Home
Search results “Gnu arm compiler options”
ARM Development with GCC and Make (1)
 
19:28
First a young (but maturing) GCC-based project implementation is demonstrated, then we unravel the mysteries behind the source and work towards piecing our own minimal project together with a bit of reverse engineering and help from ARM's example code. JLink Reflash video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezPou8W_Ntc
Views: 9723 Vaughn Kottler
GCC compilation Step by Step explanation with Example
 
08:18
This video will explain GCC compilation process with help of exmaple 1. Pre processing 2. Compilation 3. Assember 4. Linking
Views: 23969 HowTo
GCC/Clang Optimizations for Embedded Linux - Khem Raj, Comcast RDK
 
54:05
GCC/Clang Optimizations for Embedded Linux - Khem Raj, Comcast RDK This talk will cover how gcc and clang/LLVM compilers can boost the Embedded Linux Development by optimizing for size and performance on constrained systems. It will also cover specific commandline options that are available for tuning the programs for power/performance/size optimizations and how they impact each other. It will also discuss how can we get better code by helping the compilers by writing "friendly" code. Primarily it will focus on C but will also cover C++. Since we have multiple architectures supporting Embedded Linux, we will also discuss architecture specific tunings and optimizations that can be taken advantage. About Khem Raj Working on deploying Yocto Project/OpenEmbedded into Comcast's community Reference Design Kit for STB, Gateway and IoT platforms. Working on designing optimal open source software development and contribution procedures. Previously worked at Juniper where he was responsible to creating and maintaining Linux base operating system for upcoming Junos( Juniper's Network Operating System) again it was based on Yocto project. He is a contributor and maintainer for pieces in OpenEmbedded and Yocto Project. Last he spoke at ELCE Berlin in 2016
Views: 1625 The Linux Foundation
Embedded Programming Lesson 19: GNU-ARM and Eclipse
 
22:19
This lesson shows how to use the free and unlimited GNU-ARM compiler and the Eclipse-based Integrated Development Environment. Specifically, this lesson uses the Eclipse-based Code Composer Studio (CCS) Integrated Development Environment from Texas Instruments, combined with the free and unlimited GNU-ARM toolset. CCS has been chosen, because it supports the TivaC LaunchPad board, but the discussion will apply to any other Eclipse-based IDE and the GNU-ARM compiler. The lesson starts with instructions on how to download and install the CCS toolset. Next, you will create a new project for TivaC LaunchPad and you will take a look at the code generated for this project in CCS. Next, you will see how to improve this code by adding CMSIS-compliant startup code for GNU-ARM and a universal GNU linker script. You will also see how this new code works and how to eliminate all the remaining, non-standard dependencies on the previous development toolset. The startup code and linker script from this lesson are much closer to production-quality than the typical code distributed by silicon vendors. The code is compliant with CMSIS and will work with any toolset based on GNU-ARM, not just with CCS. You can easily adapt it for any ARM Cortex-M microcontroller. Credits: Background music: http://www.bensound.com External resources for this lesson: 0. Code Downloads: http://www.state-machine.com/quickstart 1. "Are We Shooting Ourselves in the Foot with Stack Overflow?" by Miro Samek, February 2014: http://embeddedgurus.com/state-space/2014/02/are-we-shooting-ourselves-in-the-foot-with-stack-overflow/ 2. "Building Bare-Metal ARM Systems with GNU" Article: Part 1: Getting Started http://www.embedded.com/design/mcus-processors-and-socs/4007119/Building-Bare-Metal-ARM-Systems-with-GNU-Part-1--Getting-Started You can find the links to all remaining Parts (2-10) at the end of Part-1. The PDF version of the whole article is also available from: http://www.state-machine.com/doc/Building_bare-metal_ARM_with_GNU.pdf
Views: 34838 Quantum Leaps, LLC
Understanding how GCC carries out compilation
 
04:06
Learn the steps in which GCC converts C source into an executable. Hope you enjoyed the video! Check out this code here: https://github.com/ebrian/engineerman/tree/master/008 Join my Discord server to chat with me: https://discord.gg/k5VcqDP Check out some code on my GitHub: https://github.com/ebrian/engineerman Tweet me something funny on Twitter: https://twitter.com/_EngineerMan Say hi over at Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/engineermanyt Sincerely, Engineer Man
Views: 4116 Engineer Man
solutions for codeblocks compiler problem
 
04:25
when you have this error "can't find compiler executable in your configured search path's for GNU GCC compiler", this video is the solution for it !
Views: 145729 mariem zraier
How to install and run GCC compiler in Windows
 
17:35
Find More Codes On My Website - http://www.codebind.com/ MinGW, a contraction of “Minimalist GNU for Windows”, is a minimalist development environment for native Microsoft Windows applications. For Downloading MinGW open http://www.mingw.org/ ------------------Online Courses to learn---------------------------- Java - https://bit.ly/2H6wqXk C++ - https://bit.ly/2q8VWl1 AngularJS - https://bit.ly/2qebsLu Python - https://bit.ly/2Eq0VSt C- https://bit.ly/2HfZ6L8 Android - https://bit.ly/2qaRSAS Linux - https://bit.ly/2IwOuqz AWS Certified Solutions Architect - https://bit.ly/2JrGoAF Modern React with Redux - https://bit.ly/2H6wDtA MySQL - https://bit.ly/2qcF63Z ----------------------Follow--------------------------------------------- My Website - http://www.codebind.com My Blog - https://goo.gl/Nd2pFn My Facebook Page - https://goo.gl/eLp2cQ Google+ - https://goo.gl/lvC5FX Twitter - https://twitter.com/ProgrammingKnow Pinterest - https://goo.gl/kCInUp Text Case Converter - https://goo.gl/pVpcwL -------------------------Stuff I use to make videos ------------------- Stuff I use to make videos Windows notebook – http://amzn.to/2zcXPyF Apple MacBook Pro – http://amzn.to/2BTJBZ7 Ubuntu notebook - https://amzn.to/2GE4giY Desktop - http://amzn.to/2zct252 Microphone – http://amzn.to/2zcYbW1 notebook mouse – http://amzn.to/2BVs4Q3 ------------------Facebook Links ---------------------------------------- http://fb.me/ProgrammingKnowledgeLearning/ http://fb.me/AndroidTutorialsForBeginners http://fb.me/Programmingknowledge http://fb.me/CppProgrammingLanguage http://fb.me/JavaTutorialsAndCode http://fb.me/SQLiteTutorial http://fb.me/UbuntuLinuxTutorials http://fb.me/EasyOnlineConverter HOWTO Install the MinGW (GCC) Compiler - install and use GCC in windows 7 x64 Installing C++ compilers Compiler Help g++ Windows Searches related to How to install and run G++ compiler in Windows how to install gcc compiler in windows 7 how to install gnu c++ compiler on windows how to install gcc on windows 7 machine? How to Install MinGW (Minimalist Gnu C/C++ Compiler) Installing and Configuring C/C++ Support Install gcc on windows - GNU Compiler how to install gnu C compiler on Windows
Views: 346573 ProgrammingKnowledge
Installing GNU ARM Eclipse with OpenOCD
 
10:25
This video is a step by step guide showing how to install GNU ARM Eclipse with OpenOCD and develop applications for ARM microcontrollers. Links: http://gnuarmeclipse.github.io/ http://gnuarmeclipse.github.io/install/ https://www.eclipse.org/downloads/ If you get an error when trying to install the Eclipse plugin Unable to read repository at http://gnuarmeclipse.sourceforge.net/updates/content.xml. Received fatal alert: handshake_failure Visit: http://gnuarmeclipse.github.io/blog/2017/01/29/plugins-install-issue/ And follow the given steps to fix this issue
Views: 11594 Isuru Gunasekara
eclipse gcc arm openocd
 
