphere Reserves (GEBR): A means to biodiversity conservation, poverty reduction and sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the project was to diversify the economy of communities living in and around the Biosphere Reserves in order to reduce their overreliance on forest resources such as the non-timber forest products. The ultimate goal is to improve local communities’ socio-economic status while conserving biodiversity. The full video is available here: https://youtu.be/XDsRuL_BQWU
Views: 764 UNESCO
Sal leaves Plate making: A old woman's dependence on NTFP
 
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The video is all about the tribal of Choupahari Jungle in Illabazar Block Birbhum. This old lady is about 80 years and is heavilydependent on Non-Timber Forest Produce (NTFP) which she collects from the forest. The choupahari is predominantly the residence of around few thousands of Santal Tribal. They are very poor and leads a measurable life. Though I captured the video during one of my field study during my Post Graduation days but I do have got a strong feelings for them. The forest is decreasing and the jungle is getting cleared at a faster rate. We must conserve our Natural resources and stop these tribal from getting exploited. Please comment and the conversations are made in Bengali as they were comfortable in it. As the researcher was not able to speak Santali their local dialect. #Atmosphere #DevelopIndia
Views: 369 Soumesh Ghosh
Green Economy in the Bia Biosphere Reserve, Ghana
 
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Biosphere reserves can be model regions for a green economy as they are ‘open-air labs’ for innovative approaches to sustainable development. The sustainable use of natural resources, by and for the benefit of humankind, is integral to this concept. The project “Green Economy in Biosphere Reserves: A means to poverty reduction, biodiversity conservation and sustainable development in sub- Saharan Africa” strives to ensure long-term conservation of biodiversity in three biosphere reserves in Ghana, Nigeria and Tanzania, all internationally recognized for their values in genetic resources and representative ecosystems. In Ghana, it was implemented in the Bia Biosphere Reserve, with the aim to diversify the economy of communities living in and around the biosphere reserve in order to reduce their overreliance on forest resources such as non-timber forest products. The ultimate goal is to improve local communities’ socio-economic status while conserving biodiversity. Four specific alternative livelihood activities towards a green economy were supported: palm oil production, snail gathering, apiculture (bee keeping) and mushroom farming. More information: http://bit.ly/2iFHuxc Bia Biosphere Reserve: http://bit.ly/2jfAq9V
Views: 513 UNESCO
What is REFORESTATION? What does REFORESTATION mean? REFORESTATION meaning & explanation
 
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What is REFORESTATION? What does REFORESTATION mean? REFORESTATION meaning - REFORESTATION pronunciation - REFORESTATION definition - REFORESTATION explanation - How to pronounce REFORESTATION? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Reforestation is the natural or intentional restocking of existing forests and woodlands that have been depleted, usually through deforestation. Reforestation can be used to rectify or improve the quality of human life by soaking up pollution and dust from the air, rebuild natural habitats and ecosystems, mitigate global warming since forests facilitate biosequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and harvest for resources, particularly timber, but also non-timber forest products. The term reforestation is similar to afforestation, the process of restoring and recreating areas of woodlands or forests that may have existed long ago but were deforested or otherwise removed at some point in the past. Sometimes the term re-afforestation is used to distinguish between the original forest cover and the later re-growth of forest to an area. Forestation is the establishment of forest growth on areas that either had forest or lacked it. Special tools, e.g. tree planting bars, are used to make planting of trees easier and faster. A debated issue in managed reforestation is whether or not the succeeding forest will have the same biodiversity as the original forest. If the forest is replaced with only one species of tree and all other vegetation is prevented from growing back, a monoculture forest similar to agricultural crops would be the result. However, most reforestation involves the planting of different seedlots of seedlings taken from the area, often of multiple species. Another important factor is the natural regeneration of a wide variety of plant and animal species that can occur on a clear cut. In some areas the suppression of forest fires for hundreds of years has resulted in large single aged and single species forest stands. The logging of small clear cuts and/or prescribed burning, actually increases the biodiversity in these areas by creating a greater variety of tree stand ages and species. Reforestation need not be only used for recovery of accidentally destroyed forests. In some countries, such as Finland, many of the forests are managed by the wood products and pulp and paper industry. In such an arrangement, like other crops, trees are planted to replace those that have been cut. In such circumstances, the industry can cut the trees in a way to allow easier reforestation. The wood products industry systematically replaces many of the trees it cuts, employing large numbers of summer workers for tree planting work. For example, in 2010, Weyerhaeuser reported planting 50 million seedlings. However replanting an old-growth forest with a plantation is not replacing the old with the same characteristics in the new. In just 20 years, a teak plantation in Costa Rica can produce up to about 400 m3 of wood per hectare. As the natural teak forests of Asia become more scarce or difficult to obtain, the prices commanded by plantation-grown teak grows higher every year. Other species such as mahogany grow more slowly than teak in Tropical America but are also extremely valuable. Faster growers include pine, eucalyptus, and Gmelina. Reforestation, if several indigenous species are used, can provide other benefits in addition to financial returns, including restoration of the soil, rejuvenation of local flora and fauna, and the capturing and sequestering of 38 tons of carbon dioxide per hectare per year. The reestablishment of forests is not just simple tree planting. Forests are made up of a community of species and they build dead organic matter into soils over time. A major tree-planting program could enhance the local climate and reduce the demands of burning large amounts of fossil fuels for cooling in the summer.
Views: 2377 The Audiopedia
Teshome
 
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In order to design any structural component efficiently, it is necessary to know in advance the strength capability of the material to be used. Bamboo presents some problem in this respect since the quality cannot be controlled as they are naturally occurring materials. All the other materials that are used structurally are manmade and therefore some form of quality control can be exercised during their productions, this has led to some research and project works on the structural properties of Bamboo. This thesis focuses on one of the characteristics of bamboo through assessing Bamboo’s performance structurally in tensile and flexural parameters for the well dried bamboo palm and Bamboo reinforced RC-beam member. Bamboo is a renewable and versatile resource, characterized by high strength and low weight, and is easily worked using simple tools. It is widely recognized as one of the most important non-timber forest resources due to the high socio-economic benefits from bamboo based products. This thesis work presents how bamboo has to be utilized as an alternative to steel reinforcement through evaluating its tensile strength and flexural performances in being reinforcement in cement concrete beams through conducting laboratory tests accordingly.