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Government Regulation: Crash Course Government and Politics #47
 
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Today, we’re going to wrap up our discussion of economic policy by looking at government regulation. We're going to talk about the government's goals for the U.S. economy and the policies it employs to achieve those goals. Ever since the New Deal, we've seen an increased role of the government within the economy - even with the deregulation initiatives of President Carter and Reagan in the 80's. Now this is all pretty controversial and we're going to talk about it, as this is a long way from the federal government handed down by the framers of the constitution. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 212674 CrashCourse
Y1/IB 30) Regulation and Market Failure
 
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Y1/IB 30) Regulation and Market Failure. Everything you need to know about Regulation and Market Failure Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 19474 EconplusDal
ECONOMIC REGULATION
 
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In the next two video-lectures, you will learn about some of the different ways that government can promote competition and limit market power. We consider two broad types of policy. In the first video lecture we consider regulatory policy, in which the government sets the firm's price at a prescribed level and limits entry. In the second video we consider antitrust policy, which is concerned with preventing anticompetitive practices like price fixing and with limiting firms’ market power by preventing mergers or breaking up existing firms. We also will talk about the limits and difficulties of government intervention. The government has sometimes stepped in and regulated firms even when a clear indication of anticompetitive behavior is lacking. In fact, because government agencies are susceptible to external influences, sometimes the regulators may end up limiting competition through their interventions. The ability to understand and appreciate the problems associated with both market failure and government failure is an important skill for an economist to possess.
Views: 2324 Thang Nguyen Ngoc
Natural Monopoly and the need for Government Regulation
 
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Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 81111 Jason Welker
What is REGULATORY ECONOMICS? What does REGULATORY ECONOMICS mean?
 
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What is REGULATORY ECONOMICS? What does REGULATORY ECONOMICS mean? REGULATORY ECONOMICS definition - REGULATORY ECONOMICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Regulatory economics is the economics of regulation. It is the application of law by government or independent administrative agencies for various purposes, including remedying market failure, protecting the environment, centrally-planning an economy, enriching well-connected firms, or benefiting politicians (see Regulatory capture). It is not considered to include voluntary regulation in the private sphere. Regulation is generally defined as legislation imposed by a government on individuals and private sector firms in order to regulate and modify economic behaviors. Conflict can occur between public services and commercial procedures (e.g. maximizing profit), the interests of the people using these services (see market failure), and also the interests of those not directly involved in transactions (externalities). Most governments, therefore, have some form of control or regulation to manage these possible conflicts. The ideal goal of economic regulation is to ensure the delivery of a safe and appropriate service, while not discouraging the effective functioning and development of businesses. For example, in most countries, regulation controls the sale and consumption of alcohol and prescription drugs, as well as the food business, provision of personal or residential care, public transport, construction, film and TV, etc. Monopolies, especially those that are difficult to abolish (natural monopoly), are often regulated. The financial sector is also highly regulated. Regulation can have several elements: Public statutes, standards, or statements of expectations. A registration or licensing process to approve and permit the operation of a service, usually by a named organization or person. An inspection process or other form of ensuring standard compliance, including reporting and management of non-compliance with these standards: where there is continued non-compliance, then A de-licensing process through which an organization or person, if judged to be operating unsafely, is ordered to stop or suffer a penalty. Not all types of regulation are government-mandated, so some professional industries and corporations choose to adopt self-regulating models. There can be internal regulation measures within a company, which work towards the mutual benefit of all members. Often, voluntary self-regulation is imposed in order to maintain professionalism, ethics, and industry standards. For example, when a broker purchases a seat on the New York Stock Exchange, there are explicit rules of conduct, or contractual and agreed-upon conditions, to which the broker must conform. The coercive regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission are imposed without regard for any individual's consent or dissent regarding that particular trade. However, in a democracy, there is still collective agreement on the constraint—the body politic as a whole agrees, through its representatives, and imposes the agreement on those participating in the regulated activity. Other examples of voluntary compliance in structured settings include the activities of Major League Baseball, FIFA, and the Royal Yachting Association (the UK's recognized national association for sailing). Regulation in this sense approaches the ideal of an accepted standard of ethics for a given activity to promote the best interests of those participating as well as the continuation of the activity itself within specified limits.....
Views: 972 The Audiopedia
Can the Government Run the Economy?
 
