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LEARNING STRATEGIES -REBECCA L. OXFORD- MELISSA O
 
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Views: 23 MELISSA OSPINO
Main Conference Plenary Presentation by Pro  Rebecca L  Oxford in the 12th Annual CamTESOL Conferenc
 
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Main Conference Plenary Presentation by Pro Rebecca L Oxford in the 12th Annual CamTESOL Conference. Please subscribe this channel to see more videos by: https://youtu.be/jjFOXRLZfRk https://youtu.be/OS7i6vQ8dak https://youtu.be/NdmshsTnOfc https://youtu.be/acv3rXnzhKI
Language Learning Strategies - Memory Strategies #1
 
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Have you ever heard of Language Learnin Strategies? They are "tools" that every student should know to become a better and autonomous learner. The terminology developed by Rebecca Oxford categorizes the LLS into Direct Strategies and Indirect Strategies. This video starts with the first strategy from a bigger section called 'Memory Strategies', derived from the Direct group.
Language learning strategies.
 
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Language learning strategies Rebecca L. Oxford-- Created using Powtoon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
AAMU_GF_Oxford
 
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Dr. Rebecca Oxford - Chair, Pyschology & Counseling
Views: 1129 AAMU GS
Language Learning Strategies | Strategies of Language Learning
 
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Language learning strategies is a term referring to the processes and actions that are consciously deployed by language learners to help them to learn or use a language more effectively. They have also been defined as ‘thoughts and actions, consciously chosen and operationalized by language learners, to assist them in carrying out a multiplicity of tasks from the very outset of learning to the most advanced levels of target language performance’. The term language learner strategies, which incorporates strategies used for language learning and language use, is sometimes used, although the line between the two is ill-defined as moments of second language use can also provide opportunities for learning. History: Language learning strategies were first introduced to the second language literature in 1975, with research on the good language learner. At the time it was thought that a better understanding of strategies deployed by successful learners could help inform teachers and students alike of how to teach and learn languages more effectively. Initial studies aimed to document the strategies of good language learners. In the 80s the emphasis moved to classification of language learning strategies. Strategies were first classified according to whether they were direct or indirect, and later they were strategies divided into cognitive, metacognitive or affective/social categories. In 1990, Rebecca Oxford published her landmark book "Language Learning Strategies: What Every Teacher Should Know" which included the "Strategy Inventory for Language Learning" or "SILL", a questionnaire which was used in a great deal of research in the 1990s and early 2000s. Controversy over basic issues such as definition grew stronger in the late 1990s and early 2000s, however, with some researchers giving up trying to define the concept in favour of listing essential characteristics. Others abandoned the strategy term in favour of "self regulation". Classification of language learning strategies: O'Malley and Chamot classification: In 1990, O'Malley and Chamot developed a classification of three types of language learning strategies:  Metacognitive strategies, which involved thinking about (or knowledge of) the learning process, planning for learning, monitoring learning while it is taking place, or self-evaluation of learning after the task had been completed.  Cognitive strategies, which involved mental manipulation or transformation of materials or tasks, intended to enhance comprehension, acquisition, or retention.  Social/affective strategies, which consisted of using social interactions to assist in the comprehension, learning or retention of information. As well as the mental control over personal affect that interfered with learning. This model was based on cognitive theory, which was commended, but it was also criticized for the ad hoc nature of its third category. Oxford taxonomy: Also in 1990, Rebecca Oxford developed a taxonomy for categorizing strategies under six headings:  Cognitive—making associations between new and already known information;  Mnemonic—making associations between new and already known information through use of formula, phrase, verse or the like;  Metacognitive—controlling own cognition through the co-ordination of the planning, organization and evaluation of the learning process;  Compensatory—using context to make up for missing information in reading and writing;  Affective—regulation of emotions, motivation and attitude toward learning;  Social—the interaction with other learners to improve language learning and cultural understanding. In later years this classification system was criticized for its problems in separating mnemonic stratgeies from cognitive strategies, when one is a sub-category of the other, and the inclusion of compensatory strategies, which are connected to how a learner uses the language, rather than learns it. ………………………………………………………………………………….. Sources: Text: Text of this video has been taken from Wikipedia, which is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License Background Music: Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans The Lounge: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/jazz Images: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com
Views: 1181 Free Audio Books
Oxford's Language Learning Strategies Categorization - Memory
 
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Oxford's Language Learning Strategies Categorization - Memory
Views: 124 Wern Lie Woon
Learning Strategies (Oxford, R. 2001)
 
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Oxford's Typology of Language Learning Strategies (LLS)
 
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How do I understand Oxford's Typology of Language Learning Strategies and How I memorise them.
Views: 58 Liz Dan
Episode 14: Dictogloss, Rebecca Oxford, and the Global Influence of English
 
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In this episode the TEFLologists discuss the "dictogloss" teaching technique, the life and work of Rebecca Oxford, and the results of a study into which languages have the most global influence. If you would like to contact us, please send an email to [email protected] or follow us on Twitter @TEFLology.   TEFL, ESL, EFL, ELT, TESOL, Applied Linguistics
Rebecca Oxford Estrategias para el aprendizaje
 
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Views: 307 Michelle Márquez
Estrategias Oxford
 
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Trabajo para la asignatura de Didáctica de Especialidad donde hablo sobre las estrategias de estudio que usaría para distintos materiales.
Lordes Ortega
 
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"Best Practices for Error Correction in Foreign Language Classrooms" - February 4, 2016
Views: 440 IWL Channel
Ways To Memorize Oxford (1990) Typology (LLS)
 