20:50
eclipse, Arm GCC, OpenOcd, Stm32, debug and peripheral register. 1. ECLIPSE NEON DOWNLOAD https://eclipse.org/downloads/download.php?file=/technology/epp/downloads/release/neon/1a/eclipse-cpp-neon-1a-win32-x86_64.zip 2. WINDOWS BUILT TOOLS (WBT) DOWNLOAD https://sourceforge.net/projects/gnuarmeclipse/files/Build%20Tools/ 3. OPEN OCD DOWNLOAD https://github.com/gnuarmeclipse/openocd/releases/download/gae-0.9.0-20150519/gnuarmeclipse-openocd-win64-0.9.0-201505190955-setup.exe 4. GCC TOOLCHAIN DOWNLOAD (4.7 or 4.9) https://launchpad.net/gcc-arm-embedded/4.9/4.9-2015-q3-update/+download/gcc-arm-none-eabi-4_9-2015q3-20150921-win32.exe 5. INSTALL ECLIPSE NEON (request java 1.8) 6. INSTALL WBT AND OPENOCD default path 7. INSTALL GCC ARM default path 8. GOTO ECLIPSE MARKETPLACE AND SEARCH GNU ARM AND INSTALL IT 9. SETUP DEBUG CONFIG 10. SETUP IO REGISTER for peripheral register.
Views: 1376 Muhittin Kaplan
Fix Code Blocks Environment Error Can't find compiler executable in your search path
 
02:08
An easy fix for Code Blocks Environment Error: Can't find compiler executable in your search path. #Codeblockserror Link for MinGW: https://sourceforge.net/projects/mingw/?source=dlp
Views: 268349 Sid's E Classroom
Using VS and VS Code for Embedded C/C++ Development - Marc Goodner, Microsoft
 
53:32
Using VS and VS Code for Embedded C/C++ Development - Marc Goodner, Microsoft Learn how you can use embedded toolchains with Visual Studio and VS Code. This session will cover usage of both ARM GCC toolchains and Yocto SDKs for the full edit, build, deploy, debug cycle. This session will also cover details on how you can provide your own tools in extensions for these products. About Marc Goodner Marc Goodner is a program manager at Microsoft responsible for the Linux C/C++ workload in Visual Studio. He helped start the Maker Garage group at Microsoft which led to a deeper interest in IoT and eventually an option to install ARM GCC in Visual Studio. None of the light bulbs in his house run the firmware they shipped with.
Views: 7925 The Linux Foundation
Anatomy of Cross-Compilation Toolchains
 
58:43
Anatomy of Cross-Compilation Toolchains - Thomas Petazzoni, Free Electrons All embedded Linux developers use cross-compilation toolchains as part of their daily work. However, few of them really understand precisely what it is, what it contains, how it is organized, how it is created, and the numerous variants and configurations of available cross-compilation toolchains (different ABIs, FPUs, versions, etc.). Through this talk, we will dissect cross-compilation toolchains, identify the different components, discuss the build process of a cross-compilation toolchain, and the different configuration options and how they affect the user of the cross-compilation toolchain. About Thomas Petazzoni Thomas Petazzoni is CTO and embedded Linux engineer at Free Electrons. He contributes to the support of Marvell ARM processors in the Linux kernel, and is a major contributor to the Buildroot embedded Linux build system. As part of his Buildroot work, Thomas has done extensive contributions to the code building cross-compilation toolchains and the code importing existing cross-compilation toolchains in Buildroot.
Views: 7110 The Linux Foundation
GNU Cauldron 2012, Prague, talk5
 
33:41
Identifying compiler options to minimize energy consumption by embedded programs Presenter: Jeremy Bennett During this summer, Embecosm will be running a joint project with Bristol University Department of Computer Science to look at the impact of compiler options on energy consumption by programs on embedded processors. Many people have opinions on this, but it transpires there is very little hard data. Bristol University's equipment can measure the power consumed by a processor in great detail and to fine time resolution. We will test a representative range of programs (suggestions will be solicited from the audience) with a wide range of compiler options. We will use a number of different processors (XMOS, ARM) as well as different processors in the same family (ARM). We will also compare GCC to LLVM. The results will be published in an open access journal to provide a baseline data set for future research. One channel we wish to pursue subsequently is use of MILEPOST technology to automatically select the best low energy options when compiling programs. The project, starting on 9 July, will be led by Jeremy Bennett (Embecosm) and Simon Hollis (Bristol University), with the work carried out by James Pallister of Embecosm, who will then return to Bristol University for a 3-year PhD in this field. The purpose of this talk is to solicit views from the wider GCC community at the start of this project, particularly with regard to the features of GCC that are most likely to yield benefits and should thus be explored. We look forward to presenting the results at next year's meeting.
Views: 95 ITIaKAM
Install pre-build ARM Cross-Compiler
 
05:47
Install pre-build ARM Cross-Compiler from Codesourcery (arm-2011.03-42-arm-none-eabi-i686-pc-linux-gnu)
Views: 3405 Venkatesan Muthukumar
Add GNU ARM Plug-ins to Eclipse IDE
 
03:42
Add GNU ARM Plug-ins to Eclipse IDE http://gnuarmeclipse.sourceforge.net/updates Setup Eclipse with GCC ARM Embedded on 32 bit Ubuntu 16.04 i386 http://embedded-things.blogspot.com/2016/06/setup-eclipse-with-gcc-arm-embedded-on.html
Views: 2624 Andr.oid Eric
Using KEIL ARM Compiler in Atmel Studio
 
02:07
Atmel® Studio 6 is the integrated development platform (IDP) for developing and debugging Atmel ARM® Cortex™-M processor-based and Atmel AVR® microcontroller applications. This introduction video is a start-up guide describing how to use KEIL ARM Compiler in Atmel Studio. Stay connected! Embedded Design Blog: http://www.atmelcorporation.wordpress.com Twitter: http://www.atmel.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.atmel.com/facebook LinkedIn: http://www.atmel.com/linkedin
Views: 6780 Microchip Makes
How to setup cross compiling and build custom kernels for ARM
 
26:56
In this video we'll show how to build a cross-compiler tool chain in Ubuntu, build a custom kernel image and Busybox for the Embedded Artists' LPC3250 OEM Board. This video was an assignment for ES6 lectured at Fontys University.
Views: 29330 glocomz0r
Introduction to the Linker Command File
 
03:24
Explains the basics of Linker Command Files. The full details are available in this article: http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/Linker_Command_File_Primer
Views: 13977 Code Composer
Can't Find CompilerExecutable In Your Search Path(GNU GCC Compiler)
 
02:58
Solving the issue of "Can't Find Compiler Executable In Your Search Path(GNU GCC Compiler)" on Code::Blocks You can also download the latest version of Code::Blocks here : http://www.codeblocks.org/downloads/26
Views: 99842 ZaksonTech
Getting Started with the STM32MP1 Starter pack
 
