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Prof. Beata Javorcik, Foreign Investment: Technology Transfer and Job Creation
 
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Prof. Beata Javorcik, Foreign Investment: Technology Transfer and Job Creation In Asbar World Forum 2016 in Riyadh
Pl. Session 6: Leveraging FDI for Technology Transfer & Diffusion, Successful Country Case Studies
 
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To effectively leverage FDI as a means to achieve technology transfer and diffusion, countries need to establish an effective national innovation system (NIS) which provides an interface for technology-related global firms activity, supports the development of the absorptive capacities of domestic enterprises and their linkages with international enterprises, and provides a regulatory framework, including a balanced framework for intellectual property that enables the development of a knowledge base and technological capacities. The coherence between FDI policy and other relevant policies (especially innovation and science and technology policy) is important in this regard; and home country policies and international support can also play a role. This session will be the occasion to discuss selected case studies.
Pl. Session 2: Policy Options for the Promotion of Innovation and Technology Transfer through FDI
 
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This session shed light on the policies that are needed in both host and home countries, at national and international levels to encourage technology transfer and dissemination through FDI. In host countries, a clearly-defined strategy and the right mix of policy instruments and business conditions are needed. The session discussed and drew lessons from successful cases to highlight best practice policy frameworks for enhancing technological and innovative contributions of global firms in the context of host developing countries. It also took in to consideration the potential effects of home country policies.
Pl. Session 9:  Investment Promotion Strategies to foster Technology Transfer & know-how
 
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This plenary session, will examine the importance of marketing a country and how to run successful promotion campaigns to attract targeted FDI that would bring new technological processes and management know-how in various sectors. Selected case studies will be made of countries who have successfully attracted fDi of the right kind promoting high-end industries, and benefitted from it.
Beata Javorcik at UNIDO Vienna Investment Conference
 
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Beata Javorcik from University of Oxford speaks at UNIDO Investment Conference about quality FDI facilitating knowledge creation and technology transfer.
Dubai’s technology sector draws billions in FDI
 
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Dubai has reportedly attracted $21.66 billion worth of foreign direct investment in high-end technology transfers in three years. The investments, came mainly from the European Union and the US, have outdone all others in both, the number of projects and capital investments. Their capital investments include $5.7 billion and $3.9 billion, respectively Close to 60 percent of the total capex FDI into Dubai during the last three years have been realized in medium to high-tech sectors, and these have consequently earned the Emirate  the top rank globally in 2018 in the share of FDI in technology transfer such as artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics. This transformation has created new opportunities for businesses across all sectors.
Views: 132 tahawultech·com
Who gains from FDI?
 
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Which countries gain the most from foreign direct investment (FDI)? Which gain the least? FDI reallocates production away from the home country, sharing technology with other countries and helping them grow. As this video discusses, most gains from FDI are reaped by smaller countries. International Trade course: http://mruniversity.com/courses/international-trade Ask a question about the video: http://mruniversity.com/courses/international-trade/who-gains-fdi#QandA Next video: http://mruniversity.com/courses/international-trade/economics-bollywood
Foreign Direct Investment Unit:  Advantages of Foreign Direct Investment
 
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Your IB Economics Course Companion! This is video 2 of 3 videos in “The Foreign Direct Investment Series”. Watch the entire series right here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNI2Up0JUWkFQEU8Vtq5gijMaI3GSazVI The List! Here is the “The List” for “The Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Development Series” For an explanation of the logic of “The Lists” click here: https://youtu.be/dE0fbsgXlFE Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Reasons why MNCs are attracted to developing nations 1. Natural resources 2. Huge markets 3. Low cost of labor 4. Fewer regulations Possible advantages of FDI 1. Increased savings 2. Increased employment 3. Increased education and training 4. Increased research, development, technology and marketing strategies 5. Multiplier effect of increased incomes 6. Increased tax revenue 7. Increased foreign capital 8. Improved infrastructure 9. Increased choice in market place 10. Lower prices in market place 11. Increased free trade Possible disadvantages of FDI 1. MNCs Bring own management teams 2. Too much power to MNCs 3. Practice of transfer pricing 4. Increased pollution due to low regulations 5. MNCs Extract natural resources from host country 6. MNCs use capital intensive production methods 7. MNCs purchase domestic firms 8. MNCs often repatriate profits I hope you find these videos helpful to your study of Economics. Enjoy! Brad Cartwright . Follow on Twitter: IB Specific News and Analysis Daily! https://twitter.com/econ_ib . Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/econcoursecompanion/ Support Econ Course Companion: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=CQS377QG4VM4G&source=url
Views: 22588 Econ Course Companion
Openness, Trade & FDI Evidence Session | LSE Growth Commission 2016
 