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With the smartest experts and the best economists, could the federal government run the U.S. economy? Could it keep America's $17 trillion economy going like a well-oiled machine? Steve Forbes, Chairman and Editor-in-Chief of Forbes Media, explains why no one person or group can "run" the economy, and why any attempt to do so can only make things worse. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: Is our economy a machine, like an automobile, a train or a power plant? One constantly hears phrases such as the economy “is overheating” or “needs to cool off” or “could use some stimulus.” These aren’t harmless metaphors. They epitomize how economists have taught us to see an economy—as something that can be manipulated, guided or driven. And guess who does the driving? The government. The government is supposed to make sure that the economy “hums” along at an even speed, going neither too fast nor too slow. But the economy is not a machine. It is made up of people, and no one can control what billions of them are going to do. What gets overlooked, underplayed or simply ignored is the extraordinary “churn” in the activities of a free market. New businesses open while others close, constantly. In the U.S. during normal times a half-million or more jobs are created each week, while another half-million are cut. Entrepreneurs continually roll out new products and services, most of which flop. But those that succeed can greatly improve our quality of life. What government can and should do is to positively influence the environment in which this hum of activity takes place through sensible taxation, monetary policy, government spending and regulation. And in almost all instances the best prescription for economic health is “less is more.” Catastrophic mistakes by governments can poison the marketplace, as happened during the Great Depression in the 1930s, to a lesser extent in the 1970s, and then again in the panic of 2008–09. The government’s recent mistakes have been compounded by tax increases and an avalanche of antigrowth regulations from ObamaCare, the Dodd-Frank financial services bill and all those Washington regulatory agencies, such as the FCC, the EPA and the National Labor Relations Board. If you want to understand why the American economy has been growing at the anemic pace of 1 to 2 percent a year, look no further. Again, the idea of an economy that purrs along like a well-oiled machine hurts, not enhances, wealth creation because invariably, it leads to growth retarding government intervention. Which brings us to bubbles. Shouldn’t the government, the argument goes, at least try to stop them from happening? Well, it depends. Those caused by misguided government policies like the housing bubble of the mid 2000’s, yes. Those caused by the free market, no. Bubbles have a bad name, but not all of them are created equal. There are healthy ones and unhealthy ones. The good kind develops when a lot of people simultaneously recognize a great opportunity. Computers are an excellent example. During the early 1980s there was a boom in personal computers–followed by a severe shakeout, when companies such as Atari and Commodore bit the dust. In the late 1990s a number of companies recognized the importance of search engines. Google emerged supreme with Microsoft and others relegated to fractional market shares. For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/can-government-run-economy
Views: 946147 PragerU
Free Market Economics: Uber, Airbnb, & Feastly vs Government Regulation - Learn Liberty
 
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Free Market Economics: The sharing economy connects people with services like Uber, AirBnB, and Feastly. Despite these new ways to connect, many regulators would like to stop it in its tracks. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1M9H7oc Learn Liberty is your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. We don’t have all the answers - but we’ve got a lot of ideas. By working with professors from a range of academic disciplines and letting them share their own opinions, we help you explore new ways of looking for solutions to the world’s problems. Watch more at http://bit.ly/1UleLbP SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP FOLLOW US: Website: https://www.learnliberty.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnLiberty Twitter: https://twitter.com/LearnLiberty Google +: http://bit.ly/1hi66Zz LEARN MORE: Praxis Entrepreneurship Course (program): This 2 month course equips young aspiring entrepreneurs with the knowledge, skills and experiences to lay the foundation for a successful professional life. http://discoverpraxis.teachable.com/ Welcome to the Sharing Economy (podcast): Cato scholars discuss how the sharing economy undermines the regulatory establishment and makes people’s lives better. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFYGt128kCY What is the Sharing Economy? (article): Christopher Koopman explains the sharing economy. http://mercatus.org/publication/what-sharing-economy Level the Playing Field - By Deregulating (essay): Matthew Feeney argues for less regulation, not more, in the sharing economy. http://www.cato-unbound.org/2015/02/10/matthew-feeney/level-playing-field-deregulating Today’s Solutions, Tomorrow’s Problems (article): Christopher Koopman expresses his concerns about regulating the sharing economy. http://mercatus.org/publication/todays-solutions-tomorrows-problems-sharing-economy-uber-lyft
Views: 18390 Learn Liberty
Monetary and Fiscal Policy: Crash Course Government and Politics #48
 
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Today, Craig is going to dive into the controversy of monetary and fiscal policy. Monetary and fiscal policy are ways the government, and most notably the Federal Reserve, influences the economy - for better or for worse. So we’re going to start by looking at monetary policy, and specifically how the Federal Reserve uses interests rates as a means of controlling (or at least attempting to control) inflation. We’ll then move onto fiscal policy - that is the government’s use of taxation to raise and spend money. It’s all, well, pretty controversial, but as it seems Americans hate taxes the most, monetary policy is most often used - meaning that the Federal Reserve plays a hugely significant role in steering the U.S. economy. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 405957 CrashCourse
Price Ceilings and Floors- Economics 2.6
 
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In this video I explain what happens when the government controls market prices. Price ceilings are a legal maximum price and price floors are a minimum legal price. Make sure that you can draw each of them on a demand and supply graph and identify if there is a shortage or a surplus. Keep in mind that your teacher may use the word "binding" to describe the situation where the price control has an effect on the market. If you need more help, check out my Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Next videos showing what happens to consumer surplus, producer surplu, and dead weight loss https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0LXkA9kato All Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF... All Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3... Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 689964 Jacob Clifford
A* Evaluation: Government Failure & Market Forces
 
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In this revision video we recap some of the main causes of government failure including the Law of Unintended Consequences. Evaluating the impact of government interventions - discussing their effectiveness and whether they achieve their aims in an equitable way is an important part of securing top marks in many questions. Remember that most problems are complex and require a combination of policies. How far can we leave problems such as pollution control to market forces? This video is part of a growing series of revision videos on A* Star Evaluation. You can see them all in one place here on the tutor2u Economics channel: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/collections/a-star-evaluations-for-alevel-economics
Views: 2182 tutor2u
Market Failures, Taxes, and Subsidies: Crash Course Economics #21
 