02:31
Find out more information: http://bit.ly/STM32MP1 Introducing our STM32MP1 microprocessor series with dual Arm® Cortex®-A7 and Cortex®-M4 Cores A general-purpose microprocessor portfolio enabling easy development for a broad range of applications, the STM32MP1 series is based on a heterogeneous single or dual Arm Cortex-A7 and Cortex-M4 cores architecture, strengthening its ability to support multiple and flexible applications, achieving the best performance and power figures at any time. The Cortex-A7 core provides access to open-source operating systems (Linux/Android) while the Cortex-M4 core leverages the STM32 MCU ecosystem. The STM32MP1 comes with many benefits including a rich development ecosystem: Mainlined open-source Linux distribution with Android support available via partners STM32Cube firmware and embedded software libraries for Cortex-M4 core An optional 3D graphics processing unit (GPU) provides for advanced HMI development Rich set of digital and analog peripherals Advanced security features Optimized bill of materials (BOM) thanks to: High integration, packages compatible with low-cost PCB technologies (down to 4-layer plated-through hole (PTH) PCBs) and dedicated Power Management IC (PMIC) Advanced tools from ST and Partners Best-in-class local and online support Worldwide distribution channels Rolling 10-year longevity commitment renewed every year STM32 ecosystem with support for open-source operating systems Developers familiar with the Cortex®-M4 MCU environment will easily find their marks as they will be able to use the same STM32Cube toolset including GCC-based IDEs, STM32CubeProgrammer and STM32CubeMX, which includes the DRAM interface tuning tool for easy configuration of the DRAM sub-system. When developing for the Arm® Cortex®-A7 core, ST helps eliminate potential roadblocks through the development of its mainlined open-source OpenSTLinux Distribution to ensure that porting application software is fast and easy. An extensive third-party ecosystem is available to help developers thanks to the ST Partner Program. Flexible architecture The single or dual Cortex-A7 cores are dedicated to open-source operating systems while the Cortex-M4 core is dedicated to real-time and low-power tasks. Dual Cortex®-A7 cores running at 650 MHz 32-Kbyte L1 Instruction cache 32-Kbyte L1 Data cache 256-Kbyte Level 2 cache Cortex®-M4 core running at 209 MHz a single-precision floating point unit (FPU) a full set of digital signal processor (DSP) instructions memory protection unit for enhanced application security The Cortex-M4 core benefits from an embedded SRAM (448 Kbytes) to run purely deterministic code. For instance, a customer currently using an STM32 MCU based on STM32Cube firmware, could transparently fully re-use his code on the Cortex-M4 core’s 448 Kbytes of SRAM, and add the Linux application (for instance an HMI) running on the Cortex-A7 core(s). To meet a broad range of applications requirements, most peripherals can be allocated to either the Cortex-A7 or Cortex-M4 cores. Power efficiency Dynamic efficiency: the Cortex-A7 and Cortex-M4 cores can be run or stopped independently to achieve the best power efficiency for each processing and real-time application requirement. Low-power modes: Multiple low-power modes are available including: Standby mode: Down to 36 µW. VBAT mode: Down to 4.5 µW. In this mode, it is possible to keep track of time using the real-time clock while keeping the system secure thanks to the tamper detect feature. The STM32MP1 series is available in 3 different lines which are pin-to-pin compatible: STM32MP157: Dual Cortex-A7 cores @ 650 MHz, Cortex-M4 core @ 209 MHz, 3D GPU, DSI display interface and CAN FD STM32MP153: Dual Cortex-A7 cores @ 650 MHz, Cortex-M4 core @ 209 MHz and CAN FD STM32MP151: Single Cortex-A7 core @ 650 MHz, Cortex-M4 core @ 209 MHz Each line comes with a security option (cryptography & secure boot)
Views: 3760 STMicroelectronics
Set Up C++ Development With Visual Studio Code on Windows 10 (VS Code)
 
23:36
In this video I am going to show, How to Set Up C++ Development With Visual Studio Code on Windows 10. We will use MinGW with VS code as our compiler and debugging tool. So First I will show How to install mingw. The we will see how to create, build and compile our first C++ Program on VScode. With an updated VS Code you can do it in the following manner: Hit (Ctrl+P) and type: ext install cpptools Open a folder (Ctrl+K & Ctrl+O) and create a new file inside the folder with the extension .cpp (ex: main.cpp): Type in your code and hit save. Press (Ctrl+Shift+P and type, Configure task runner and then select other at the bottom of the list. { "version": "2.0.0", "tasks": [ { "label": "build hello world", "type": "shell", "command": "g++", "args": [ "-g", "helloworld.cpp" ], "group": { "kind": "build", "isDefault": true } } ] } Hit (Ctrl+Shift+B to run Build task. This will create the .obj and .exe files for the project. For debugging the project, Hit F5 and select C++(Windows). In launch.json file, edit the following line and save the file: Below is an example using the MinGW GDB debugger: { "version": "0.2.0", "configurations": [ { "name": "(gdb) Launch", "type": "cppdbg", "request": "launch", "program": "${workspaceFolder}/a.exe", "args": [], "stopAtEntry": false, "cwd": "${workspaceFolder}", "environment": [], "externalConsole": true, "MIMode": "gdb", "miDebuggerPath": "C:\\mingw\\bin\\gdb.exe", "setupCommands": [ { "description": "Enable pretty-printing for gdb", "text": "-enable-pretty-printing", "ignoreFailures": true } ], "preLaunchTask": "build hello world" } ] } Hit F5. -------------------Online Courses to learn---------------------------- Data Analytics with R Certification Training- http://bit.ly/2rSKHNP DevOps Certification Training - http://bit.ly/2T5P6bQ AWS Architect Certification Training - http://bit.ly/2PRHDeF Python Certification Training for Data Science - http://bit.ly/2BB3PV8 Java, J2EE & SOA Certification Training - http://bit.ly/2EKbwMK AI & Deep Learning with TensorFlow - http://bit.ly/2AeIHUR Big Data Hadoop Certification Training- http://bit.ly/2ReOl31 AWS Architect Certification Training - http://bit.ly/2EJhXjk Selenium Certification Training - http://bit.ly/2BFrfZs Tableau Training & Certification - http://bit.ly/2rODzSK Linux Administration Certification Training-http://bit.ly/2Gy9GQH ----------------------Follow--------------------------------------------- My Website - http://www.codebind.com My Blog - https://goo.gl/Nd2pFn My Facebook Page - https://goo.gl/eLp2cQ Google+ - https://goo.gl/lvC5FX Twitter - https://twitter.com/ProgrammingKnow Pinterest - https://goo.gl/kCInUp Text Case Converter - https://goo.gl/pVpcwL ------------------Facebook Links ---------------------------------------- http://fb.me/ProgrammingKnowledgeLearning/ http://fb.me/AndroidTutorialsForBeginners http://fb.me/Programmingknowledge http://fb.me/CppProgrammingLanguage http://fb.me/JavaTutorialsAndCode http://fb.me/SQLiteTutorial http://fb.me/UbuntuLinuxTutorials http://fb.me/EasyOnlineConverter
Views: 241866 ProgrammingKnowledge
Beaglebone: C/C++ Programming Introduction for ARM Embedded Linux Development using Eclipse CDT
 