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3 ways to memorize Rebecca Oxford (1990) LLS typology. Enjoy!
Views: 58 Rebecca Lydia
IELTS Listening - Top 14 tips!
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Improve your IELTS score with these quick tips! In this lesson, you will learn about the Listening module of the IELTS exam. I will teach you the most common mistakes people make and how to avoid them. Watch this free video, so that you know how to practice for the IELTS Listening test. I want you to be prepared and confident on your test day, so that you can get the best results on your IELTS! http://www.engvid.com/ielts-listening-top-10-tips/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's lesson, I am going to teach you my top tips for the IELTS listening module. Okay? So, before I teach you these tips, you might be wondering: "What's the IELTS listening module?" Well, the IELTS is a test and one part of the test is listening. So, in the listening section, you're going to have 40 questions where you're going to listen to some conversations for about 30 minutes, and then you'll have 10 minutes to transfer your answers over to another sheet. So, in total, it's 40 minutes; 30 minutes for listening, 10 minutes for writing down your answers. Okay, now this part of the IELTS is very possible to get a high mark, especially if you follow my tips. All right? Now, before we get started, I just want to let you know: I know you can do the IELTS. I know you can pass, I know you can get a great mark, a great bandwidth - you just have to have confidence in yourself and you have to practice. Practice, practice, practice; it really pays off. So let's get started. So, my first tip: write no more than three words. What do I mean by this? I don't mean for the whole thing, write no more than three words. On the IELTS, you will have to read the instruction of what to do. Often times, the instruction, before you listen, you're going to see: "Write no more than three words." This is an example of an instruction you must follow. One mistake a lot of students make during the IELTS is they don't read instructions properly. They're nervous, they're stressed out, they write whatever, they don't... They don't follow the instructions. If you see something like: "Write no more than three words." Do that. You can't write four, don't write five. Write three or less. Okay? So my main point here: follow the instructions carefully. Point number two: get used to British English. A large part of the IELTS, you will be listening... For... For... Sorry, for the listening, you will be listening to British accents. Sometimes you might hear Australian accents or Canadian, you might hear a range, but a lot of the accents will be British. So it's very important to get used to listening to British accents. And also, listen to other accents like Canadian, Australian; that's a good idea too. Where can you find British accents to listen to? I recommend the BBC. They have a lot of great videos there and most of it's with British accents, so it's a very good idea so you can practice listening. The more you practice listening with British accents, the easier it will be to understand British speakers. Especially if you're used to American English, this is a very good thing to do. Related to this point: British vocab. You should learn British vocabulary. For example: in American English and Canadian English, we say: "truck". In British English, we say: "lorry". So it's good to know some of these British expressions, some British words. One idea where you can practice these is if you check out our website: www.engvid.com, we have a new teacher who is British and who will be talking about British English, so check out her... Her videos. It will also be good to help you with practicing listening to British accents. Number four: spelling counts. Okay? Very important. The listening part of the IELTS is not just listening; you're actually using other skills like writing and reading. Now, with writing, when you write down your answers, you sometimes have to spell something out, so you have to be very, very careful with spelling. Okay? This is something you should really study and practice before you take the listening part of the IELTS. Practice your spelling. Learn spelling rules. We have a lot of different videos on how to spell on engVid, so I would come and check those ones out. Number five - this is the thing that always gets my students and I always warn them about when we practice - plural versus singular. Okay? You have to listen carefully on whether you're writing down the plural with an "s" or the singular. If the question wants me to write down: "cat", someone's talking about their cat and I write down: "cats", it's incorrect. I would get an "X". Okay, so it's important to be careful, to really listen: is it a singular thing, is it a plural thing? Are they saying "store" or "stores"? Okay?
Using Music to Learn a New Language: A New Strategy
 
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WRIT 118 Blugold Seminar multi-modal project. Works cited: Fonsi, Luis. “Luis Fonsi - Despacito Ft. Daddy Yankee.” YouTube, YouTube, 12 Jan. 2017. Kao, Tung-an, and Oxford, Rebecca L. “Learning Language through Music: A Strategy for Building Inspiration and Motivation.” System: An International Journal of Educational Technology and Applied Linguistics, vol. 43, no. 1, 2014, pp. 114–120. “Multilingual People.” Language Learning, ilanguages.org/bilingual.php.
Views: 3 Will Schaaf
Meeting Challenges, Exploring Solutions in the Adult ESOL Classroom by Lourdes Ortega- 2018
 
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Join us for this one-day conference that provides English Language Teaching professionals with a space to learn from one another, share ideas, and network. The day features a plenary by Lourdes Ortega in the field, workshops exploring techniques and ideas to support classroom practice, and presentations focusing on current challenges facing ESOL teachers. Sponsored by the Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (http://www.newschool.edu) at The New School (http://www.newschool.edu). Plenary speaker: Lourdes Ortega - Multilingual Understandings of English Competence and Success People learn English all over the world, and second-language English students are by definition people on their way to becoming bilinguals or multilinguals. Yet all too often their English is construed as deficient and their multilingual prowess is erased. In this talk, I reflect on what it means to be a successful, communicatively competent speaker of  English, in light of the multilingualism of second-language English speakers and the special status of English, with its contested global, international, and lingua franca affordances. I will argue that we cannot understand English competence or learning success, in academic or other contexts, unless we understand English-in-multilingualism and open up our language pedagogies to the psycholinguistic and social realities of multilinguals. We will need to help our students cultivate an awareness of both world Englishes and unequal Englishes (Tupas, 2015). We will also want to include strategies that help them recognize, disrupt, and productively exploit to their advantage the experiences of being positioned by others as a novice, a foreigner, an outside member, or a nonnative speaker. In sum, our pedagogies must show that being competent in English is about being able to negotiate desirable identities with the aid of rich multilingual repertoires, where language always offers identity choices and communication always harbors power struggles. The New School has a long tradition of excellence in the training of teachers of English to speakers of other languages. We welcome participation by professionals who seek to address critical issues in the field and hone their own craft. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2018 AT 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM  John L. Tishman Auditorium, University Center 63 Fifth Avenue, Room U100, New York, NY 10003
Views: 612 The New School
IELTS Reading: Top 10 Tips
 
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How to get a high score on the IELTS Reading. In this video, I am going to give you ten important tips that will help you succeed on the reading module of the IELTS. Prepare yourself for test day by watching this class and taking my quiz at the end. http://www.engvid.com/ielts-reading-top-10-tips/ http://www.goodluckielts.com/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, we are going to talk about the reading module of the IELTS. I'm going to tell you some of my top IELTS reading tips. So let's get started. During the reading module of the IELTS, there will be three passages that you read, and for each passage, there are a bunch of questions you have to answer. The first tip I have for you is: don't spend too much time reading the passages. What happens to a lot of students is they read word-for-word everything. They see a word they don't know, they keep trying to understand the meaning. You don't have to understand everything to understand the passage. If you don't know a word, that's fine. The better thing to do than to slowly read is to use skills such as skimming which means you quickly read for the main idea or scanning, meaning you look for key words or you look for specific detail. A lot of students, what they do for the IELTS is they will actually read the questions first, and then they will read the passage. And that way, they... They know what they're looking for. You don't have to do this; it's one technique. Some students find this a lot easier, other students like to read the passage first and then answer the questions. I recommend trying both out. First do the reading, then the questions, then try to read the questions first and read the passage and see what you like better, what you're more comfortable doing. So the key thing here is: don't read slowly. It's a timed test, you have three parts you have to get through, 40 questions; it's very important that you read quickly. You can start practicing reading quickly also. There are a number of resources out there where you can actually start practicing. And time yourself when you practice, make sure you're not going over time. Number two, similar to number one, my tip is: don't spend too long on each question. Some of the questions are difficult-they're possible, you can do well on them-but some of them, you might be reading and you might think: "Oh, I don't know what the answer is," and you might look at it, and think, and try, and try, and try. Well, the problem is if you spend too much time on a question, there are 40 questions and the one hour limit for the test, it goes by very quickly. So you can spend too much time on each question. So what I recommend is read a question, try to figure out the answer. If you don't know it, you can put a star beside it and come back after. Don't spend too long on any question. You can also take a guess, move on, and come back later. My third tip: spend less time on earlier questions. For the reading module, the... Like I said, there are three passages. The first passage is the easiest, then the second passage, and then the third question. If you spend all your time on the first passage, you're not going to have time to do the second and the third. And, like I said, the first one is easier. So a good idea is to spend less time on the first passage, maybe about 17 minutes, then the second passage maybe spend about 20 minutes, and the third passage maybe 23 minutes. You don't have to follow this exactly, but the main idea is spend less time on part one, more time on part three because part three is harder. My fourth point is: make sure you have enough time to transfer your answers. They will have an answer sheet and you're supposed to write your answers on it. It's very important to leave yourself time to transfer your answers from your test paper to the answer sheet. A lot of students, they work through the booklet and then they realize there's no time to transfer their answers, so make sure you leave time for this.
5 tips to improve your writing
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
How to Learn English Vocabulary (and remember it!)
 