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This week on Crash Course Econ, Jacob and Adriene are talking about failure. Specifically, we're talking about market failures. When markets don't provide a good or service efficiently, that's a market failure. When markets fail, often governments step in to provide those services. Stuff like public education or military protection are good examples of market failures. So, what are some of the ways governments address, market failures? Well, it's funny you should ask, as we also talk about that in this episode. We'll get into taxes and subsidies and externalities and a bunch of other important stuff this week on Crash Course Econ. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 671771 CrashCourse
A Provocative Look at Business, Economics, and Regulation: An Economic Romance (2001)
 
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Russell David "Russ" Roberts (born September 19, 1954) is a research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution well known for communicating economics to non-economists as host of the EconTalk podcast. Roberts was awarded a B.A. in economics in 1975 from the University of North Carolina and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1981 for thesis on the design of government transfer programs under the supervision of Gary Becker. Roberts has taught at George Mason University, Washington University in St. Louis (where he was the founding director of what is now the Center for Experiential Learning), the University of Rochester, Stanford University, and the University of California, Los Angeles. He is a regular commentator on business and economics for National Public Radio's Morning Edition, and has written for the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. Roberts also blogs at Cafe Hayek[11] with Donald J. Boudreaux at George Mason University in Fairfax County, Virginia.[12] He published the novel The Invisible Heart which conveys economic ideas in the context of a narrative. In 2008, Roberts released another novel, The Price of Everything, which addresses concepts such as spontaneous order, price gouging, and market economics in crisis situations. Books The Choice: A Fable of Free Trade and Protectionism (1st ed.). Prentice Hall. 1994. ISBN 0-13-083008-9. OCLC 29357777. The Choice: A Fable of Free Trade and Protectionism (3rd ed.). Prentice Hall. 2006. ISBN 0-13-143354-7. OCLC 70839758. The Choice: A Fable of Free Trade and Protectionism (CD AUDIO). Princeton, NJ: Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic. 2002. OCLC 51110966. The Invisible Heart: An Economic Romance (1st ed.). MIT Press. 2002. ISBN 0-26-268135-8. OCLC 44413917. The Price of Everything: A Parable of Possibility and Prosperity (1st ed.). Princeton University Press. 2008. ISBN 0-691-14335-8. OCLC 231587398. Gambling with other people's money: how perverted incentives caused the financial crisis. Legatum Institute. 2010. ISBN 1-90-740906-8. OCLC 751698980. How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life: An Unexpected Guide to Human Nature and Happiness. Portfolio Hardcover. 2014. ISBN 978-1591846840. OCLC 881681030. Articles and papers "Working Papers in Economics": Domestic Studies Program (Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace): Financing Public Goods. no. E-86-9. 1986. OCLC 39865959. Also published as: "Financing Public Goods". The Journal of Political Economy 95 (2): 420–437. April 1987. doi:10.1086/261463. ISSN 0022-3808. OCLC 4909126868 and 4642352849 Subsidies to Private Spending on Public Goods. no. E-88-22. 1988. OCLC 22871627. Also published as: "Government Subsidies to Private Spending on Public Goods". Public Choice 74 (2): 133–152. September 1985. doi:10.1007/bf00140763. ISSN 0048-5829. OCLC 4896270623 and 820433559 "A Positive Model of Private Charity and Public Transfers". Journal of Political Economy 92 (1): 136–148. February 1984. doi:10.1086/261212. ISSN 0022-3808. OCLC 4642344583 and 4909122660 "A Taxonomy of Public Provision". Public Choice 47 (1): 267–303. 1985. doi:10.1007/BF00119360. ISSN 0048-5829. OCLC 4896262400, 12661266 and 4670565023 "Recipient Preferences and the Design of Government Transfer Programs". Journal of Law and Economics 28 (1): 27–54. April 1985. doi:10.1086/467074. ISSN 0022-2186. OCLC 4645633697 and 4894164421 "Why Comply: One-Sided Enforcement of Price Controls and Victimless Crime Laws". Journal of Legal Studies 18 (2). 1989. ISSN 0047-2530. OCLC 4644767691. With John R. Lott. "A Guide to the Pitfalls of Identifying Price Discrimination". Economic Inquiry 29 (1): 14–23. 1991. doi:10.1111/j.1465-7295.1991.tb01249.x. ISSN 0095-2583. OCLC 4636562702. "When Does a Decrease in a Distortion Increase Welfare?". Economic Letters 39 (1): 37–42. 1992. doi:10.1016/0165-1765(92)90098-J. ISSN 0165-1765. OCLC 4929946941. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russ_Roberts
Views: 736 The Film Archives
Price Controls, Subsidies, and the Risks of Good Intentions: Crash Course Economics #20
 
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So, during times of inflation or deflation, why doesn't the government just set prices? It sounds reasonable, but price ceilings or floors just don't work. Adriene and Jacob explain why. Subsidies, however, are a little different, and sometimes they even work. We'll also explain that. Today you'll learn about stuff like price controls, deadweight loss, subsidies, and efficiency. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 410739 CrashCourse
Taxes on Producers- Microeconomics 2.11 ACDC Econ
 
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I explain excise taxes any show what happens to consumer surplus, producer surplus, and deadweight loss as a result of a tax. Make sure to watch the section about tax incidence and who pays the majority of a tax.
Views: 642325 Jacob Clifford
Economics, Government Regulation, and Cybersecurity
 