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For more videos in this series please see: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLK4elntcUEy1CuBMWmd1PvyCCpHXb7E9e Post Brexit, what is the best relationship for the UK to pursue with the EU, and beyond, to ensure the flow of exports, imports and FDI? Karolina Ekholm (Ministry of Finance, Sweden); Karen Helene Ullveit-Moe (University of Oslo and Bank of Norway); Lionel Fontagné (CEPII), Paola Conconi (ECARES); Will Page (Spotify); and Tim Sarson (KPMG) give evidence and are quizzed by LSE Growth Commissioners Gianmarco Ottaviano, Tim Besley, Chris Pissarides and Richard Davies on Openness, Trade & FDI. This evidence session was held on 21 November 2016 and the London School of Economics & Political Science. http://www.lse.ac.uk/growthcommission #lsegrowth https://twitter.com/hashtag/LSEgrowth?f=tweets Video produced by ECON FILMS
What is FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT? What does FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT mean?
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WORK FROM HOME! Looking for WORKERS for simple Internet data entry JOBS. $15-20 per hour. SIGN UP here - http://jobs.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT? What does FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT mean? FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT meaning - FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT definition - FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A foreign direct investment is an investment in the form of a controlling ownership in a business in one country by an entity based in another country. It is thus distinguished from foreign portfolio investment by a notion of direct control. The origin of the investment does not impact the definition as an FDI: the investment may be made either "inorganically" by buying a company in the target country or "organically" by expanding operations of an existing business in that country. Broadly, foreign direct investment includes "mergers and acquisitions, building new facilities, reinvesting profits earned from overseas operations and intra company loans". In a narrow sense, foreign direct investment refers just to building new facility, a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. FDI is the sum of equity capital, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown the balance of payments. FDI usually involves participation in management, joint-venture, transfer of technology and expertise. Stock of FDI is the net (i.e., outward FDI minus inward FDI) cumulative FDI for any given period. Direct investment excludes investment through purchase of shares. FDI is one example of international factor movements. A foreign direct investment (FDI) is a controlling ownership in a business enterprise in one country by an entity based in another country. Foreign direct investment is distinguished from foreign portfolio investment, a passive investment in the securities of another country such as public stocks and bonds, by the element of "control". According to the Financial Times, "Standard definitions of control use the internationally agreed 10 percent threshold of voting shares, but this is a grey area as often a smaller block of shares will give control in widely held companies. Moreover, control of technology, management, even crucial inputs can confer de facto control." According to Grazia Ietto-Gillies (2012), prior to Stephen Hymer’s theory regarding direct investment in the 1960s, the reasons behind Foreign Direct Investment and Multinational Corporations were explained by neoclassical economics based on macro economic principles. These theories were based on the classical theory of trade in which the motive behind trade was a result of the difference in the costs of production of goods between two countries, focusing on the low cost of production as a motive for a firm’s foreign activity. For example, Joe S. Bain only explained the internationalization challenge through three main principles: absolute cost advantages, product differentiation advantages and economies of scale. Furthermore, the neoclassical theories were created under the assumption of the existence of perfect competition. Intrigued by the motivations behind large foreign investments made by corporations from the United States of America, Hymer developed a framework that went beyond the existing theories, explaining why this phenomenon occurred, since he considered that the previously mentioned theories could not explain foreign investment and its motivations. Facing the challenges of his predecessors, Hymer focused his theory on filling the gaps regarding international investment. The theory proposed by the author approaches international investment from a different and more firm-specific point of view. As opposed to traditional macroeconomics-based theories of investment, Hymer states that there is a difference between mere capital investment, otherwise known as portfolio investment, and direct investment. The difference between the two, which will become the cornerstone of his whole theoretical framework, is the issue of control, meaning that with direct investment firms are able to obtain a greater level of control than with portfolio investment. Furthermore, Hymer proceeds to criticize the neoclassical theories, stating that the theory of capital movements cannot explain international production. Moreover, he clarifies that FDI is not necessarily a movement of funds from a home country to a host country, and that it is concentrated on particular industries within many countries.
Views: 13056 The Audiopedia
Foreign Direct Investment Unit:  Introduction and Overview
 