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In this lesson, you can learn how to learn English vocabulary as well as how to use and remember it. You can see the common mistakes which many English learners make when learning vocabulary, and you’ll see several simple, practical ideas that you can use to build your English vocabulary and remember what you learn. Learn how to learn and remember English vocabulary quickly and efficiently. See the full version of this lesson with text on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/learn-english-vocabulary. Contents: 1. Learn Only What Has Meaning to You 0:48 2. Learning Active Vocabulary vs. Passive Vocabulary 4:51 3. Learn Vocabulary in Meaningful Phrases and Sentences 7:59 4. How to Review and Remember English Vocabulary 12:33 This lesson will help you: - Understand learning methods that will help you learn English vocabulary. - See what learning active vocabulary is and what learning passive vocabulary is. - Learn vocabulary in meaningful phrases and sentences. - Use methods to review and remember English vocabulary. See more free English lessons like this on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/. Quizlet: https://quizlet.com/ Anki: https://apps.ankiweb.net/
Views: 206655 Oxford Online English
IELTS Writing Task 2: How to write an introduction
 
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A full lesson to learn how to write an introduction for an IELTS essay. This lesson explains the content of the background statement and the thesis statement for an opinion essay. The techniques of writing the introduction can be used in all IELTS essays (both GT and AC). For model essays, tips and more lessons, please see my writing task 2 page: http://ieltsliz.com/ielts-writing-task-2/. If you would like in-depth IELTS training, please visit my store: http://subscriptions.viddler.com/IELTSLizStore
Views: 3676878 IELTS Liz
I Can Read! | Official Video Trailer
 
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Introduce your children to the wonderful world of reading with I Can Read! Browse by reading levels to find great books that are just right for your emerging reader, print out fun activities for them to practice their reading skills, and discover tips and educational materials, book reviews, and more to help them become more enthusiastic readers! Discover where the story begins at www.icanread.com
Views: 18909 HarperKids
Writing Skills: The Paragraph
 
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The paragraph is the most important unit of a well-written essay. The paragraph has a specific structure and standards that make it effective and enjoyable to read. In this writing lesson we will look at how to construct good paragraphs and improve writing with better flow and clarity. After the lesson, take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/writing-skills-paragraph/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about the paragraph. It's a writing lesson, and I want to show people what a paragraph is and how to construct one, what to do, what not to do so you can write very clear, very tight paragraphs. This is especially important for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students but everybody has to follow the exact same rules. Now before I even begin, I must say that I'm talking mostly about academic writing or even business writing. Creative writing like novels or short stories, anything fiction, you can do anything you want. Only always remember: somebody has to read what you wrote so it has to be clear. But academic essays, for example, certain rules you have to follow; you have to be very careful about them. So let's begin. In terms of like the actual way a paragraph looks: you have to indent or skip a line. So let me just make sure you understand what an indent is. This is an indent, the first line a little bit pushed in or you can make sure you skip a line between paragraphs. But don't do both. If you skip a line, don't indent. Okay? That's the main thing. Now, that's in terms of the way it looks. In terms of content -- and this, I can't stress this enough -- very, very, very important: one central idea in one paragraph. Okay? I've seen many people, I've seen many essays where you start a paragraph talking about one thing, and then you go off on a tangent and talk about something completely unrelated. So for example: if you start a paragraph and you're talking about apples, continue to talk about apples. If you go to oranges, that's maybe okay because you're still talking about fruit. But if you start with apples, go to oranges, go to bananas, and then end up with monkeys in space there's a bit of a problem; the reader has no idea what you're talking about. One paragraph, one central idea. Now, make sure that you tell the reader what this central idea is. This is your thesis statement. Okay? It's a very general sentence. All it does is introduce the topic of the paragraph, nothing else. All the details comes after. So speaking of details, we'll talk about details in detail, but all other ideas, all the other sentences, all your sentences with the details must directly relate back to the main idea. So let's say here is your thesis statement; very general, every sentence after must relate back to that thesis statement. Okay? You can't go off to another idea. Everything must support this, must talk about the same topic. Very important. Okay? How long should your paragraph be? Technically, a paragraph could be one sentence, but in an academic essay that rarely happens. But it could be any length you want, as long as you're still on that one topic, as long as you still have things to write and things to say about that topic, say it. If you have four sentences, fine; if you have 10 sentences, also okay. Again, for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students: four, five sentences should be your limit. You can't be too long because you don't have time and you're going to start making mistakes. So now, the details. Very important to have lots of details. Why is this topic important to your overall idea of your essay? Not only tell me what is the topic, what is the thesis statement of the paragraph, make sure you explain to me why this is important to the general idea of the essay. Give me your reasons. Now, why is it important? And then reasons, why you think what you're saying supports this idea. Examples, always use examples because giving me the reasons is okay; examples make me see exactly what you're trying to say. Very easy for me to understand what you're trying to say. Now, in terms of flow, in terms of the way the reader can approach the paragraph, you have to have bridges. What is, what do bridges mean? Basically, when you have one idea in this sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence. Every sentence must have a link to the next sentence. This creates flow, makes it much easier to read and understand, and it keeps you on the one topic. Now, key terms. If you're talking about something specific and you have to use a key term, use it as many times as you need to. Otherwise, avoid repetition. Try not to use the same word more than once in one paragraph. Okay? For example: if you're using the word "moreover" in the paragraph, don't use it, don't use "moreover" again -- use "in addition to", use "furthermore", "another", etc. Try to avoid using one word more than once, especially in the same paragraph.
How to write a good essay: Paraphrasing the question
 