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Cybersecurity may be considered both a public and a private good, requiring cooperation and collaboration between the public and private sectors. This can be difficult, given the private sector’s typical suspicion of government assistance. This lecture discusses economics and government regulation in achieving cybersecurity. This video was developed in 2018 by Augusta University through a grant funded by the National Security Agency (NSA). The video is licensed as part of the course "Strategic Cybersecurity" with a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Test 3 - Edge in Economics Revision MC - Government Intervention
 
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Test 3 gives you five questions covering aspects of government intervention in markets
Views: 536 tutor2u
Environmental Econ: Crash Course Economics #22
 
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So, if economics is about choices and how we use our resources, econ probably has a lot to say about the environment, right? Right! In simple terms, pollution is just a market failure. The market is producing more pollution than society wants. This week, Adriene and Jacob focus on the environment, and how economics can be used to control and reduce pollution and emissions. You'll learn about supply and demand, incentives, and how government intervention influences the environment. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 318272 CrashCourse
ECONMOVIES: Government and the Economy- Season 2, Episode 2
 
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Thank you so much for watching and sharing this video. Please subscribe and leave a comment. In this episode of Econmovies, I discuss the role of the government and the two extremes of the economic spectrum: State Socialism and Neoliberalism. I also talk about the views of Milton Friedman. By the way, what did you think about the thought experiment? When is taking private property not theft? I would love to see know where you stand on the economic spectrum. I've always wondered if my viewers were on the left, right, or in the middle. Either way, let me know what you believe and let's get a healthy debate going. After all, these aren't just academic ideas. These economic philosophies shape public policy and, for better or worse, they will effect the lives of millions of people. So, is tax theft? Was Milton right or wrong? What did I leave out in my summery of socialism? Is there another "ism" that I should have mentioned? Let me know. Thanks again. You rock! Watch More Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 19685 Jacob Clifford
Labor Markets and Minimum Wage: Crash Course Economics #28
 
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How much should you get paid for your job? Well, that depends on a lot of factors. Your skill set, the demand for the skills you have, and what other people are getting paid around you all factor in. In a lot of ways, labor markets work on supply and demand, just like many of the markets we talk about in Crash Course Econ. But, again, there aren't a lot of pure, true markets in the world. There are all kinds of oddities and regulations that change the way labor markets work. One common (and kind of controversial one) is the minimum wage. The minimum wage has potential upsides and downsides, and we'll take a look at the various arguments for an against it. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 541160 CrashCourse
Behavioural Economics and Government Policy (Nudge Policies)
 
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Behavioural Economics and Government Policy - Video covering Behavioural Economics and Government Policy. How can behavioural economic influence and improve government economic policy when overcoming market failures Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 22310 EconplusDal
Regulation and Economics
 
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REGULATION AND ECONOMICS Edited by Roger J. Van den Bergh and Alessio M. Pacces Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd ISBN: 978 1 84720 343 4 www.e-elgar.com REGULATION AND THE ECONOMIC PROBLEMS UNDERLYING IT An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers As the editors point out in their clearly explained introduction the research question underpinning most issues relevant to regulation or regulations is the economic logic upon which they are based. Public opinion on regulators and regulation tends to swing from clarion calls for 'deregulation' to pleas for certain industries or activities, to be regulated more stringently, particularly following financial crises, or natural or man-made disasters. Public or indeed private see-sawing between pro-regulatory and anti-regulatory approaches to say, issues of public welfare make this a book which will undoubtedly be of special interest to both lawyers and economists. The editors, Van Den Bergh and Pacces, maintain that 'the economic analysis of regulation, both positive and normative, holds regardless of the specific legal environment in which it is applied.' 'Normative' can be defined roughly here as referring to the economic justifications for regulation and the reasons why it might -- i.e. should -- benefit society. The 'positive' theory of regulation looks at it not as it should be, but as it actually is. The book -- which is actually Volume 9 in Edward Elgar's 'Encyclopedia of Law and Economics, (second edition) -- examines both approaches in refreshing and well-researched detail. In selecting and compiling the seventeen learned essays and articles for this volume, the editors have brought together the cumulative knowledge and insights of an international group of scholars and theorists in both law and economics, many from research institutes and government bodies as well as universities. The book therefore offers a practical orientation to this subject area rather than mere theory. Practical and topical areas discussed include banking, finance and insurance, energy, telecommunications, environmental concerns and the management of risk. Law students as well as students of economics and policy makers within government departments -- indeed anyone concerned with the genesis and implementation of regulatory environments will find this book of exemplary special interest.
Views: 372 ilegal
Regulation and Economics
 