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Your IB Economics Course Companion! This is video 1 of 3 videos in “The Foreign Direct Investment Series”. Watch the entire series right here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNI2Up0JUWkFQEU8Vtq5gijMaI3GSazVI The List! Here is the “The List” for “The Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Development Series” For an explanation of the logic of “The Lists” click here: https://youtu.be/dE0fbsgXlFE Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Reasons why MNCs are attracted to developing nations 1. Natural resources 2. Huge markets 3. Low cost of labor 4. Fewer regulations Possible advantages of FDI 1. Increased savings 2. Increased employment 3. Increased education and training 4. Increased research, development, technology and marketing strategies 5. Multiplier effect of increased incomes 6. Increased tax revenue 7. Increased foreign capital 8. Improved infrastructure 9. Increased choice in market place 10. Lower prices in market place 11. Increased free trade Possible disadvantages of FDI 1. MNCs Bring own management teams 2. Too much power to MNCs 3. Practice of transfer pricing 4. Increased pollution due to low regulations 5. MNCs Extract natural resources from host country 6. MNCs use capital intensive production methods 7. MNCs purchase domestic firms 8. MNCs often repatriate profits I hope you find these videos helpful to your study of Economics. Enjoy! Brad Cartwright . Follow on Twitter: IB Specific News and Analysis Daily! https://twitter.com/econ_ib . Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/econcoursecompanion/ Support Econ Course Companion: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=CQS377QG4VM4G&source=url
Views: 30397 Econ Course Companion
Pl. Session 5: Trends in National & International FDI Policies
 
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Implications for National Policy Makers and IPAs In the FDI world, the year 2014 was characterized by policy developments. At the national level, countries made their investment framework more welcoming while, at the same time, taking a more nuanced approach to M&As, especially in sensitive industries, primarily for national security reasons. Countries also further developed their outward FDI frameworks, to help their firms invest abroad – the new frontier of national FDI policy making. In both cases, issues related to sustainable development through FDI related technology transfer and innovation play a role. At the international level, the nature of the international investment law and policy regime and its investor-state dispute-settlement mechanism, the role of bilateral investment treaties and the question of rules for state-owned enterprises received special attention, as reflected, e.g., in the discussions of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement. These discussions are of critical importance to national FDI policy makers and IPAs, including as regards attracting knowledge-intensive FDI, as the international investment framework increasingly sets the parameters for national policy making in the FDI area.
FDI and FII - Foreign Investments
 
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This video would describe about two important types of foreign investments- the foreign direct investment and foreign institutional investor. FDI is when a company makes investment in foreign country by setting up the business over there. FII is an entity or institution which makes investment in a foreign country by getting registered in the stock exchange of foreign market to trade in securities.  Foreign companies invest in India to take several advantages like relatively lower wages, cheaper production, new potential customers, tax exemptions, tapping growth potential of market, interest rate arbitrage. It also benefits the host country by providing employment, increasing capital flow, greater investment opportunities, foreign exchange, transfer of new technology, skills & knowledge. When FIIs invests in large in Indian stock market, rupee appreciates and the balance of payment improves When FIIs withdraws, rupee depreciates and the balance of payment weakens A comparison has been made between FDI and FII based on various factors like employment, tax rate, time period etc. FDIs invests in the real economy while the FIIs invests in stock market only. FDIs pay higher taxes as compares to the FIIs FDIs generates mass employment as compared to FIIs that generates no or few employment opportunities Both these foreign investments highly influence the country's economy and financial system. It has its own positive and negative impacts. Do watch the video to know all about FDIs and FIIs. Description link of Video - https://www.slideshare.net/NishaNandani/fdi-and-fii-134079651 Thank you for watching Subscribe to DevTech Finance
Views: 36 DevTech Finance
Foreign Direct Investment | Panel I: Outward FDI
 