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Do you sometimes struggle to begin writing an essay when taking an exam? Good news! There is an important writing skill that will help you improve your essay introductions. This technique is called "paraphrasing", and it means rewriting something using different words. In this lesson, I will teach you how to paraphrase successfully and how to change essay questions into your own words. These skills are very useful for university and high school students, as well as any students writing English proficiency exams like the TOEFL or IELTS. TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-good-essay-paraphrasing-the-question/ WATCH NEXT: Essay Writing – 6 ways to compare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8WSzwBD7GQ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to teach you something very important for if you're taking any type of test that has a writing component. So, if you are taking the IELTS, the TOEFL, the CELPIP, even just a university test, it can be any type of test, but if you're asked to write something like an essay or a paragraph, this video is for you. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a very important skill that will help improve your marks when it comes to writing on tests. So, let's get started. So, I have here an essay question. This question is actually... I've seen it on the IELTS. You know, you have similar types of questions on the TOEFL, sometimes in university. The question is this: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country. Do you agree or disagree?" Or maybe: "To what extent do you agree or disagree?" So, this is an example of a question you might be asked. Now, a problem a lot of students have is in their answer to this question. They see this, and they think: "Okay, education is the most important factor in the development of a country, yes, I agree." So then they... Or: "I disagree", and they start writing. And what do they write? Usually the very first thing students will write is this: "I agree that education is the single most important factor in the development of a country because..." So, what is the problem with this? Is there any problem to start off your essay with something like this, or to start off your answer? There's a big problem. So I want you to take a moment and think: "What could be the problem with starting your essay off with this sentence?" Okay, well, if you noticed, you have here the word: "education, education, is, is, the single most important, most important factor". If you notice, these are the same. They're the exact same, except for: "I agree that" and "because". The student, here, has used the exact same wording that is in the question. So, if you do this on the IELTS-and many students do this, same with on the TOEFL-you actually will lose marks, and same with in university, because you're not showing your abilities; you're just copying what somebody else has said or what the essay question is. So, in this video, I'm going to show you first off... First off, I'm going to tell you: Don't do this, don't copy. And I'm going to teach you ways in order to improve yourself and your answer by changing this wording. How can you change your introduction so it's different than what the question is? Okay? So, let's look at how to make these changes. Okay, so what we are going to do in order to change the question into a proper answer that doesn't just copy the question, is we are going to paraphrase. So, the word here is: "paraphrase". This might be a new word for you. What does it mean to paraphrase something? Well, when we paraphrase, it means we take a sentence that, you know... We take somebody else's sentence and we change it into our own words. Okay? So, we change the words of a sentence, we also change maybe the sentence structure, but we keep all the same meaning. Okay? So, the meaning from the sentence you copy, it stays the same, same meaning, but different words and different sentence structure. Okay? So it's in your words, but this other person's meaning. So, we are going to paraphrase this example of a question into our own words. So, first we're going to look at how to do that using vocabulary and synonyms. So, we have here the same question: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country." How can we put this into new words or our own words that keep the same meaning? Well, we can use synonyms. So, this might be a new word for you, too. A "synonym". "Synonyms" are words that have the same meaning, but are different words.
Didactical contract
 
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Jan Sølberg, Associate Professor, Department of Science Education, University of Copenhagen
Views: 74 Rebecca L Rutt
Interview with plenary speaker Lourdes Ortega
 
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Lourdes talks to us about what it's like to give the opening plenary and expands on the topic of it - research
Views: 272 IATEFLtalks
Global Network Initiative 2012 Learning Forum: Policy Engagement in the ICT Sector
 
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Global Network Initiative 2012 Learning Forum: Policy Engagement on Business and Human Rights in the ICT Sector GNI's inaugural Learning Forum will bring to Washington, D.C. an exciting lineup of international speakers on cutting-edge issues relating to freedom of expression and privacy rights online. With a focus on emerging challenges to an open Internet around the world, a diverse panel will reflect on the role of companies and other stakeholders on policy issues, including intermediary liability, censorship, and the relationships between governments and companies around the world. Participants Sunil Abraham, Executive Director, Centre for Internet & Society (via videoconference) Dan Baer, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, US Department of State Bob Boorstin, Director, Public Policy, Google Jermyn Brooks, Independent Chair, Global Network Initiative Ian Brown, Senior Research Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute Emily Butselaar, Online Editor, Index on Censorship (via videoconference) Bennett Freeman, Senior Vice President, Sustainability Research and Policy, Calvert Investments Leslie Harris, President and CEO, Center for Democracy and Technology Rebecca Mackinnon, Bernard L. Schwartz Senior Fellow, New America Foundation Mike Newman, Chief Financial Officer, Websense Sara Nordbrand, Sustainable Investment-Corporate Engagement, Church of Sweden Ebele Okobi, Director, Business and Human Rights Program, Yahoo! Meg Roggensack, Senior Advisor, Business & Human Rights, Human Rights First Jillian York, Director for International Freedom of Expression, Electronic Frontier Foundation Moderator John Kampfner, GNI European Advisor and former Chief Executive, Index on Censorship http://www.newamerica.net/events/2012/global_network_initiative
Views: 330 New America
How to give a presentation in English
 
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Deliver a successful English presentation with 12 important tips from an experienced presentations coach. http://www.presentationprep.com/ An essential lesson when English is not your native language. You will learn what to focus on when you are preparing your presentation, as well as how to come across professionally to your audience. Did you understand the video? Take the quiz here: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-give-a-presentation/
Professor Sir Leszek Borysiewicz: Challenges of global health
 
01:09:19
Professor Sir Leszek Borysiewicz, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, delivers a public lecture at Madingley Hall on 24 November 2011. The lecture is chaired by Dr Ron Zimmern, Chairman of the Foundation for Genomics and Population Health, and introduced by Dr Rebecca Lingwood, Director of Continuing Education at the University of Cambridge. Please note that the lecture proper begins at the 4:05 minute point in the video.
Views: 3211 Cambridge University
IELTS Speaking Task 1 - How to get a high score
 