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BOOK REVIEW REGULATION AND ECONOMICS Edited by Roger J. Van den Bergh and Alessio M. Pacces Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd ISBN: 978 1 84720 343 4 www.e-elgar.com REGULATION AND THE ECONOMIC PROBLEMS UNDERLYING IT An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers As the editors point out in their clearly explained introduction the research question underpinning most issues relevant to regulation or regulations is the economic logic upon which they are based. Public opinion on regulators and regulation tends to swing from clarion calls for 'deregulation' to pleas for certain industries or activities, to be regulated more stringently, particularly following financial crises, or natural or man-made disasters. Public or indeed private see-sawing between pro-regulatory and anti-regulatory approaches to say, issues of public welfare make this a book which will undoubtedly be of special interest to both lawyers and economists. The editors, Van Den Bergh and Pacces, maintain that 'the economic analysis of regulation, both positive and normative, holds regardless of the specific legal environment in which it is applied.' 'Normative' can be defined roughly here as referring to the economic justifications for regulation and the reasons why it might -- i.e. should -- benefit society. The 'positive' theory of regulation looks at it not as it should be, but as it actually is. The book -- which is actually Volume 9 in Edward Elgar's 'Encyclopedia of Law and Economics, (second edition) -- examines both approaches in refreshing and well-researched detail. In selecting and compiling the seventeen learned essays and articles for this volume, the editors have brought together the cumulative knowledge and insights of an international group of scholars and theorists in both law and economics, many from research institutes and government bodies as well as universities. The book therefore offers a practical orientation to this subject area rather than mere theory. Practical and topical areas discussed include banking, finance and insurance, energy, telecommunications, environmental concerns and the management of risk. Law students as well as students of economics and policy makers within government departments -- indeed anyone concerned with the genesis and implementation of regulatory environments will find this book of exemplary special interest.
Views: 174 Phillip Taylor
Economics Project: Government Regulations
 
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-- Created using Powtoon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 50 Cierra Cole
What Classical Economics Gets Wrong About Regulation (Botond Kőszegi)
 
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Botond Kőszegi of the Central European University discusses his work on government regulation and the effect that it has on consumer choice. The Royal Economic Society is one of the oldest and most prestigious economic associations in the world. It is a learned society, founded in 1890 to promote the study of economic science. Find out more by visiting www.res.org.uk or on twitter @RoyalEconSoc
Monopolies and Anti-Competitive Markets: Crash Course Economics #25
 
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What is a monopoly? It turns out, it's more than just a board game. It's a terrible, terrible economic practice in which giant corporations dominate markets and hurt consumers. Except when it isn't. In some industries, monopolies are the most efficient way to do business. Utilities like electricity, water, and broadband internet access are probably less efficiently delivered in competitive markets. Come along, and let us monopolize your attention for a few minutes. You might learn something. And you might land on Free Parking. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 517902 CrashCourse
Economics of Regulation
 
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Training on Economics of Regulation by Vamsidhar Ambatipudi
Economics: 3 Myths of Capitalism - Learn Liberty
 
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Not sure what to believe about Capitalism or not sure what it is? Dr. Jeffrey Miron from Harvard University breaks down 3 myths of Capitalism. Learn More: https://www.learnliberty.org/ SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP FOLLOW US: - Website: https://www.learnliberty.org/ - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnLiberty - Twitter: https://twitter.com/LearnLiberty - Google +: http://bit.ly/1hi66Zz LEARN MORE: IHS Summer Seminars: Apply to a attend a free seminar this summer and explore ideas in economics, philosophy, history, law, and more. https://theihs.org/seminars-conferences/summer-seminars/ Uber, Airbnb, & Feastly vs Government Regulation (video): Professor Chris Koopman explains the sharing economy and the consequences of government regulation. https://youtu.be/qvsPXKJe05Q?list=PL-erRSWG3IoDAuJgugVb49eVYtfrsjuh_ Free Market Economics (playlist): Learn more about capitalism and free markets. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL-erRSWG3IoDAuJgugVb49eVYtfrsjuh_ LEARN LIBERTY Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://bit.ly/1UleLbP
Views: 53621 Learn Liberty
Regulating Monopolies: A History of Electricity Regulation - Learn Liberty
 
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Prof. Lynne Kiesling discusses the history of regulating electricity monopolies in America. Conventionally, most people view regulation of monopoly, such as the Sherman Antitrust Act, as one of government's core responsibilities. Kiesling challenges this notion, and finds that government regulation of monopoly actually stifles innovation and hurts consumers. The American electricity industry was booming in the 1890s, with several small firms competing against one another. Over time, Kiesling argues that the fixed costs began to escalate, increasing the cost of entry into the industry. Put another way, large competitors gained a significant competitive edge over smaller competitors through economies of scale. Eventually, in places like New York and Chicago, Kiesling claims that the competitive process led to one large firm. These monopolies were feared by the public, and led to demands for government regulation. The electricity industry, knowing that regulation was coming, used these demands for regulation as cover to construct legal barriers to entry. Ultimately, the regulations passed by the government reduced competition by granting legal monopoly privileges to powerful firms within a certain geographical territory. In modern times, we are seeing the real cost of these old one-size-fits-all regulations: 1) People aren't adjusting their energy consumption behaviors. For instance, in peak hours, technological solutions that could smooth electricity consumption are being ignored. 2) The electricity industry doesn't evolve and account for new types of renewable energy. 3) Innovations have been discouraged. If these archaic regulations were removed, innovations and improvements beneficial to consumers would flourish. For more information, check us out here: http://lrnlbty.co/zcPIQr Watch more videos: http://lrnlbty.co/y5tTcY
Views: 53057 Learn Liberty
Boudreaux on Market Failure, Government Failure and the Economics of Antitrust Regulation
 
01:06:34
Don Boudreaux of George Mason University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about when market failure can be improved by government intervention. After discussing the evolution of economic thinking about externalities and public goods, the conversation turns to the case for government's role in promoting competition via antitrust regulation. Boudreaux argues that the origins of antitrust had nothing to do with protecting consumers from greedy monopolists. The source of political demand for antitrust regulation came from competitors looking for relief from more successful. http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2007/10/boudreaux_on_ma.html
Views: 631 AnkeborgsAnkdamm
Economics of Liberty 2011 Part 25 Government Regulation and the Interventionist State
 