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Lindsay Oldenski (PIIE and Georgetown University) and Gary Hufbauer, (PIIE) discuss the conclusions of their book, Outward Foreign Direct Investment and US Exports, Jobs, and R&D: Implications for US Policy, at the Peterson Institute for International Economics on September 19, 2013. C. Fred Bergsten (PIIE) chaired the panel, and Jared Bernstein (CBPP) joined as a discussant. For more information, visit: http://www.piie.com/events/event_detail.cfm?EventID=290
Views: 1148 PetersonInstitute
Liquidity-driven FDI
 
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Speaker: Rahul Mukherjee, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies. Discussant: Anusha Chari, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. http://macrofinance.nipfp.org.in/meetings.html#RM201503 Rahul Mukherjee presents a paper that uses a large dataset of emerging-market acquisitions and finds evidence to support: (i) firms in external finance dependent and intangible sectors are more likely to be targets of foreign acquisitions; (ii) these targets have ownership structures with larger foreign stakes; (iii) these effects are most prominent in countries with low levels of financial development. The regression evidence indicates that liquidity is at least as economically important as technology- or trade-related motives for FDI in emerging-market economies. Anusha Chari discusses the paper.
Views: 69 nipfpmf
What is Foreign Direct Investment? |Talking Economic Development, Marketing Services with David Gray
 
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Why is FDI important? ProfileTree welcomed WAVTEQ Marketing Manager David Gray to not just explain the type of results achieved through this vital aspect of international business but outline his company's global work in this area. David also discussed his marketing experience and passed on some essential advice. He began by explaining WAVTEQ's specialism and their worldwide expertise. "WAVTEQ is the biggest FDI consultancy, data and technology company in the world currently. We have 80 full-time FDI consultants and 16 offices all over the globe. We have offices in the US, Europe, South Korea, India and our technology hub is in Cork. "These offices are strategically placed, so we can target companies who're interested in expanding overseas. "Our main clients are government clients, who we work with to try and attract more foreign investment. We have worked with over 300 government clients from around the globe and have helped them secure over fifty billion worth of Greenfield investment projects since 2014." David went on to describe Foreign Direct Investment (FDI): "Basically it's when a company wants to invest in a foreign location, has business interest in a foreign location and wants to open up there. For example, Baker McKenzie expanded their office here [Northern Ireland] to 150 people." David explained how WAVTEQ deliver successful campaigns for clients around the world, pointing out that their 16 offices around the world are all strategic locations. This means WAVTEQ can meet with clients easily and deliver their FDI services more easily. "We're the leading provider in FDI products, we have a multitude of different products focused around FDI. One of our biggest products would be the incentives monitor as this allows companies to see what incentive packages are being awarded across the globe. They're able to compare different incentives from different regions. "We also have FDI accounting software and are also rolling out a CRM tool for investment promotion agencies. "We created a new tool after the aftermath of Brexit. We created a new tool called UK investment monitor, which tracks where UK companies are expanding domestically. This helps Government agencies and local enterprise partnerships within the UK to see which domestic companies are investing and in which regions." He also outlined some tips and tricks for future marketers and for marketing in 2019. "Any tips I would give to online marketers to succeed would be to be realistic and to set goals and objectives. I think you need to look at throughout the year, are there any big events happening?  You can then tailor your marketing efforts around these, make SMART objectives and plan effectively." To discover much more about these subjects see our full video interview. WAVTEQ - https://www.wavteq.com/ ProfileTree - https://www.profiletree.com/ --- Summary: What is Foreign Direct Investment? |Talking Economic Development with David Gray |Marketing Services Our WAVTEQ video interview explores global business essentials including job creation, economic development and economic growth, types of foreign direct investment and much more. --- See also: https://youtu.be/m3V9TzDoldg https://youtu.be/qcIpuiSYWfI https://youtu.be/Vt9e-ZrgmiE https://youtu.be/At3T3epTfcY https://youtu.be/g6mDr1VTKMo https://youtu.be/NVOP9Raro-g https://youtu.be/FvVCFurohgs https://youtu.be/LZyTOU_4EAs https://youtu.be/XjwgxGGqjB0 https://youtu.be/5Rf1G-wD4v8
Views: 2975 ProfileTree
L2C Conference - Foreign direct investment: are there spillovers? 1/3
 