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http://www.goodluckielts.com/ Do you need to take the IELTS? I will teach you everything you need to get a higher score in Task 1 of the Speaking section of the exam! A lot of people have to take the IELTS exam when they immigrate or study overseas. Even if your English is good, you could get a low score in the Speaking section if you are not prepared. If you are taking this test, this video will help you. I'll tell you what to expect and give you a lot of tips and strategies to do well! To test your understanding of the video, take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/ielts-speaking-task-1/ and for more IELTS tips, strategies, secrets, and sample questions and answers, go to Good Luck IELTS: http://www.goodluckielts.com/ Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's lesson, we will be looking at how to do well on the speaking part of the IELTS. So the speaking part of the IELTS is divided up into three sections. Today, we're just going to be looking at section No. 1. So first of all, I will explain how to do well -- oh, sorry. First, I'll explain what happens in Part 1 of the IELTS. And from there, we'll look at some things you should do to do well and some things you shouldn't do, okay? So let's get started. So what happens in Part 1 of the IELTS? Well, first of all, the speaking Part 1 of the IELTS is for both those taking the General IELTS exam and the Academic. So whether you're taking the Academic or the General IELTS, it's the same test with the same questions. Okay. It lasts between four to five minutes. It's made up of first an introduction. So the examiner is going to introduce himself or herself. Then, you will introduce yourself. So for example, "Hi. My name is Emma. Nice to meet you." Okay, so there's an introduction. And then, the examiner is going to ask you some questions about yourself. So these questions aren't that difficult. Usually, they're about where you're from. So for example what city you were born in, where you grew up. They might be about work. They might be about what you study, about your friends, about your hobbies, food, sports, and another thing I don't have up here, family. Family is also common on this part of the IELTS. Okay? So usually, the examiner, after introducing himself or herself, they will talk to you about two of these topics. Okay?" Now, the way they mark this part of the IELTS is they're looking specifically for pronunciation, okay? So can they understand what you're saying? Do you pronounce things well? They're going to be looking at fluency. So what's "fluency"? Well, do you go, "Uh, um, uh, uh" a lot during the test? Or do you speak very clearly, in a very nice rhythmic way? Do you use organizers or transitions? "First of all, secondly, finally." Do you use words like this? "Another reason." Or do you have problems speaking at a normal rate? So they look at that in fluency." Then, they mark you also on vocabulary. Do you use words like "good, bad" a lot? Those are very low-level words. Or do you use high level words that really show off your vocabulary?" The final thing you're marked on is grammar and accuracy. So for example, do you only use the present test for the whole test or are you able to correctly use the present tense, the past tense, present perfect, future? How well is your grammar? Okay? So don't panic. Maybe you're weak in grammar. Maybe you make some mistakes in grammar. But you're marked equally on these four components, okay? So now, let's look at some tips on how to do well on Part 1 of the speaking part of the IELTS. Okay. So what are some of the things we should do to get a good mark in Part 1 of the IELTS for speaking? Well, we have a list here of dos. Okay? So these are things you want to do. So the first thing that's very important is when you first meet the examiner, okay? If you're very nervous, and you don't make eye-contact, and you look at the floor the whole time, you're not going to do well on the IELTS even if your English is pretty good. So it's very important to present yourself with confidence, okay? You want to go into that test and know you're going to do well. If you think you're going to do well, you're going to do a lot better. Okay? If you think you're going to do badly, you're probably going to do badly. So think you're going to do well, and be confident. Okay? Another important thing is be friendly. Okay. You want to smile. Body language is actually very important in the IELTS. You want to make eye-contact, okay? So don't look at your feet. Don't look at your hands. Look at the examiner. But you don't have to stare at them, okay? Just look at them when you talk.
Group Project 2: Supportive Behaviour Guidance
 
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Group Project 2: Supportive Behaviour Guidance Newsletter Alex Craddock, Marina Monterroso Perez, Terri Armstrong, Mal Rose, Faith DeVries, Arielle Russell, Nicole Giesbrecht, Julia Van Hemert, Rebecca Betts Niagara College ECUC 1130 Professor L. Milligan December 7 , 2018
Views: 13 Alex Craddock
When to use CAPITAL LETTERS in English
 
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Do you know when to use capital letters in titles? It seems so confusing. Some letters are capitalized and some are not. In this lesson, I focus on the extra-confusing words -- the ones that are sometimes capitalized and sometimes not! You'll learn the easy capitalization rules for writing about subjects, courses, companies, workplaces, occupations, and job titles. You'll also learn how to capitalize the names of movies, shows, books, songs, reports, articles, and more. You can do this -- watch and learn! Then take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/capital-letters-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid, and this lesson is about confusing capitals. Now, usually when you learn the rules of English capitalization, certain words are always capitalized. Okay? For example, the first word in a sentence, the word "I", the names of people and places, and so on. Okay? Some words are always capitalized, but in this lesson I'm not going to review all of the rules of capitalization, but I am going to show you about when to capitalize certain words and when not to capitalize them, because sometimes the same words are capitalized in one context, but not capitalized in another context. But it's not hard to understand; it's actually very easy. Okay? So I'm going to explain it to you right now. Let's get started. So, the first one is in the area of a subject or a course. For example, if we're talking about a subject that you study, for example, algebra, then you do not capitalize it. For example, if you say: "I'm studying algebra this year." Okay? So you're just talking about the subject, and therefore it's not capitalized. But if you're talking about the subject as a course, as the name of a course, then you do capitalize it. Okay? For example: "This year I'm taking Algebra 101." Okay? That's the name of that course, so you do capitalize it then. Okay? Let's look at another example. "She's studying psychology. This year she's studying... She's taking Psychology 201." Or: "She's enrolled in the Psychology 201 class." Okay? Excuse me. All right. Another example: "I would like to study business in university." Okay? The person is being very general, just talking about the subject. But: "This year I'm taking a course called Global Business." Okay? Now you're giving the name of the course, right? So what's the rule here? If we're just talking about the general subject, no capital; if we're talking about the course, then yes, we do capitalize it. Okay? All right. There is one little exception: When we're talking about languages, and this is always true. So if you're studying French or whether you're taking French 101, you're always going to capitalize the name of a language. Okay? And that's just because in English we always capitalize the name of a language; doesn't matter which one. Okay? That's it. All right. Now, when it comes to places, let's look at how it works. So, for example, if I say: "She works in a bank." Okay? A bank, the bank, it's just the place, the building or whatever. Okay? The business. So then it's not capitalized. But if I say: "She works at the Brookfield Bank", now I gave you the name of the bank, so therefore it is capitalized. Okay? Because, again, the name of something is capitalized; the name of a person, or a place. Right? So then it will be capitalized. Or I say: "I went to the library." Okay? "I often study at the library." Okay? Just a library in general, not capitalized. Or: "I often visit the Toronto Public Library." Now I'm giving you the name of a specific library, right? So, of course, it gets capitalized. Got it? Okay. Or: "He goes to university." Okay? He's in university, just a regular word so we don't capitalize it. But: "He got admission to the University of Oxford." Okay, now we're giving the name of the university, so you do have to capitalize it. Okay? Got it? All right. So I hope that's pretty clear so far. All right? So when we're giving the name of a course or we're giving a name of the particular place, like a bank, a library, university, a school, a business-right?-then you're going to capitalize it; and otherwise, in general, not. Okay. Now let's look when we're talking about professions and titles. So, the rule is like this: If you're just talking about... Let's say: "I went to see the doctor." Okay? Or: "I need to see a doctor." So if before the profession you say the word "a" or "the"-okay?-then you don't capitalize it because you're just talking about a doctor in general; you're not giving the name of the doctor, you're not saying which doctor. So, here we just say: "I need to see a doctor." Or: "I have an appointment with Dr. Patel." Now this is the name of the doctor, right? So then we need to capitalize the "D" for "Doctor" and, of course, his or her name. All right? Next: "I would like to speak to the professor." Okay? "The professor", again, general, so no capital, but here: "You need to make an appointment to see Professor Brown." […]
UNICEF at Oxford: Education experts to confer on children...
 