45:06
A new version of this video is available (Jan, 2015) See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9yFyWsyyGk This video introduces C and C++ programming on the Beaglebone platform, which is applicable to any embedded Linux development. I quickly introduce how we can program directly on the beaglebone using a terminal window and point out the limitations. I show the steps that are necessary to set up the Eclipse CDT environment and use the Target Management RSE (Remote System Environment) plugin to communicate with the Beaglebone. I then demonstrate how we can use Eclipse CDT IDE to cross-develop (using arm-linux-gnueabi) applications for the ARM architecture. To do this, I write a short program that flashes the user LEDs on the Beaglebone. Finally, I demonstrate how we can set up a cross-debug environment, where we use gdbserver on the arm device and gdb-multiarch on the client device to establish a full debug environment. TangoBravo has pointed out that some paths have been changed in the current Angstrom image (June 2013). For instance, the path to the brightness properties has been changed in the latest version of Angstrom. The old path: /sys/class/leds/beaglebone::us­­­r3/brightness ...is now this: /sys/class/leds/beaglebone:gre­­­en:usr3/brightness So you have to make the change to get the LED to flash. Check your path to verify. If you use this video in your research, please cite: Molloy, D. [DerekMolloyDCU]. (2012, Apr, 10). Beaglebone: C/C++ Programming Introduction for ARM Embedded Linux Development using Eclipse CDT [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFv_-y... One common problem that arises with this setup: If bash reports "file not found" when executing an executable file that exists, the reason is that it doesn't recognise it as a binary file, and attempts to treat it as a script. The hypothetical script should start off with #!/path/to/interpreter and bash cannot find the (non-existent) interpreter so it returns "file not found". This could happen if for example you are running a 64-bit executable on 32-bit machine, or an x86 executable on an ARM target. In Eclipse your executable should display in your source directory as "HelloWorld - [arm/le]" in the project explorer window. If it does *not* then there is a problem with your compiler setup and you need to watch the steps again. If it *does* then one likely problem is if that you are using an ARM Linux platform that uses "hard floats" and that you have compiled using my setup which uses "soft floats". Here are two possible solutions: - Graemefisheratwork let me know that he has found that when using the ubuntu armhf distros, applications should be cross-compiled using arm-linux-gnueabihf- and not arm-linux-gnueabi-. This seems to have worked for him on the ubuntu 12.04 armhf build. - I'm using "Linux omap 3.2.18-psp14 armv71" in this video that I built myself which has defaulted to soft floating point numbers. There are floating-point options in gcc that you have to set when using hardware floating point numbers -- you should add " -mfloat-abi=hard" to your compiler options.
Views: 263622 Derek Molloy
GCC & clang on windows with Visual Studio Code + bash terminal + debugging!
 
19:12
launch.json { "version": "0.2.0", "configurations": [ { "name": "(gdb) Launch", "type": "cppdbg", "request": "launch", "program": "${workspaceRoot}/a.exe", "args": [], "stopAtEntry": false, "cwd": "${workspaceRoot}", "environment": [], "externalConsole": true, "MIMode": "gdb", "miDebuggerPath": "C:/msys64/mingw64/bin/gdb.exe", "setupCommands": [ { "description": "Enable pretty-printing for gdb", "text": "-enable-pretty-printing", "ignoreFailures": true } ] } ] } cpp_properties.json configuration { "name": "MinGW", "intelliSenseMode": "clang-x64", "includePath": [ "${workspaceRoot}", "C:/msys64/mingw64/include", "C:/msys64/mingw64/include/c++/7.2.0", "C:/msys64/mingw64/include/c++/7.2.0/tr1", "C:/msys64/mingw64/include/c++/7.2.0/x86_64-w64-mingw32", "C:/msys64/mingw64/x86_64-w64-mingw32/include" ], "defines": [ "_DEBUG", "UNICODE", "__GNUC__=7", "__cdecl=__attribute__((__cdecl__))" ], "browse": { "path": [ "C:/msys64/mingw64/lib/*", "C:/msys64/mingw64/include", "C:/msys64/mingw64/include/c++/7.2.0", "C:/msys64/mingw64/include/c++/7.2.0/tr1", "C:/msys64/mingw64/include/c++/7.2.0/x86_64-w64-mingw32", "C:/msys64/mingw64/x86_64-w64-mingw32/include" ], "limitSymbolsToIncludedHeaders": true, "databaseFilename": "" } } user settings json { "terminal.integrated.shell.windows": "C:\\msys64\\usr\\bin\\bash.exe", "terminal.integrated.shellArgs.windows": ["-i"], "terminal.integrated.env.windows": { "PATH" : "/mingw64/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/c/Windows/System32:/c/Windows:/c/Windows/System32/Wbem:/c/Windows/System32/WindowsPowerShell/v1.0/" } }
Views: 34791 Daniel Elliott Jones
FDO: Magic 'Make My Program Faster' Compilation Option?
 
57:46
FDO: Magic 'Make My Program Faster' Compilation Option? - Pawel Moll, ARM Feedback Driven Optimisation (FDO), also known as Profile Guided Optimisation (PGO) is a well known code optimisation technique, employed by compilers since mid XX century, yet not widely used in the wild these days. It relies on providing runtime-captured information about code execution (eg. "branch taken or not?") during next code compilation, improving quality of decisions made by compiler heuristics. To be fair, there were good reasons for its demise which I hope to discuss, mainly time and complexity overhead and deployment difficulties, but there is some hope on the horizon, coming with new approach, called AutoFDO and originating at Google, based on statistical profiling (namely Linux perf + extra tools) and source code level attribution. I'll discuss existing support for it available in mainline GCC and LLVM and give examples of real-life, successful deployments. About Pawel Moll I've worked with so called "embedded Linux" for more then ten years now, currently for ARM in Cambridge, UK as a Principal Engineer, with main focus on Linux developer tools, in all possible form and shape. My recent interest include performance analysis and optimisation. Every now and then I also act as a trainer on ARM software courses, write developer articles and give technical talks (including many LinuxCon Europe and ELC-E conferences).
Using make and writing Makefile ( in C++ or C )
 
20:46
In this Video we will see How to use make command and make file and How to make SIMPLE C++ Makefile. A makefile is a specially formatted text file that a UNIX program called 'make' can interpret. Basically, the makefile contains a list of requirements for a program to be 'up to date.' The make program looks at these requirements, checks the timestamps on all the source-files listed in the makefile, and re-compiles any files which have an out-of-date timestamp. generally GCC and Make is used to to compile, link and build your c or C++ program. This is A Simple Makefile Tutorial in which you will learn how to write a makefiles with good makefile example. I will explainn What is a makefile ? Makefile with sub-directories, Makefile steps, Make File Tutorial, makefile c++ tutorial, make file tutorial, how to make software in c++, makefile tutorial g++, makefile template c++. ------------------Online Courses to learn---------------------------- Java - https://bit.ly/2H6wqXk C++ - https://bit.ly/2q8VWl1 AngularJS - https://bit.ly/2qebsLu Python - https://bit.ly/2Eq0VSt C- https://bit.ly/2HfZ6L8 Android - https://bit.ly/2qaRSAS Linux - https://bit.ly/2IwOuqz AWS Certified Solutions Architect - https://bit.ly/2JrGoAF Modern React with Redux - https://bit.ly/2H6wDtA MySQL - https://bit.ly/2qcF63Z ----------------------Follow--------------------------------------------- My Website - http://www.codebind.com My Blog - https://goo.gl/Nd2pFn My Facebook Page - https://goo.gl/eLp2cQ Google+ - https://goo.gl/lvC5FX Twitter - https://twitter.com/ProgrammingKnow Pinterest - https://goo.gl/kCInUp Text Case Converter - https://goo.gl/pVpcwL -------------------------Stuff I use to make videos ------------------- Stuff I use to make videos Windows notebook – http://amzn.to/2zcXPyF Apple MacBook Pro – http://amzn.to/2BTJBZ7 Ubuntu notebook - https://amzn.to/2GE4giY Desktop - http://amzn.to/2zct252 Microphone – http://amzn.to/2zcYbW1 notebook mouse – http://amzn.to/2BVs4Q3 ------------------Facebook Links ---------------------------------------- http://fb.me/ProgrammingKnowledgeLearning/ http://fb.me/AndroidTutorialsForBeginners http://fb.me/Programmingknowledge http://fb.me/CppProgrammingLanguage http://fb.me/JavaTutorialsAndCode http://fb.me/SQLiteTutorial http://fb.me/UbuntuLinuxTutorials http://fb.me/EasyOnlineConverter
Views: 346497 ProgrammingKnowledge
Compiling C programs with gcc
 