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Johansein Rutaihwa: FDI Spillovers in Tanzania's Manufacturing Sector L2C - Learning to Compete: Industrial Development and Policy in Africa The conference builds on the research from the collaborative project between UNU-WIDER, the Brookings Institution and the African Development Bank, and aims to bring together research on industrial development and industrial policy in Africa. More about UNU-WIDER: http://www.wider.unu.edu More about the conference: http://www.wider.unu.edu/l2c
Views: 479 UNU-WIDER
The 15th Industrialists’ Conference‏ - “Foreign Direct Investment in GCC and its Impact on Industry”
 
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Sixth Session: “Foreign Investments in the Industrial Sector and its Role in knowledge development and technology transfer” Session Topics: •Industrial sectors drawing FDIs in GCC countries · The importance of foreign investments in developing and transferring technology in GCC countries · Global success stories: drawing foreign investments in the area of conventional industries and knowledge-based industries Session Chairman: · Dr. Hasan M. Qabazard, Chief Executive Officer, Kuwait Catalyst Company (KSC) – Kuwait Speakers: · Mr. Mohammad Husain, Chief Executive Officer, EQUATE Petrochemical Company – Kuwait · Dr. Bader Othman Malallah, Director General, Arab Planning Institute – Kuwait Panelists: · Mr. Ahmed Al-Tab Tabai, Chairman, Vendors & Contractors Evaluation Committee at Kuwait National Petroleum Company (KNPC) – Kuwait · Mr. Khaled Al Hashash, President, National Project to Map, Measure and Localize the Knowledge Productivity in Public Institutions – Kuwait
Views: 76 GOICqatar
$10-billionjet deal might came with technology transfer
 
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India’s $10-billion single-engine fighter jet deal is believed to have hit a stumbling block over the contentious issue of transfer of technology (ToT) and equity participation. This is while negotiations are on for the purchase of more Rafale jets from France. The two main contenders for the deal — Lockheed Martin and SAAB — have made it clear to the Defence Ministry that they will not go in for a complete transfer of technology (ToT) with 49 per cent equity participation in the joint ventures that they have inked with their respective Indian partners, sources told BusinessLine. Under the defence foreign direct investment rules, global OEMs can invest more than 49 per cent with prior government approval. However, the fighter-jet deal has to be executed under the new ‘Strategic Partnership’ (SP) policy, and as per the norms laid out in this policy, it is the Indian entity that will have a controlling stake with 51 per cent. The Defence Ministry is looking to acquire at least 100 of these jets for the Indian Air Force (IAF). While the US’ Lockheed Martin has offered the advanced F-16 Block 70, Swedish defence major SAAB has presented its single-engine multi-role Gripen E for the programme. Lockheed Martin and SAAB have also joined hands with Tata Advance Defence Systems Ltd and the Adani Group, respectively, to design, develop and produce the warplanes in India under the ‘Make in India’ programme. The issue of proprietary technology was also raised by US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson during his visit last month. He made it clear that ToT will come for a price. The government is now looking at a follow-on order to buy more Rafale jets, which will be in addition to the 36 bought in September last year for $8.9 billion. The IAF is also keen on buying more of these warplanes, according to sources. The decision to buy more Rafale jets from Dassault Aviation is likely to be announced during the visit of French President Emmanuel Macron in December, sources added. However, the sources said, India has already informed the French that “not a single” Rafale will be bought in flyaway mode — they will be built in the Dhirubhai Ambani Aerospace Park, run by Reliance Aerospace Ltd and Dassault Aviation in the Mihan Special Economic Zone in Nagpur. Dassault Aviation Chief Eric Trappier had recently said, in France, that the company is in talks with India for more orders.
Views: 4041 Defence Tube
TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER - OBSTACLES & PREPARATION FOR FREE FLOW IN HINDI I BBA/MBA/Bcom I ppt
 