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Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies Chair Rebecca Winthrop explains why education is a crucial element of humanitarian response Credits: Producer:Rachel Bonham Carter
Views: 556 UNICEF
IELTS General: Writing Task 1  – 14 Top Tips!
 
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I've trained thousands of students for success on their IELTS exam by using these 14 tips! Now it's your turn. You'll learn what you MUST do to get the highest score on your IELTS General Writing Task 1. Find out how to easily identify the type and purpose of each letter, and how to start and end your letter perfectly. Learn to save time and effort by using standard expressions. Understand the scoring criteria, so you know exactly what to do and what NOT to do. Visit http://www.GoodLuckIELTS.com for a free guide to the IELTS, and download my free resource at https://www.engvid.com/ielts-general-task-1-letter-writing/ with sample letters, sample topics, key expressions, tips, and much more. Good luck! Take the quiz on this lesson: https://www.engvid.com/ielts-general-writing-task-1/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. If you need to do the IELTS general exam, I'm sure it's for a very important reason. Perhaps you're trying to immigrate to another country, or get admission to a college program, or join a professional training program. Whatever your reason, I know you want to get the highest marks possible. Right? Of course. So I'm going to help you to do exactly that in one particular area of the exam, and that's in your writing section. Now, in the writing section there are two parts, one is a letter and one is an essay. In this lesson we will focus on how you can get the highest marks possible in the letter-writing section. Okay? The 14 tips that I'm going to give you I promise you, if you apply each one of these things, step by step you're going to get more and more marks. Okay? So stick with me and we will go through them. Let's get started. So, the first thing you have to identify when you read the letter-writing task is: What type of letter am I being asked to write? Is it a formal letter, is it a semi-formal letter, or is it an informal letter? Well, how do you know that? Well, you can know it in a few ways and I'm going to explain them, but one of the ways that you can know it is to look at the second point that you need to understand, is to identify the purpose of the letter because some purposes are more formal than other purposes. All right? For example, some formal letters might ask you to request information; or apply for a job; or complain about a product or a service, maybe to an airline, maybe to a store, something like that; or to make a suggestion or a recommendation. All right? To a shopping mall, to a restaurant, something like that. These are more formal situations. These are when we are writing to people or companies that we don't know. All right? That's the clue: You don't have anybody's name, you just have the name of the company. All right. Semi-formal letters might include things like this: Complaining to a landlord; or explaining something, a problem or a situation to a neighbour; or asking a professor for permission to miss an exam or to submit your assignment late. Whatever it is. Okay? The details vary. Doesn't matter. And here, what's...? What identifies the semi-formal? The semi-formal we know it's still a kind of a formal situation, but here we usually do know somebody's name. You would know the name of your landlord, or your professor, or your neighbour, for example. Right? So that means something in terms of the way that you write the letter, the language, the tone, the style. All of this is affected by whether it's formal, semi-formal, or informal. And I'll explain more to you as we go along. Now, examples of informal letters might be where you're being asked to invite a friend, or thank a friend, or apologize to a friend, or ask for advice from someone that you know. Okay? Here what's important is that you really know this person well and you're probably going to call them by first name. So I'm going to explain exactly how all of this translates into the next step, which is how you begin your letter. So the first step was to identify the type of letter. Second step, the purpose. Now the third step is to open and close the letter correctly. Once you've done steps one and two, you will know how to do this step. Because if it's a formal letter then you start with: "Dear Sir" or "Madam", and you end with: "Yours faithfully". Okay? That's how it is. If it's a semi-formal letter, you will start with something like: "Dear Mr. Brown" or "Dear Ms. Stone" or "Mrs. Stone". "Ms." Is when you don't know if a woman is married or not, or if she's just a modern woman. And you end the semi-formal letter with something like: "Yours sincerely". Okay? What we're trying to do is to match up the formality of the situation with these terms that we're using. Okay? The opening and closing salutations they're called, these are called. All right? Next is the informal one.
OnLine F&I Training Interactive Education Platform
 
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F&I OnLine Training! Why wait for a workshop learn the secrets of running an efficient F&I office! Seriously increase your products sales and generate more income than you ever have before! Learn how to structure subprime deals and sell more cars. You can become a pro in menu selling and make more money! Five day free trial offer! www.chernekconsultingvirtualpro.com
Views: 9361 Rebecca Chernek
The US Alliance System in Asia with a focus on Korea | Victor Cha
 
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A hallmark of the Obama administration’s foreign policy has been the so-called “Pivot” or “Rebalance” to Asia. The terminology has sparked both praise and criticism from scholars and foreign policy experts. Some see it as the beginning of a new era of U.S. grand strategy. Others see it as the last efforts of a great power in decline to hold on to its position of prominence. And yet others see it as a policy driven largely by domestic politics. What are the origins of the pivot to Asia? And what are the prospects for the future in the sectors of politics, security, and trade? Scholar Victor Cha will offer his insights on these questions. He will argue that the pivot or rebalance as a policy has unique and distinct causes that were determined more by dynamics in the region than by inside-the-Beltway politics. Professor Victor D. Cha (Ph.D. Columbia, MA Oxford, BA Columbia) is director of Asian Studies and holds the D.S. Song Chair in the Department of Government and School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. In 2009, he was named as Senior Advisor and the inaugural holder of the new Korea Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. He left the White House in May 2007 after serving since 2004 as Director for Asian Affairs at the National Security Council. At the White House, he was responsible primarily for Japan, the Korean peninsula, Australia/New Zealand and Pacific Island nation affairs. Dr. Cha was also the Deputy Head of Delegation for the United States at the Six Party Talks in Beijing, and received two Outstanding Service commendations during his tenure at the NSC. This video was supported by the Core University Program for Korean Studies through the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and Korean Studies Promotion Service of the Academy of Korean Studies (AKS-2014-OLU-2250003).
Views: 3402 USC KSI
Leading Change Programme: Programme overview with the Academic Directors | London Business School
 
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Listen to the Academic Directors, Richard Jolly and Dan Cable, explain the importance of this programme to ensure change is successfully executed within your organisation Discover more about the programme here: http://bit.ly/2f6Gov2 Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/lbsyoutube Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/lbs
At the Playground
 
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Visual video description: (0:00) Two students at a playground, one in a red sweater and the other in a supportive wheelchair. The student in the red sweater is pushing the student in the wheelchair. The two move from sold pavement onto a dirt or sand ground. They approach a play structure with a ramp and together move up the ramp.
Views: 3032 NCDB OHOA Modules
#VenTESOL & #AVEALMEC Webinar | PLN for Language Teachers by Prof. Julio Palma
 