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The Nassau Institute proudly presents Economics of Liberty, Lecture Series. The lectures were conducted May 2 & 3, 2011, by Dr. Richard Ebeling, Professor of Economics at Northwood University, Midland Michigan, USA. The Nassau Institute is grateful to Dr. Ebeling for his assistance, guidance, dedication and fabulous teaching ability. A special, heart felt, thank you is extended to The Templeton Foundations for their generous support, without which this lecture series would not have been possible. We also thank The College of The Bahamas and Professor Randy Forbes for hosting this lecture series in their great auditorium in the new Harry C. Moore Library.
Views: 36 TheNassauInstitute
Economics of Liberty 2011 Part 28 Government Regulation and the Interventionist State
 
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The Nassau Institute proudly presents Economics of Liberty, Lecture Series. The lectures were conducted May 2 & 3, 2011, by Dr. Richard Ebeling, Professor of Economics at Northwood University, Midland Michigan, USA. The Nassau Institute is grateful to Dr. Ebeling for his assistance, guidance, dedication and fabulous teaching ability. A special, heart felt, thank you is extended to The Templeton Foundations for their generous support, without which this lecture series would not have been possible. We also thank The College of The Bahamas and Professor Randy Forbes for hosting this lecture series in their great auditorium in the new Harry C. Moore Library.
Views: 30 TheNassauInstitute
Economic Schools of Thought: Crash Course Economics #14
 
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We talk a lot about Keynesian economics on this show, pretty much because the real world currently runs on Keynesian principles. That said, there are some other economic ideas out there, and today we're going to talk about a few of them. So, if you've been aching to hear about socialism, communism, the Chicago School, or the Austrian School, this episode is for you. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 878892 CrashCourse
What's all the Yellen About? Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve: Crash Course Economics #10
 
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This week on Crash Course Economics, we're talking about monetary policy. The reality of the world is that the United States (and most of the world's economies) are, to varying degrees, Keynesian. When things go wrong, economically, the central bank of the country intervenes to try aand get things back on track. In the United States, the Federal Reserve is the organization that steps in to use monetary policy to steer the economy. When the Fed, as it's called, does step in, there are a few different tacks it can take. The Fed can change interest rates, or it can change the money supply. This is pretty interesting stuff, and it's what we're getting into today. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 855880 CrashCourse
Financial Economics: Update on UK Financial Regulation in 2018
 
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In this video we look at examples of how the regulators in the UK have attempted to reduce the risks of financial instability causing economic damage. This includes requiring the banks to hold larger capital reserves and also subjecting commercial banks to stringent stress tests to see if they can cope with really bad economic events both in the UK and overseas.​ - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 2818 tutor2u
The Economics of Healthcare: Crash Course Econ #29
 
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Why is health care so expensive? Once again, there are a lot of factors in play. Jacob and Adriene look at the many reasons that health care in the US is so expensive, and what exactly we get for all that money. Spoiler alert: countries that spend less and get better results are not that uncommon. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 574016 CrashCourse
Economics of Liberty 2011 Part 27 Government Regulation and the Interventionist State
 
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The Nassau Institute proudly presents Economics of Liberty, Lecture Series. The lectures were conducted May 2 & 3, 2011, by Dr. Richard Ebeling, Professor of Economics at Northwood University, Midland Michigan, USA. The Nassau Institute is grateful to Dr. Ebeling for his assistance, guidance, dedication and fabulous teaching ability. A special, heart felt, thank you is extended to The Templeton Foundations for their generous support, without which this lecture series would not have been possible. We also thank The College of The Bahamas and Professor Randy Forbes for hosting this lecture series in their great auditorium in the new Harry C. Moore Library.
Views: 13 TheNassauInstitute
The real truth about the 2008 financial crisis | Brian S. Wesbury | TEDxCountyLineRoad
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The Great Economic Myth of 2008, challenging the accounting to accounting principal. Brian Wesbury is Chief Economist at First Trust Advisors L.P., a financial services firm based in Wheaton, Illinois. Mr. Wesbury has been a member of the Academic Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago since 1999. In 2012, he was named a Fellow of the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, TX where he works closely with its 4%-Growth Project. His writing appears in various magazines, newspapers and blogs, and he appears regularly on Fox, Bloomberg, CNBCand BNN Canada TV. In 1995 and 1996, he served as Chief Economist for the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. The Wall Street Journal ranked Mr. Wesbury the nation’s #1 U.S. economic forecaster in 2001, and USA Today ranked him as one of the nation’s top 10 forecasters in 2004. Mr. Wesbury began his career in 1982 at the Harris Bank in Chicago. Former positions include Vice President and Economist for the Chicago Corporation and Senior Vice President and Chief Economist for Griffin, Kubik, Stephens, & Thompson. Mr. Wesbury received an M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management, and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Montana. McGraw-Hill published his first book, The New Era of Wealth, in October 1999. His most recent book, It’s Not As Bad As You Think, was published in November 2009 by John Wiley & Sons. In 2011, Mr. Wesbury received the University of Montana’s Distinguished Alumni Award. This award honors outstanding alumni who have “brought honor to the University, the state or the nation.” There have been 267 recipients of this award out of a potential pool of 91,000 graduates. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 2111639 TEDx Talks
[1/6/17] - 144. The Economics of Government Regulations with Dr. Per Bylund
 