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#YouTubeTaughtMe INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (IBM) This video consists of the following: 1. Concept of Technology Transfer in hindi 2. Ways of transfer of technology ( point to point and diffusion ) 3. Obstacles in transfer of technology i. Cost ii. Appropriateness iii. Dependence iv. Obsolescence / Outdated technology 4. Preparation for free flow of technology transfer Check out my BLOG : http://www.pptwalablog.blogspot.com Reference books for International business management: 1. https://amzn.to/2qVD2ym - International Business Management by CB Gupta 2. https://amzn.to/2Hpxnea - International Business Management by N. Venkateswaran (Author) 3. https://amzn.to/2HoLgsV - International Business: Text and Cases by Cherunilam .F (Author) TAGS FOR VIDEO: technology transfer technology transfer process technology transfer ppt technology transfer agreement technology transfer examples meaning of technology transfer concept of technology transfer obstacles in technology transfer in hindi preparation for free flow of technology in hindi international business management technology transfer point to point transfer of technology diffusion of technology technology in hindi technology meaning in hindi technology hindi meaning technology in hindi meaning bba 6th sem IBM
Views: 3214 Sonu Singh - PPT wale
Foreign Direct Investment
 
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Does Foreign Direct Investment promote or lower economic growth in a developing country?-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 52 Patricia Silvestre
L2C Conference - Foreign direct investment: are there spillovers? 3/3
 
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Francesco Prota: Which Domestic Firms Benefit from FDI? Evidence from Selected African Countries L2C - Learning to Compete: Industrial Development and Policy in Africa The conference builds on the research from the collaborative project between UNU-WIDER, the Brookings Institution and the African Development Bank, and aims to bring together research on industrial development and industrial policy in Africa. More about UNU-WIDER: http://www.wider.unu.edu More about the conference: http://www.wider.unu.edu/l2c
Views: 165 UNU-WIDER
FDI in defence and transfer of technology is harmfull...
 
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How FDI and transfer of technology will be harmfull for the country.support us on facebook RIGHT TO RECALL AGAINST CURRUPTION..
Views: 37 NITISH KUMAR
AIM 2018 - Global Leaders Debate - Driving Sustainable Development through FDI
 
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Unlike portfolio investment, foreign direct investment (FDI) by its nature constitutes a long term commitment of investors to a country. It enables domestic capital formation, creates jobs and promotes technology- as well as skills transfer. In 2017 global FDI stood at US$ 1.5 trillion, which was 16 % lower than in 2016. However, the decline was mainly felt in the US and Europe an emerging economies received roughly the same amounts as in previous years. From a country perspective, it is important that FDI supports fair competition, greater equality and sustainability. The Global Leaders’ Debate (GLD) explored how FDI can be used to drive sustainable development. The session highlighted how FDI could help create positive North-South as well as South-South economic linkages. It also looked at how the regulatory environment of the recipient country could ensure that the capital deployed serves the sustainable development goals and fosters equality and environmental sustainability.
India Open To 100% FDI In Defence With Full Tech Transfer, Says Defence Official
 
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India Open To 100% FDI In Defence With Full Tech Transfer, Says Defence Official. India is open to 100 per cent foreign direct investment (FDI) in defence if firms are willing to provide full technology transfer, a top Indian defence official has said India and the US are set to enter a critical phase of co-development and co-production. India’s Secretary of Defence Production, Ashok Gupta, said this during an interaction with US corporate sector here last week that was organised by US India Strategic Partnership Forum (USISPF) and attended among others by representatives from Boeing, Lockheed Martin, BAE systems, Honeywell and AECOM. Sharing the contours of the US-India defence partnership, Gupta said, “The government of India would be open to consider 100 per cent FDI in defence, should the company be willing to provide full technology transfer,” according to a media release issued by USISPF. During the discussion, representatives of industry raised concerns, such as trade-offs between the L1 model (lowest price) versus technology transfer and, overall best value and the capability that India was looking to buy and develop. Executives from the US defence industry also complimented India on the progress that has been made under the ‘Make in India’ campaign, the statement said. Mukesh Aghi, president of USISPF, spoke about the importance of dialogues where both sides can have a frank exchange, adding that, “collaboration between India and the US on defence and technology transfer are critical.” In his presentation, Gupta outlined the criteria by which US original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) can participate in the Indian defence market. He also discussed the standards that the government will use for the selection of the OEMs. In addition, he spoke about the role that Indian public sector units (PSUs) in the defense industry will play in the ‘Make in India’ programme. defence news, essay on make in india, india fighter jets, indian air force, indian air force planes, indian fighter, indian fighter jet, indian fighter planes, indian navy submarines, indian submarines, ins arihant, make in india, make in india campaign, make in india essay, make in india in hindi, make in india policy, make in india project, make in india website, making india, mig 29k, teja, tejas, tejas aircraft ====================================================================================================== DISCLAIMER: Each and every content used in this video is not imaginary. All are taken from reputed news agencies. This video doesn’t meant to hurt anybody's personal feelings,beliefs and religion. We are not responsible for any of these statements used in this video. If you have any suggestion or query regarding this video, you can contact me on YouTube personal Message and you can send me message in my Facebook page. Thank you & regards Global conflicts ====================================================================================================== Channel Link: https://www.youtube.com/c/Globalconflict7 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GlobalConflict7/ Fan Page: https://www.facebook.com/globalconflict/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gl0balC0nflict ======================================================================================================
Views: 1109 Global Conflict
What Is Horizontal Foreign Direct Investment?
 