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#VenTESOL and #AVEALMEC present PLN for Language Teachers Free Webinar presented by Prof. Julio Palma from LUZ. Abstract Personal Learning Network (PLN) is a new world trend in professional development for language teachers. As social networks sprout all over the planet in the digital era, it is essential that we take advantage of this new possibility to create virtual personal platforms to make connections with peers and colleagues who can keep us informed of the latest developments in teaching, approaches, materials, courses, discussions, and the new technological software for teaching and learning other languages. In this presentation, therefore, we are going to show the goals and the benefits of a PLN, the role of the teacher in such a virtual environment, the most important elements and tools to build a PLN, we will describe how intertwine different social networks for promoting collaborative learning and partnership for the benefit of the language teacher. Among the tools that will be shown are those for bookmarking, how to use hashtags for conversations in twitter, how to subscribe to RSS Feedreaders, and we will suggest a short list of relevant leaders in both national and international spheres in the field of language teaching to whom you could incorporate in your PLN. We will provide with online communities and institutions that may lay the foundations for further research and publications which can have a positive impact in the specialized growth of teachers in higher education as well. Biographical Information Julio Palma holds a Bachelor's Degree in Education with a Major in Modern Languages from the Universidad del Zulia where he also completed a Master's Degree in Linguistics and Language Teaching. He is a PhD Candidate at Universidad de Córdova, Spain where he pursues his studies in Modern Languages. Julio has accomplished two online courses on integrating web tools into the classroom, sponsored by the US Embassy E-teacher Program.
Views: 78 Venezuela TESOL
IMD EMBA goes to Silicon Valley – The Start-Up Competition
 
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The expedition’s master-mind and leader, Professor Jim Pulcrano, filters each year through over 120 aspiring entrepreneurs who apply to the IMD Startup competition. With inputs from CTI/KTI, VentureKick and investiere, 25 fortunate ventures are selected to work with IMD's MBA and Executive MBA participants.Jim introduced the startups to the Executive MBA participants – a group of highly talented and experienced international executives, who together analyze and challenge business plans, teams and company strategies for several months. The pinnacle of the experience is six days in Silicon Valley, as the Swiss entrepreneurs and participants travel to meet venture capitalists and angels awaiting to hear fundraising pitches – and hoping to invest. “Some people have said that what we ask our EMBAs to do in Silicon Valley is impossible,” Jim Pulcrano said. “Putting them in the shoes of high-tech entrepreneurs and having them pitch their businesses to Silicon Valley venture Capitalists. It’s real, and it works, and every year I have the privilege of watching our EMBAs rise to that impossible challenge and do a great job.” Jim and the EMBA faculty seek to explore with the participants the mindset of the entrepreneur – an essential objective for any manager. Through the expedition, the EMBAs meet with the people who create, execute, grow and finance new firms. They seem to speak a different language and move at a different speed. Participants are helped to develop a sense of how to create an environment that enables entrepreneurial behavior, drives new-idea generation and assesses chances of success in the marketplace. - Mid-2016, Aleva Neurotherapeutics, a Swiss based company that develops the next generations of implantable Deep Brain Stimulation systems, have recently announced the closing of an $18 million Series C Financing. - January of the same year, MindMaze, a company that combines virtual reality (VR), computer graphics, brain imaging & neuroscience for applications in healthcare, received an investment from the Hinduja Group and others for a valuation in excess of $1 billion. - A few month prior to that, Faceshift AG, a company that offers unique facial tracking technology for animation content creation and human computer interaction used in Star Wars, was acquired by Apple So what do Aleva, Mindmaze and Faceshift have in common? All were chosen through the annual IMD Startup Competition and worked with the IMD EMBA. In 2009, the IMD EMBA class worked with Aleva Neurotherapeutics, pitching the company to a panel of Venture Capitalists in Silicon Valley. In 2012, IMD EMBAs helped drive the success of neurotechnology unicorn MindMaze. A diverse team of Executive MBA participants, including a Russian Asset Management executive, a French corporate business leader, a Brazilian commercial manager and a Danish health minister, partnered with Mindmaze to assess the the start-up opportunities and also do the Silicon Valley pitch. Also in 2012, the EMBAs partnered with Faceshift to do the same.
Views: 1254 IMD business school
English Grammar Tricks - Countable & Uncountable Nouns
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ A furniture? Much books? Do you make mistakes like these? Learn some easy tricks to master countable and uncountable nouns for use in conversation and on exams. http://www.engvid.com/countable-uncountable-nouns/
The Boy With The Incredible Brain (Superhuman Documentary) - Real Stories
 
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An extraordinary documentary on the brainpower of Daniel T, the young Englishman who could be the world’s greatest mental athlete. Daniel is not just a calculating wizard, but also a memory champion and super linguist. He speaks nine languages. Daniel, the oldest of seven children, has been able to do amazing calculations after an epileptic fit when he was 3 years old. He was even able to remember over 22,000 numbers in a public display of his ability. But how does he do it? Leading scientists explore the extraordinary world of this real-life Rainman. Daniel’s psychological make-up is explored by Cambridge University autism expert Professor Simon Baron Cohen who delves into his childhood experiences in an effort to explain his remarkable abilities. In America Daniel meets other extraordinary people like himself, known as “savants” --- including Kim Peek, whose story was the basis of the movie “Rainman”. Brain scientists at the Salk Institute in San Diego, including Professor V S Ramachandra, are astounded at his skills and discover the key to Daniel’s ability is his visual imagery which his brain “sees” when he hears a number, this condition is known as synaesthesia. To show it’s not just numbers Daniel can remember -- he also learns one of the world’s hardest languages, Icelandic, in just one week --- and gets interviewed on Icelandic TV after only 7 days of learning to speak it. Want to watch more full-length Documentaries? Click here: http://bit.ly/1GOzpIu Follow us on Twitter for more - https://twitter.com/realstoriesdocs Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/RealStoriesChannel Instagram - @realstoriesdocs Content licensed from Digital Rights Group (DRG). Any queries, please contact us at: [email protected] Produced by FOCUS PRODUCTIONS LTD
Views: 5801652 Real Stories
Ebola universal vaccine: Antibodies may hold key
 