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The show notes page for this episode can be found at: http://www.wakeupcallpodcast.com/regulations Dr. Per Bylund, author of "The Seen, the Unseen, and the Unrealized: How Regulations Affect Our Everyday Lives," joins Adam Camac to discuss the economics of government regulations and how regulations restrict competition and choices and make people poorer.
Government regulation: Where do we go from here? (1977) | ARCHIVES
 
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December 19, 1977: This AEI Public Policy Forum deals with the growth of government regulation, which has stimulated increasing debate in recent years in academic, political, and public policy circles. The issues discussed here range from the practical implementation of given policy objectives to the philosophical basis on which these objectives are decided. Some argue that to improve regulatory activities, a total reassessment of government's role in the private economy is required. Others maintain that past shortcomings result from poorly coordinated government policies. Thus, future policies turn on a consideration of economic incentives and other means of attaining regulatory goals and on a rational assessment of the costs and benefits of each regulatory activity. Panelists: John C. Danforth — Senator (R-Missouri) William Proxmire — Senator (D-Wisconsin) Paul W. MacAvoy — professor of economics at Yale University Harrison Welford — executive associate director for reorganization and management of the Office of Management and Budget Moderator: John Charles Daly Host: Peter Hackes In 1977, transcripts were available by mail for a small fee. Today, they're available to you for free at this link: https://goo.gl/M3uW7W Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Music credit: BY – "synthwave" by places https://goo.gl/BwJKUt Music marked "BY" is used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/ Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #economy #economics #budget #regulation #law
What is deregulation? | Dejargoned
 
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With Brent crude oil prices dropping from $115/barrel in June to $92/barrel last week, its been widely suggested that it's the perfect time to deregulate diesel prices. Deregulation is a reduction or elimination of government control a particular sector with the intend to ultimately allow more space for healthy competition among those sectors.
Views: 6599 Mint
Social Policy: Crash Course Government and Politics #49
 
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Today, Craig is going to talk about social policy - in the United States this means achieving one of three goals: protecting Americans from risk, promoting equal opportunity, or assisting the poor. Many Americans strongly believe in individualism, that is self-reliance, but since the Great Depression and the New Deal the government’s role has increased significantly. We’re going to focus on two social policies that came out of the New Deal - Social Security and what we tend to think of as “welfare” - and talk about why they’re still around now and potentially the future. These and other social policies are not without controversy, as things tend to be when involving our tax dollars, and we’re going to talk about that too. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudiosSupport is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.orgAll attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 252532 CrashCourse
Economics of Liberty 2011 Part 29 Government Regulation and the Interventionist State
 
04:24
The Nassau Institute proudly presents Economics of Liberty, Lecture Series. The lectures were conducted May 2 & 3, 2011, by Dr. Richard Ebeling, Professor of Economics at Northwood University, Midland Michigan, USA. The Nassau Institute is grateful to Dr. Ebeling for his assistance, guidance, dedication and fabulous teaching ability. A special, heart felt, thank you is extended to The Templeton Foundations for their generous support, without which this lecture series would not have been possible. We also thank The College of The Bahamas and Professor Randy Forbes for hosting this lecture series in their great auditorium in the new Harry C. Moore Library.
Views: 15 TheNassauInstitute
Economics of Liberty 2011 Part 26 Government Regulation and the Interventionist State
 
09:53
The Nassau Institute proudly presents Economics of Liberty, Lecture Series. The lectures were conducted May 2 & 3, 2011, by Dr. Richard Ebeling, Professor of Economics at Northwood University, Midland Michigan, USA. The Nassau Institute is grateful to Dr. Ebeling for his assistance, guidance, dedication and fabulous teaching ability. A special, heart felt, thank you is extended to The Templeton Foundations for their generous support, without which this lecture series would not have been possible. We also thank The College of The Bahamas and Professor Randy Forbes for hosting this lecture series in their great auditorium in the new Harry C. Moore Library.
Views: 22 TheNassauInstitute
Y1/IB 28) Indirect Tax and Market Failure
 
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Y1/IB 28) Indirect Tax and Market Failure. Everything you need for Indirect Taxation to solve Market Failure Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 25004 EconplusDal
Milton Friedman - Government Regulation
 
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MIlton Friedman discusses the damage done to life and liberty by government regulation. The FDA is his prime example. http://www.LibertyPen.com
Views: 57974 LibertyPen
Part 1 Economics 101
 
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APES Notes for enbio about economics and government regulations.
Views: 98 Dustin Matthews
Industrial Policy of INDIA 1948,56,77,80,90 & 91 भारत की औद्योगिक नीति (1991)
 