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In countries with tariffs or other barriers to imports, definition of horizontal foreign direct investment by a firm establish manufacturing facilities in multiple producing dec 4, 2010 fdi is the same industry abroad as that which operates at home, but why should choose rather than multinational and kieran macinerney may term paper (advanced seminar) economics international economic alexander protsenko; Vertical investments transition jan 26, 2004 downloadable! no abstract available for this item acronym. Hfdi, horizontal foreign direct investment. Hfdi, hands four dancers of ithaca (estithaca, ny) abstract. This paper explores the horizontal and vertical technology spillover effect of foreign direct investment (fdi) across indian manufacturing industries. Horizontal foreign direct investments and their investment wikipedia. Foreign direct investments in transition countries. A horizontal direct investment refers to the investor by a firm in foreign interest that equals amount company invests domestically same fdi is distinguished from portfolio (the purchase of one country's where carries out activities abroad as at vertical versus. Platform this paper examines the impact of uncertainty on profitability vertical and horizontal foreign direct investment (fdi). Investopedia investopedia video play foreign direct investment ''jul 24, 2014 fdis can also be classified into horizontal and vertical forms. Doctor oeconomiae publicae (dr abstract. A company investing in the same foreign direct investment (fdi) investopedia terms f fdi. The basic goal of this paper is to indicate the importance and influence horizontal foreign direct investments on countries that receive a investment (fdi) an in form controlling ownership fdi arises when firm duplicates its home country based activities at same value chain stage host through. Vertical and horizontal foreign direct investments in citeseerx. Publish econpapers vertical and horizontal foreign direct investments in transition investment how is technology spillover of. Vertical versus horizontal fdi tamu. Googleusercontent searchforeign direct investments are commonly categorized as being horizontal, vertical or conglomerate in nature. Vertical fdi takes place when the answer horizontal refers to type of direct investment between vertical fdi, by contrast, occurs a firm in an industrialized country lowers cost case company does all same activities abroad as at home. For example, toyota assembles motor cars in japan and the this may be done to supply goods or services a foreign market. Inaugural dissertation zur erlangung des grades. What is horizontal foreign direct investment international business fdi. Horizontal fdi, where multi plant firms duplicate roughly the same activities in multiple countries, has been distinguished from vertical and horizontal. Foreign direct investment video foreign. Asp url? Q webcache. What is horizontal foreign direct investment? Definition and meaning investment definition f
Views: 1531 Sityui Spun
The 15th Industrialists’ Conference‏ - “Foreign Direct Investment in GCC and its Impact on Industry”
 
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Sixth Session: “Foreign Investments in the Industrial Sector and its Role in knowledge development and technology transfer” Session Topics: •Industrial sectors drawing FDIs in GCC countries · The importance of foreign investments in developing and transferring technology in GCC countries · Global success stories: drawing foreign investments in the area of conventional industries and knowledge-based industries Session Chairman: · Dr. Hasan M. Qabazard, Chief Executive Officer, Kuwait Catalyst Company (KSC) – Kuwait Speakers: · Mr. Mohammad Husain, Chief Executive Officer, EQUATE Petrochemical Company – Kuwait · Dr. Bader Othman Malallah, Director General, Arab Planning Institute – Kuwait Panelists: · Mr. Ahmed Al-Tab Tabai, Chairman, Vendors & Contractors Evaluation Committee at Kuwait National Petroleum Company (KNPC) – Kuwait · Mr. Khaled Al Hashash, President, National Project to Map, Measure and Localize the Knowledge Productivity in Public Institutions – Kuwait
Views: 23 GOICqatar
Foreign Direct Investment Unit:  Disadvantages of Foreign Direct Investment
 