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GALVESTON, Texas – A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Vanderbilt University, The Scripps Research Institute and Integral Molecular Inc. have learned that antibodies in the blood of people who have survived a strain of the Ebola virus can kill various types of Ebola. The study is currently available in Cell. The findings are significant because it helps researchers further understand the immune response to a virus such as Ebola and could lead to treatments for Ebola as well as other related viruses. The study involved using blood samples from people who had survived the Ebola Bundibugyo strain. When someone has survived an Ebola infection, they have developed antibodies. The question is, can these antibodies protect against a future infection with the virus and related filoviruses? Although several mouse antibody-based treatments have provided protection against Ebola Zaire in animal models, there are no available therapeutics based on antibodies from human survivors and no universal treatments against multiple filoviruses, including Ebola Sudan and Ebola Bundibugyo. In the study, researchers used the blood of seven people who survived Ebola Bundibugyo virus infection during the 2007 outbreak in Uganda to isolate a large number of B cells that produce antibodies, which are the small protein molecules capable of inactivating the virus. “The work on antibodies isolated from survivors of filovirus infections, including Marburg and Ebola, was started by James Crowe’s laboratory at Vanderbilt University together with our laboratory about 3 years ago,” said virologist Alex Bukreyev, professor at UTMB and co-corresponding author. “In this study, we isolated a remarkably diverse array of virus-specific antibodies, which appeared to bind to various parts of the envelope protein of the virus. Some of the antibodies neutralized not only Ebola Bundibugyo virus, but also Ebola Zaire and Sudan viruses.” “The quality of these naturally occurring human antibodies as biological drugs to treat the virus infection is remarkable, and we are doubly encouraged because they recognize multiple species of Ebola,” said immunologist James Crowe, Director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Center. A portion of the isolated antibodies effectively protected mice and guinea pigs against a lethal Ebola Zaire infection. “These data provide the basis for understanding the immune response to filovirus infections in humans,” said Bukreyev. “Our results provide a roadmap to developing a single antibody-based treatment effective against not only infections caused by Ebola Zaire virus, but also caused by related filoviruses.” Other authors of this paper include UTMB’s Xiaoli Shen, Philipp Ilinykh, Natalia Kuzmina, Curtis Klages and Thomas Ksiazek; Andrew Flyak, Rebecca Lampley, Nurgun Kose, Andre Branchizio, Hannah King, Leland Brown, James Slaughter, Gopal Sapparapu and James Crowe, Jr. from Vanderbilt University; Charles Murin, Hannah Turner, Joshua David, Marnie Fusco, Erica Ollmann Saphire and Andrew Ward from The Scripps Research Institute and Christopher Bryan, Edgar Davidson and Benjamin Doranz from Integral Molecular Inc. This study was supported by three grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health – grants AI109711, AI109762 and AI067927 – and by a Defense Threat Reduction Agency award, HDTRA1-13-1-0034.
Views: 538 UTMBHealth
Global Consulting Project: Priya Shah (MBA 2013)
 
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Priya Shah describes her recent MBA consulting project working for CDC--the UK's Development Finance Institution (DFI) based in London. She describes the challenging scope of the brief to analyse the food processing industry across the African continent and her ambition to pursue a career in impact investing in emerging markets.
Liberal Arts Career Week - Social Network Spoof
 
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Liberal Arts Career Development hosts a week-long series of events designed to support students in constructing a professional branding image for the business world. The week provides workshops, seminars, and other opportunities to learn from high-profile industry figures. Each event is designed to give those who attend a competitive advantage when actively pursuing employment or internships. Feb 21-25th Visit http://www.cla.purdue.edu/lacw/ for more details. This video stars the Crazy Monkeys, Purdue's Improv Comedy group.
Views: 392 Purdue Lacd
Cyber Security
 
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Managing enterprise risk in a digital world poses new challenges for corporations. Gilbert + Tobin are currently working with Cognitio, a strategic consulting and engineering firm established and managed by a team of former senior technology executives from the U.S. Intelligence Community to explore these challenges and what they mean for our clients.
Views: 417 Gilbert + Tobin
Learn English Tenses: 4 ways to talk about the FUTURE
 
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How many ways do you know to talk about the future in English? In this video, I will teach you four easy ways to talk about the future: will, going to, the present continuous, and the simple present. I will compare when and how we use these grammatical tenses to talk about the future. After you watch this lesson, quiz yourself to practice and make sure you get it. I know that you will do well. http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-tenses-4-ways-to-talk-about-the-future/ Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's lesson, I'm going to teach you the four futures. Okay? A lot of you know two futures, I think. A lot of you probably know "will" and "going to". I'm going to teach you two more futures today, and teach you how they're different from one another. Okay? So let's get started with the present continuous future. So the present continuous is when you have "be" verb, so "I am", "you are", "he is", "she is", "they are", I don't know if I said "we are", "we are" plus the verb and "ing". Okay? So we have "am", the verb, "ing". This is known as the present continuous. It's usually one of the first things you will learn when you're learning English. So a lot of you know the present continuous, and you think: "Oh, present continuous, it's taking place now." You're right, but we can also use it to talk about the future. We use the present continuous to talk about future that is going to happen very, very soon. So, for example, if you ask me: "Emma, what are you doing this weekend?" Well: "I'm hanging out with my friend, Josh, this weekend." Okay? Or I might say: "I'm shopping this weekend.", "I'm studying this weekend." If you ask me: "What are you doing tonight?" Well, you know, I want to be a good student, so: -"I'm studying tonight. I'm studying tonight." -"What are you doing next week?" -"Well, next week... I'm working next week." Okay? So present continuous is very, very common for when we're talking about the future that's going to happen soon. Not future that's going to happen 2,000 years from now or 50 years from now - no, no, that's far future. We're talking about the future that's going to happen in the next couple of days. Okay? So very, very soon future. We can also use the simple present to talk about the future. So, the simple present is when you take a verb and, you know, it's in the basic form, usually you add an "s". If it's third-person singular, for example: "I leave", "you leave", "he leaves", "she leaves", "they leave", "we leave". So this is all simple present. In your classes, you probably learned we use the simple present when we talk about routine. We can also use the simple present when we're talking about routines in the future. Okay? So, for example... And by this I mean timetables. We use this when we're talking about a schedule event; something that is scheduled to happen in the future. So, this usually has to do with when we're talking about transportation; trains, airplanes, we can use this tense. We can use it when we're talking about TV shows. We can use it when we're talking about restaurants opening and closing, or stores, when they open and close. So we use this when we're thinking about a schedule or a timetable. So here are some examples: "The last train leaves at 6pm today." So 6pm hasn't happened yet. It's in the future, but because this is a schedule event, it's a timetable event, it's a schedule, we can use the simple present. Here's another example: "The restaurant opens at 5pm today." So this hasn't happened yet. Right now, it is 2pm. This is going to happen in the future. But still, I use the simple present because this is a schedule. Okay? Every day the restaurant opens at 5pm. Here's a third example, I like watching TV, imagine I like The Big Bang Theory: "My TV show, The Big Bang Theory, starts at 4pm." So again, it's a routine, it's a schedule that takes place in the future, but it's still a schedule so we can use the simple present here. All right, so these two, even though they're present tenses, they can be used for the future. Now let's look at the two verbs we commonly use for the future or we commonly think of as future verbs. "Be going to" + a verb and "will". So, "be going to" + verb: "I'm going to study.", "I'm going to sleep.", "You are going to watch a video." Okay? These are examples of the "be going to" + verb future. So we use this when we're talking about the near future. Similar to this... So it's not a future that's very, very far away; it's soon, but it's a future where we think something is going to happen, and we have evidence that something is going to happen.