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INDIAN ECONOMY MC GRAW HILL http://amzn.to/2pmqYr0 affiliate-program.amazon INDUSTRIAL POLICY is a formal declaration by the government whereby it outlines its general policies for industries. The industrial Policy of a country generally deals with the ideology of the current political dispensation The main objective of any industrial policy is to augment the industrial production and thereby enhance the industrial growth which leads to economic growth by optimum utilization of resources. Modernization. Balanced industrial development & Balanced regional development. Coordinated development of large as well as  small, medium and cottage enterprises. Determination of area of operation under private and public sector. Enhance cordial relations between workers and management and proper utilization of the domestic / foreign capital. To set the direction of foreign investors and foreign investment After independence India has been released industrial policy around 6 time. 1. Industrial Policy — 1948 2. Industrial Policy — 1956 3. Industrial Policy — 1977 4. Industrial Policy — 1980 5. Industrial Policy — 1990 6. Industrial Policy — 1991 Industrial Policy — 1948 The government of India declared its first industrial policy on 6th April, 1948.  The industrial policy 1948 was presented in the parliament by then industry minister dr. Shyama Prasad Mukherjee.India ushered into a mixed economy taking the society on socialistic pattern.The large industries were classified in four categories. Strategic industries (public sector) Basic / key industries (public-cum-private sector) Important industries (controlled private sector) Other industries (private and co-operative sector) Apart from the four fold classification of the industries (the Industrial Policy 1948) endeavoured to protect cottage & small scale industries by according them priority status. Industrial Policy — 1956 The Industrial Policy Resolution of 1956 was based upon the Mahalanobis Model of growth. This Model suggested that there should be an emphasis on the heavy industries, which can lead the Indian Economy to a long term higher growth path.Three Fold Classification of the Industries Schedule A Industries Schedule B Industries Schedule C Industries Monopolistic and Restrictive Trade Practice under MRTP Act, 1969 The Monopolistic and Restrictive Trade Practices Act, 1969, was enacted To ensure that the operation of the economic system does not result in the concentration of economic power in hands of few, To provide for the control of monopolies, and To prohibit monopolistic and restrictive trade practices. The MRTP Act extends to the whole of India except Jammu and Kashmir. The Foreign Exchange Regulation Act (FERA) was legislation passed in India in 1973 that imposed strict regulations on certain kinds of payments, the dealings in foreign exchange (forex)and securities and the transactions which had an indirect impact on the foreign exchange and the import and export of currency. The bill was formulated with the aim of regulating payments and foreign exchange. FERA applied to all citizens of India, all over India. The idea was to regulate the foreign payments, regulate the dealings in Foreign Exchange & securities and conservation of Foreign exchange for the nation Industrial Policy — 1991 On July 24, 1991, Government of India announced its new industrial policy with an aim to correct the distortion and weakness of the Industrial Structure of the countrySalient Features This new model of economic reforms is commonly known as the LPG or Liberalisation, Privatisation and Globalisation model. The primary objective of this model was to make the economy of India the fastest developing economy in the globe with capabilities that help it match up with the biggest economies of the world
Views: 144227 Know Economics
Economics of Rail Nationalisation (A Level Economics Revision)
 
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This revision video for A Level Economics students assesses some of the arguments for and against taking the UK rail industry into full state ownership. For more key points on this crucial topic visit: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/reference/economics-of-rail-nationalisation UK Rail Industry – Key Statistics (2016-17) Contributes £10bn per annum to GDP (gross value added) Employs 216,000 people (rail industry and supply chain) 3% passenger modal share 77% passenger satisfaction with punctuality £4.2 billion in government financial support (subsidy) 1.73 billion passenger journeys per year 48% of rail journeys cited for commuting Passenger income as a share of rail industry income has risen from 51% in 2010 to 71% in 2015 Broader issues in this debate over state v private A successful UK rail industry is needed to sustain and improve competitiveness / support tourism / regional economic balance UK rail network is expensive to run – in part a legacy from the Victorian age. Huge investment needs – unlikely that the private sector can provide sufficient funds Market failure issues are also important e.g. positive externalities from encouraging an increase in mass transport / reducing traffic congestion, affordable rail and geographical mobility of labour Much of the UK rail industry is already under state control / or direct regulation e.g. nearly half of fares, Government sets terms of franchises Affordability of rail travel is a major issue although dynamic pricing cuts fares for many segments of the market (e.g. student railcards)
Views: 10637 tutor2u
Micro Unit 4 Intro- Imperfect Competition AP Economics
 
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Unit Playlist- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6EB232876EAB5521&feature=iv&src_vid=sOwUge69wzQ&annotation_id=annotation_620264 A quick overview of what you will cover in Unit 4 of Microeconomics. Virtually all teachers will cover the same topics, but keep in mind that some teachers might teach a few concepts in a different order.
Views: 100875 Jacob Clifford
Free Market Economy Debate: Why People Need to Learn Economics
 
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Free Market economy debate is in response to a video made by a fellow YouTube creator called Mexie who has decided to diss the Free Market economy with what I feel erroneous arguments and baseless claims. In my response I touch upon several things regarding regulation, private ownership, famines, healthcare etc. It is for this reason I feel it is why people need to learn Economics because so many people out there like Mexie wrongly confuse what a Free Market economy is. If people understood the Free Market it would go a long way to at least addressing the difference between what exists today to that of what a Free Market is. Capitalism too often wrongly gets the blame for what is not the fault of Capitalism but that of Corporatism, these are issues I have addressed many times in the past. Mexie believes that there was deregulation and therefore she believes this led to fewer jobs in the marketplace, little does she understand that the causation of fewer jobs was not more competition but the destruction of competition led by big corporations lobbying government for more government regulations. The Free Market economy debate touches briefly on the free market and I explain this clearly on issues such as; healthcare, banking crisis and even in relation to the market regulating itself.