05:43
In cs107, we will primarily be using Makefiles to compile our code, but you should know how to use gcc (the GNU Compiler Collection) to compile a C program independently. We will use three primary flags in cs107: -g : embed debugging information into the program so gdb will give us good information. -Og : compile with gdb in mind, so it leaves in variable information and doesn't optimize out too many variables. -std=gnu99 : the flavor of C we will be using for cs107.
Views: 1178 Chris Gregg
Analysing Compiler Optimization Effectiveness on Adapteva Epiphany, ARM and XMOS platforms
 
05:56
http://jpallister.com/wiki http://ww.cs.bris.ac.uk/Research/Micro http://kck.st/PtAZ9O http://www.adapteva.com Energy efficiency is the highest priority for modern software-hardware co-design. The potential for compiler options to impact on power consumption of running programs has often been discussed. However there has never been a comprehensive analysis of the magnitude of that impact, or how it varies between processor architectures and compilers. Our presentation will describe a project we undertook during the Summer of 2012 at the University of Bristol Department of Computer Science and funded by Embecosm, to explore the effect of compiler options on energy consumption of compiled programs. We used an innovative technique to examine the energy consumption of 10 benchmarks when compiled with 87 optimizations performed by GCC and run on five different embedded platforms. Hardware power measurements on each platform were taken to ensure all architectural effects on the energy were captured. A fractional factorial design was used to separate the effects of each optimization and account for interactions between optimizations. The use of this technique, not commonly used in computer science, has made it feasible to analyse 2^87 possible combinations of optimization over the short period of this project. We found that in the majority of cases execution time and energy consumption were highly correlated, but the effect a particular optimization may have is non-trivial due to its interactions with other optimizations. We also found that the structure of the benchmark had a larger effect than the platform on whether the optimization had an impact on energy consumption. No one optimization is universally positive for energy consumption, but for each benchmark and processor architecture we were able to find the optimization with the main effect on power consumption. There is clearly scope for further work on selecting the optimizations that are most beneficial for an individual program. Our presentation will discuss techniques that can potentially achieve this goal, and are the potential subjects of future research. This research was unusual, in that it was funded as a completely open project. A wiki detailed progress from week to week, the relevant open source communities were kept regularly informed, and the results will be published in open access journals.
Views: 1434 jampallister
Development STM32F4 with GNU ARM Eclipse on Windows 10
 
14:06
Development STM32F4 with GNU ARM Eclipse on Windows 10 new version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BApg6yGNRZ0 Readmore at: http://nvtienanh.com/linux/development-stm32f4-with-gnu-arm-eclipse-on-windows-10-18-03-2017/
Views: 6300 nvtienanh
ARM Template Development with VS Code
 
14:05
In this episode of Azure Snippets, we look at using the Visual Studio Code editor to develop ARM templates. We look at which plugins and settings use to develop templates and that might make your life easier. Extensions used in this video: Azure Resource Manager Tools - https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=msazurermtools.azurerm-vscode-tools Azure Resource Managert Snippets - https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=samcogan.arm-snippets Powershell Extension - https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=ms-vscode.PowerShell Azure CLI Tools - https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=ms-vscode.azurecli Azure Repos - https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=ms-vsts.team Azure Account Extension - https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=ms-vscode.azure-account Prettier - https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=esbenp.prettier-vscode Settings Sync - https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=Shan.code-settings-sync Themes: Material Icon Theme - https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=PKief.material-icon-theme Atom One Dark Theme - https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=akamud.vscode-theme-onedark
Views: 280 Sam Cogan
How To Fix Codeblocks GNU GCC Compiler!
 
00:52
SUBSCRIBE TO MY GAMING CHANNEL! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtlEBZ-6A9bcawGh9QOkX9Q The codeblocks compiler may have been tampered with or changed in a way that your programs will no longer run. This is when you want to check out this tutorial. This shows you how to re-configure your codeblocks GNU GCC compiler to work as it should. Please Subscribe! Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheTechSpaceYT Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheTechSpaceYT/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+IIntroI Xbox: https://account.xbox.com/en-US/Profile?xr=mebarnav Steam: https://steamcommunity.com/id/Introhz/
Views: 20446 TheTechSpace
Openhours #7: Cross compiling on x86 Linux systems for ARM (96Boards)
 
55:14
96Boards OpenHours session seven the topic was “How to Cross Compile files on X86 Linux System for 96Boards, libsoc & mraa libraries.” To watch this weeks’ session go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMPG24OgQ-o&feature=em-subs_digest Below is an overview of what was discussed including the time in the video where this topic was discussed. The first topic was a recap of last week’s session: Last week the team discussed “Installing Docker on aarch64 with the Reference Platform Build on a 96Boards CE-edition.” Bill Fletcher was our guest speaker. Here is Bill’s blog that gives you more information: http://www.96boards.org/blog/installing-docker-aarch64-96boards-ce/ This week’s discussion began at 6:40 Robert kicked off the discussion by explaining what cross compiling is and an introduction on our guest speaker for this week – David Mandala who was there to talk about was “How to Cross Compile files on X86 Linux System for 96Boards, libsoc & mraa libraries.” David also wrote a great blog with more detailed information in it that can be found here: http://www.96boards.org/blog/cross-compile-files-x86-linux-to-96boards/ David Mandala began his presentation at 7:35 David began to explain that cross compiling is not your best option but if you do have to do it then he went on to explain different ways you can do this. He then gave some reasons why you may need to cross compile and how it has changed in recent years. 12:13 – David began to go into detail and give specific instructions on what you need to do for a simple compile. He lists different hardware and packages that you will need to do this. 20:08 – David shows a detailed written step-by-step of what to do. He then goes through each step and gives a brief overview. Next week’s 96Boards OpenHours topic will be on the reference platform around 16:06. Be sure to join us https://www.96boards.org/openhours/
Views: 1115 96Boards
How to Setup Atom For C / C++ Development on Windows 10
 
13:04
This is a Instructional Video on how to compile C and C ++ programs in Atom Text Editor, one of the best open source text editors. Links shown in the video: Atom Text Editor: https://atom.io/ MinGW: http://www.mingw.org/ Gpp-compiler package: https://atom.io/packages/gpp-compiler Atom is opensource source code and text editor. Atom can be installed on Windows, Linux and OS X. Atom supports plugins written in Node.js and has embedded Git source control. Atom is developed by GitHub. Atom is build using web technologies and used as a desktop application. In this post we will see how to install Atom editor on your Windows 10 system. -------------------Online Courses to learn---------------------------- Blockchain Course - http://bit.ly/2Mmzcv0 Big Data Hadoop Course - http://bit.ly/2MV97PL Java - https://bit.ly/2H6wqXk C++ - https://bit.ly/2q8VWl1 AngularJS - https://bit.ly/2qebsLu Python - https://bit.ly/2Eq0VSt C- https://bit.ly/2HfZ6L8 Android - https://bit.ly/2qaRSAS Linux - https://bit.ly/2IwOuqz AWS Certified Solutions Architect - https://bit.ly/2JrGoAF Modern React with Redux - https://bit.ly/2H6wDtA MySQL - https://bit.ly/2qcF63Z ----------------------Follow--------------------------------------------- My Website - http://www.codebind.com My Blog - https://goo.gl/Nd2pFn My Facebook Page - https://goo.gl/eLp2cQ Google+ - https://goo.gl/lvC5FX Twitter - https://twitter.com/ProgrammingKnow Pinterest - https://goo.gl/kCInUp Text Case Converter - https://goo.gl/pVpcwL -------------------------Stuff I use to make videos ------------------- Stuff I use to make videos Windows notebook – http://amzn.to/2zcXPyF Apple MacBook Pro – http://amzn.to/2BTJBZ7 Ubuntu notebook - https://amzn.to/2GE4giY Desktop - http://amzn.to/2zct252 Microphone – http://amzn.to/2zcYbW1 notebook mouse – http://amzn.to/2BVs4Q3 ------------------Facebook Links ---------------------------------------- http://fb.me/ProgrammingKnowledgeLearning/ http://fb.me/AndroidTutorialsForBeginners http://fb.me/Programmingknowledge http://fb.me/CppProgrammingLanguage http://fb.me/JavaTutorialsAndCode http://fb.me/SQLiteTutorial http://fb.me/UbuntuLinuxTutorials http://fb.me/EasyOnlineConverter
Views: 58463 ProgrammingKnowledge
C Tutorial | Set Up GCC and Eclipse
 
14:26
***FOR BEST VIEWING: SET TO 720p and FULL SCREEN*** In this video, I will be showing you how to download and install the MinGW GCC compiler and configure it. Then I will show you how to install the CDT C/C++ plug-in into Eclipse and show you how to properly configure that as well. Then write a small HelloWorld script to make sure everything is working properly. CDT for Eclipse: https://eclipse.org/cdt/downloads.php MinGW for Windows users: https://sourceforge.net/projects/mingw-w64/
Views: 8846 Zoltack429
Ignacio EEL4743 Cross-Compile for BeagleBone using CodeBlocks
 
14:11
This tutorial covers how to cross-compile programs developed on one architecture to run on the ARM architecture.This is done using Code::Blocks IDE alongside Uniwin. Compiler settings are changed for Code::Blocks to compile for the ARM architecture. http://www.codeblocks.org/downloads/26 http://sourceforge.net/projects/uniwin/ For more information about Code::Blocks and Uniwin, visit the following site: http://wiki.codeblocks.org/index.php?title=Installing_Uniwin_remote_compiler
Views: 961 Ignacio Naranjo
STM32Fx Toolchain [ENG]
 
15:03
There is a problem with OpenOCD 0.8.0. I recommend using 0.7.0 0:12 -- Download Eclipse C/C++ 1:05 -- Folder STM32_Toolchain 1:20 -- Unzip eclipse 2:02 -- Download Openocd 2:34 - Unzip openocd 2:50 -- Download ST/Link drivers 3:16 -- Unzip ST-Link drivers 3:25 -- Download toolchain 3:56 -- Unzip toolchain 4:18 -- Download GNU ARM Plugin 4:33 -- Download zadig 4:51 -- Install St-Link drivers 5:12 -- Plug STM32 board 5:22 -- Check installed drivers 5:36 -- Install eclipse 5:50 -- Start eclipse 6:38 -- Install GNU ARM Plugin 7:59 -- Create C project 10:07 -- Download Coreutils 10:32 -- Install Coreutils 11:09 -- Compile project 11:44 -- Load program 12:58 -- GDB Configuration #1 13:24 -- GDB Configuration #2 14:28 -- Debug program
Views: 2517 scientificpages
How to Install Codeblocks IDE on Windows 10 with Compilers ( GCC , G++) 64 Bit
 
06:21
Best C++ Complier : How to Install Code:Block in Windows 10 , Windows c++ - Setting up MingW and Code::Blocks in Windows 10 64 Searches related to install codeblocks on windows 10 how to install codeblocks on mac download codeblocks for windows download codeblocks for windows 10 64 bit download codeblocks for windows 8 install gcc windows 1 :- codeblocks download link : http://www.codeblocks.org/downloads/26 2 :- link: codeblocks 17.12 http://www.codeblocks.org/downloads/26 3 :- mirror backup download link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1fXX... Process To Install Code::Blocks :- Step 1: Download Code::Blocks. Go to this website: http://www.codeblocks.org/downloads. Step 2: Select the Binary Relese Option then Select OS(Operating System). Step 3: There would be Six type of Option. Donot Download all the Six File. Step 4: Download the File name called codeblocks-16.01mingw-setup which is in fourth Option. Step 5: Install Code::Blocks. Double click the installer. Step 6: Running in Code::Blocks. You will be prompted with a Compilers auto-detection window and click next for further installation. Step 7:Now Open the Code::Blocks and create a New Project With Console Application Option. Music By-No Copyright Sounds . . . Please!!!!!!!Like and share the video For more video: Subscribe my channel thanks in advance For any query comment below!
Views: 97 Knowledge Hub
Getting started ARM cortex M4 STM32 with Eclipse - Debugger OpenOCD (3/4)
 
06:11
This video is Guidance for Debugging hardware STM32F4 Discovery using openocd plugins in Eclipse. Please look another series (part1 and part2) video if you don't know to install eclipse,ARMplugins and openocd. goodluck
Views: 11652 Akhmad Hendriawan
STM32MP1 microprocessor: continuing the STM32 success story ! (ST at embedded world 2019)
 
07:38
Find out more information: http://bit.ly/ST-EW2019-STM32MP1 http://bit.ly/ST-EW2019-STM32MP1-WIKI We asked Sylvain the following questions: - Could you please tell me about the STM32MP1 ? - STM32MP1: ideal for what kind of application? - Why is the STM32MP1 so special? - What ecosystem does the STM32MP1 come with? - Is the STM32MP1 available? - Could we see a quick demo? - Where to get more info? STM32MP1 microprocessor series with dual Arm® Cortex®-A7 and Cortex®-M4 Cores A general-purpose microprocessor portfolio enabling easy development for a broad range of applications, the STM32MP1 series is based on a heterogeneous single or dual Arm Cortex-A7 and Cortex-M4 cores architecture, strengthening its ability to support multiple and flexible applications, achieving the best performance and power figures at any time. The Cortex-A7 core provides access to open-source operating systems (Linux/Android) while the Cortex-M4 core leverages the STM32 MCU ecosystem. The STM32MP1 comes with many benefits including a rich development ecosystem: Mainlined open-source Linux distribution with Android support available via partners STM32Cube firmware and embedded software libraries for Cortex-M4 core An optional 3D graphics processing unit (GPU) provides for advanced HMI development Rich set of digital and analog peripherals Advanced security features Optimized bill of materials (BOM) thanks to: High integration, packages compatible with low-cost PCB technologies (down to 4-layer plated-through hole (PTH) PCBs) and dedicated Power Management IC (PMIC) Advanced tools from ST and Partners Best-in-class local and online support Worldwide distribution channels Rolling 10-year longevity commitment renewed every year STM32 ecosystem with support for open-source operating systems Developers familiar with the Cortex®-M4 MCU environment will easily find their marks as they will be able to use the same STM32Cube toolset including GCC-based IDEs, STM32CubeProgrammer and STM32CubeMX, which includes the DRAM interface tuning tool for easy configuration of the DRAM sub-system. When developing for the Arm® Cortex®-A7 core, ST helps eliminate potential roadblocks through the development of its mainlined open-source OpenSTLinux Distribution to ensure that porting application software is fast and easy. An extensive third-party ecosystem is available to help developers thanks to the ST Partner Program. Flexible architecture The single or dual Cortex-A7 cores are dedicated to open-source operating systems while the Cortex-M4 core is dedicated to real-time and low-power tasks. Dual Cortex®-A7 cores running at 650 MHz 32-Kbyte L1 Instruction cache 32-Kbyte L1 Data cache 256-Kbyte Level 2 cache Cortex®-M4 core running at 209 MHz a single-precision floating point unit (FPU) a full set of digital signal processor (DSP) instructions memory protection unit for enhanced application security The Cortex-M4 core benefits from an embedded SRAM (448 Kbytes) to run purely deterministic code. For instance, a customer currently using an STM32 MCU based on STM32Cube firmware, could transparently fully re-use his code on the Cortex-M4 core’s 448 Kbytes of SRAM, and add the Linux application (for instance an HMI) running on the Cortex-A7 core(s). To meet a broad range of applications requirements, most peripherals can be allocated to either the Cortex-A7 or Cortex-M4 cores. Power efficiency Dynamic efficiency: the Cortex-A7 and Cortex-M4 cores can be run or stopped independently to achieve the best power efficiency for each processing and real-time application requirement. Low-power modes: Multiple low-power modes are available including: Standby mode: Down to 36 µW. VBAT mode: Down to 4.5 µW. In this mode, it is possible to keep track of time using the real-time clock while keeping the system secure thanks to the tamper detect feature. The STM32MP1 series is available in 3 different lines which are pin-to-pin compatible: STM32MP157: Dual Cortex-A7 cores @ 650 MHz, Cortex-M4 core @ 209 MHz, 3D GPU, DSI display interface and CAN FD STM32MP153: Dual Cortex-A7 cores @ 650 MHz, Cortex-M4 core @ 209 MHz and CAN FD STM32MP151: Single Cortex-A7 core @ 650 MHz, Cortex-M4 core @ 209 MHz Each line comes with a security option (cryptography & secure boot)
Views: 4076 STMicroelectronics
Howto compile Qt 5.4 or newer for Raspberry Pi (Step-by-Step tutorial)
 
06:51
The following how-to video shows step by step how to cross compile Qt 5.4.1 (or later) for Raspberry Pi. All commands can be found below. Web: http://www.tequnique.com Raspberry Pi 2: http://goo.gl/r9iQwp Raspberry Pi 2 Wifi adapter: http://goo.gl/BnHXVl ## # 1.) Setup environment ## mkdir ~/raspberry cd ~/raspberry wget http://www.tequnique.com/dl/raspberry/setdevenv mv setdevenv setdevenv.sh wget http://www.tequnique.com/dl/raspberry/gcc-4.7-linaro-rpi-gnueabihf.tbz tar xfj gcc-4.7-linaro-rpi-gnueabihf.tbz # For 64 bit Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install ia32-libs # OR: sudo apt-get install g++-multilib zlib1g:i386 # older ubuntu versions use: sudo apt-get install g++-multilib ia32-libs # On Raspberry (e.g. using SSH) ssh [email protected]"raspberry ip address" sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install libfontconfig1-dev libsqlite3-dev libxslt1-dev libssl-dev # For QMultimedia: sudo apt-get install libasound2-dev \ libavcodec-dev \ libavformat-dev \ libswscale-dev \ libgstreamer0.10-dev \ libgstreamer-plugins-base0.10-dev \ gstreamer-tools \ gstreamer0.10-plugins-good \ gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad # Shutdown raspberry sudo shutdown -h now # Remove SD card and insert into PC # Copy SD card to PC image # Windows: http://sourceforge.net/projects/win32diskimager/ cd ~/raspberry sudo dd if=/dev/sdb of=raspberry-working-image.img # Mount image sudo /sbin/losetup /dev/loop0 raspberry-working-image.img # Determine block size: 1818624*512 = 931135488. NOTE: "1818624" is the value you get from this command: sudo /sbin/fdisk -l /dev/loop0 sudo mkdir /mnt/raspberry-rootfs sudo mount -o loop,offset=931135488 raspberry-working-image.img /mnt/raspberry-rootfs # Cross compile tools source setdevenv.sh git clone https://gitorious.org/cross-compile-tools/cross-compile-tools.git cd cross-compile-tools sudo ./fixQualifiedLibraryPaths $MOUNTPOINT ~/raspberry/gcc-4.7-linaro-rpi-gnueabihf/bin/arm-linux-gnueabihf-gcc sudo ln -s \ $MOUNTPOINT/opt/vc/include/interface/vmcs_host/linux/vchost_config.h \ $MOUNTPOINT/opt/vc/include/interface/vmcs_host/vchost_config.h cd .. ## # 2.) Qt ##y # Download Qt (you can also use another version or the development GIT branch) wget http://download.qt.io/official_releases/qt/5.4/5.4.1/single/qt-everywhere-opensource-src-5.4.1.tar.xz tar xfvz qt-everywhere-opensource-src-5.4.1.tar.gz cd qt-everywhere-opensource-src-5.4.1 ./configure \ -release \ -opengl es2 \ -optimized-qmake \ -no-pch \ -make libs \ -make tools \ -reduce-exports \ -sysroot /mnt/raspberry-rootfs \ -device linux-rasp-pi-g++ \ -device-option CROSS_COMPILE=~/raspberry/gcc-4.7-linaro-rpi-gnueabihf/bin/arm-linux-gnueabihf- \ -prefix /usr/local/Qt-5.4.1-raspberry \ -opensource -nomake examples -nomake tests \ -confirm-license # Use other values instead of "4" depending on the number of processor cores on your host machine make -j4 sudo make -j4 install cd .. source setdevenv.sh sudo cp -r /usr/local/Qt-5.4.1-raspberry/mkspecs $MOUNTPOINT/usr/local/Qt-5.4.1-raspberry # Unmount image sync sudo umount /mnt/raspberry-rootfs # Copy image back to SD card # Windows: http://sourceforge.net/projects/win32diskimager/ sudo dd bs=4M if=raspberry-working-image.img of=/dev/sdb # The SD card can now be inserted back into the Raspberry Pi. ## # 3.) Setup Qt Creator. We assume that you have installed Qt Creator already. ## 1.) Add Generic linux device 2.) Add compiler: GCC: /home/ham/raspberry/gcc-4.7-linaro-rpi-gnueabihf/bin/arm-linux-gnueabihf-g++ 2.1) Add debugger: /home/ham/raspberry/gcc-4.7-linaro-rpi-gnueabihf/bin/arm-linux-gnueabihf-gdb 3.) Add Qt version: /usr/local/Qt-5.4.1-raspberry/bin/qmake 4.) Add kit: sysroot: /mnt/raspberry-rootfs ## # 4.) Development with Qt Creator ## # Mount Raspberry image EVERY TIME BEFORE development: cd ~/raspberry sudo mount -o loop,offset=931135488 raspberry-working-image.img /mnt/raspberry-rootfs # Add the following lines to the project .pro file: target.path = /home/pi INSTALLS += target # Unmount image AFTER development sync sudo umount /mnt/raspberry-rootfs
Views: 80584 MobileCameraApps
2016 02 17 Advanced Debugging of ARM Cortex M-based Systems
 
50:43
Webinar archive from 2 February 2016
Views: 2469 Atollic tools
Sourcery CodeBench Tutorial: Setting Project Properties
 
02:23
Modify target settings, specify include and library paths, modify compiler settings in Mentor Embedded's Sourcery CodeBench. This is for the ARM/EABI platform.
Views: 665 Mentor Embedded
SEGGER Embedded Studio – Build settings
 
05:48
In this video tutorial we will talk about some of the most central settings for the nRF5 SDK examples in SEGGER Embedded Studio. SEGGER Embedded Studio Manual: https://www.segger.com/downloads/embedded-studio/EmbeddedStudio_Manual This video is part of the Getting started with SEGGER Embedded Studio and the nRF5 SDK tutorial series https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZouRE_Ol8g&list=PLx_tBuQ_KSqGHmzdEL2GWEOeix-S5rgTV
Views: 7235 Nordic Semiconductor
How to install CodeBlocks with Compilers ( GCC , G++ , GDB ... )
 
04:10
Code Blocks is an open-source, cross-platform (Windows, Linux, MacOS), and free C/C++ IDE. It supports many compilers, such as GNU GCC (MinGW and Cygwin) and MS Visual C++. It supports interactive debugging (via GNU GDB or MS CDB). Code Blocks is surprisingly versatile, and in my opinion, much better than the Visual Studio suite. The mother site of Code Blocks is: www.codeblocks.org. How to Install Code Blocks Step 1: Download  Go to: http://www.codeblocks.org/downloads.  Click "Download the binary release".  Select your operating platform (e.g., Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7).  Download the installer with GCC Compiler, e.g., codeblocks-13.12mingw-setup.exe (98 MB) (which includes MinGW's GNU GCC compiler and GNU GDB debugger). Step 2: Install Run the downloaded installer. Accept the default options. Best C/C++ Complier : How to Install Code:Block in Windows 8, 10 Windows c/c++ - Setting up MingW and Code::Blocks in Windows 8,10 64 c/c++ - Setting up MingW and Code::Blocks in Windows 8,10 64 c/c++ - Setting up MingW and Code::Blocks in Windows 8,10 64 c/c++ - Setting up MingW and Code::Blocks in Windows 8,10 64
Views: 411 Swarg
How to install CodeBlocks 13.12 with Compilers ( GCC , G++ , GDB ... )
 
06:22
Best C++ Complier : How to Install Code:Block in Windows 8, Windows c++ - Setting up MingW and Code::Blocks in Windows 8 64 c++ - Setting up MingW and Code::Blocks in Windows 8 64 c++ - Setting up MingW and Code::Blocks in Windows 8 64 c++ - Setting up MingW and Code::Blocks in Windows 8 64
Views: 313898 ProgrammingKnowledge2
ARM Cortex Bluepill Board / EmBitz IDE Tutorial (deutsch) Teil #2
 
15:33
Einführung in die Softwareentwicklung mit dem ARM Cortex anhand der Integrierten Entwicklungsumgebung (IDE) "EmBitz 1.1", basierend auf dem GCC Compiler und St-Link V2 Debugger. Nachträgliche Korrekturen: 1: Der Chip ist ein STM32F103 C8 und nicht "CB". Der CB hat 128KB Flash, der C8 zwar auch 128Kb aber nur 64KB "erreichbar", d.h. die oberen 64KB wurden bei der Herstellung deaktiviert, er meldet sich mit C8 bei Abfrage der ID. Ein Override ist nur möglich mit dem OCD Debugger und einem speziellen Debug Script, welches die ID ignoriert. Dann können 128kb beschrieben werden. 2: Unter "Linker Options" in den "Build Options" muss "LTO" (Link Time Optimization) aktiviert werden, damit der Code erheblich kleiner wird und ungenutzte Segmente entfernt werden. Diese Option hat einen erheblichen Einfluss auf die Codegröße!
Views: 511 Kalter Krieger
Ubuntu 15.10 - Sublime Text 3 3103 - GCC the GNU Compiler Collection
 
00:48
Ubuntu 15.10 Terminal de Gnome 3.16.2 http://www.ubuntu.com Sublime Text 3 3103 https://www.sublimetext.com/ https://www.sublimetext.com/3 GCC, the GNU Compiler Collection https://gcc.gnu.org/
Views: 105 Programming in ...
[Ubuntu Linux Tutorial] How do I install gcc on Ubuntu Linux
 
02:18
[Ubuntu Linux Tutorial] How do I install gcc on Ubuntu Linux. Install gcc in Ubuntu How to Install GCC How To Install GCC 4.8.1 On Ubuntu Searches related to how to install gcc in ubuntu ubuntu install gcc make ubuntu install gcc compiler avr gcc ubuntu install ubuntu install old gcc install gcc 3.4 ubuntu install gcc 4.6.3 ubuntu ubuntu install g++ sudo apt-get install gcc. SUBSCRIBE for more videos!
Views: 237 Hung Nguyen Quang
C Programming, Disassembly, Debugging, Linux, GDB
 
09:56
A brief introduction to GDB and Assembly Language on Intel processors using the venerable C language and GCC compiler toolchain. This is probably more fun than it is informative (and not even all that fun), but maybe it will give somebody ideas... Documentation: man wprintf man gdb man objdump man hexdump Use pinfo -m instead of man for a nice, colorful interface that can be navigated by clicking or using the arrow keys. The IDE used in this video is actually the SciTE text editor. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWYdVmULKW0&feature=related Making simple programs and analysing them with a debugger such as GDB is a great way to learn a little bit about assembly language and machine code. Why delve into machine code during an introductory video? Do we realy need to know that the stack grows downward in memory or that the arguments to a function are pushed onto the stack in reverse order, so they can pop back off in the right order? What's with the wide characters? Why complicate things by adding a function? First of all, functions and assembly are not that hard to grasp. It's just a push and call. We push an address to something onto the stack and call a function. What's so difficult about that? I'm sick of people trying to insulate us from the details. Besides, knowing a little bit about what goes on under the hood makes better hackers and better programmers. That's what we do while learning. We build things and we take them apart to see how they work. I know there is no compelling reason to use wide characters (C90 spec), but I just want to be prepared to understand them when I see them. Yes, it is probably better to use utf-8 and char now that most platforms support it. You can find simple "hello world" programs anywhere that use printf. I wanted my video to be different. And I wanted to let everyone know I'm OK. I haven't died. I've just been busy learning a little C. Oh, and I'll show you why I used a function in a little bit. There is a reason. We have used up nearly the full 10 minutes and it is still just a brief tour. We were only able to cover a small handful of the tools I wanted to demonstrate. Oh well, Linux is so full of toys that it even has a tool to help find them. Type "man apropos" or "pinfo -m apropos" in a terminal for details. Yes, GDB sucks at printing wide character strings, as this video shamelessly points out. It can do it if you include debugging symbols in your program, though, by compiling with gcc -g -o hi hi.c and by downloading a special script for GDB (http://www.linux.com/feature/51836) and putting it in your .gdbrc file. Great. Wide characters of type wchar_t are not necessarily unicode, but, depending on the implementation, do often represent unicode strings. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide_character http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/unicode.html#utf-8 Resources: http://cs.baylor.edu/~donahoo/tools/gdb/tutorial.html http://www.iso-9899.info/wiki/Main_Page http://www.cs.princeton.edu/~benjasik/gdb/gdbtut.html http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Category:X86_Disassembly http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86_calling_conventions#cdecl http://www.linux.com/feature/51836 This video contains parts or visuals of a free software program. You may use it freely according to its particular license: This work is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later version. This work is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details.
Views: 106884 Executive Quest
ARM Development: Intro to Keil 2
 
13:09
Continuation of Part 1, discussion of the intricacies of Keil and how to examine default project settings including how to debug issues with writing to your device's flash.
Views: 3092 Vaughn Kottler