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Your IB Economics Course Companion! This is video 3 of 3 videos in “The Foreign Direct Investment Series”. Watch the entire series right here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNI2Up0JUWkFQEU8Vtq5gijMaI3GSazVI The List! Here is the “The List” for “The Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Development Series” For an explanation of the logic of “The Lists” click here: https://youtu.be/dE0fbsgXlFE Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Reasons why MNCs are attracted to developing nations 1. Natural resources 2. Huge markets 3. Low cost of labor 4. Fewer regulations Possible advantages of FDI 1. Increased savings 2. Increased employment 3. Increased education and training 4. Increased research, development, technology and marketing strategies 5. Multiplier effect of increased incomes 6. Increased tax revenue 7. Increased foreign capital 8. Improved infrastructure 9. Increased choice in market place 10. Lower prices in market place 11. Increased free trade Possible disadvantages of FDI 1. MNCs Bring own management teams 2. Too much power to MNCs 3. Practice of transfer pricing 4. Increased pollution due to low regulations 5. MNCs Extract natural resources from host country 6. MNCs use capital intensive production methods 7. MNCs purchase domestic firms 8. MNCs often repatriate profits I hope you find these videos helpful to your study of Economics. Enjoy! Brad Cartwright . Follow on Twitter: IB Specific News and Analysis Daily! https://twitter.com/econ_ib . Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/econcoursecompanion/ Support Econ Course Companion: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=CQS377QG4VM4G&source=url
Views: 14748 Econ Course Companion
The 15th Industrialists’ Conference‏ - “Foreign Direct Investment in GCC and its Impact on Industry”
 
24:08
Sixth Session: “Foreign Investments in the Industrial Sector and its Role in knowledge development and technology transfer” Session Topics: •Industrial sectors drawing FDIs in GCC countries · The importance of foreign investments in developing and transferring technology in GCC countries · Global success stories: drawing foreign investments in the area of conventional industries and knowledge-based industries Session Chairman: · Dr. Hasan M. Qabazard, Chief Executive Officer, Kuwait Catalyst Company (KSC) – Kuwait Speakers: · Mr. Mohammad Husain, Chief Executive Officer, EQUATE Petrochemical Company – Kuwait · Dr. Bader Othman Malallah, Director General, Arab Planning Institute – Kuwait Panelists: · Mr. Ahmed Al-Tab Tabai, Chairman, Vendors & Contractors Evaluation Committee at Kuwait National Petroleum Company (KNPC) – Kuwait · Mr. Khaled Al Hashash, President, National Project to Map, Measure and Localize the Knowledge Productivity in Public Institutions – Kuwait
Views: 22 GOICqatar
The 15th Industrialists’ Conference‏ - “Foreign Direct Investment in GCC and its Impact on Industry”
 
24:08
Sixth Session: “Foreign Investments in the Industrial Sector and its Role in knowledge development and technology transfer” Session Topics: •Industrial sectors drawing FDIs in GCC countries · The importance of foreign investments in developing and transferring technology in GCC countries · Global success stories: drawing foreign investments in the area of conventional industries and knowledge-based industries Session Chairman: · Dr. Hasan M. Qabazard, Chief Executive Officer, Kuwait Catalyst Company (KSC) – Kuwait Speakers: · Mr. Mohammad Husain, Chief Executive Officer, EQUATE Petrochemical Company – Kuwait · Dr. Bader Othman Malallah, Director General, Arab Planning Institute – Kuwait Panelists: · Mr. Ahmed Al-Tab Tabai, Chairman, Vendors & Contractors Evaluation Committee at Kuwait National Petroleum Company (KNPC) – Kuwait · Mr. Khaled Al Hashash, President, National Project to Map, Measure and Localize the Knowledge Productivity in Public Institutions – Kuwait
Views: 28 GOICqatar
China's Foreign Investment Law: A strong message of opening-up
 
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As the new Foreign Investment Law has been a highlight during the ongoing annual session of the National People's Congress, how would the law affect foreign investment in China? Will this law address the issue of the alleged forced technology transfer? Is it a method to alleviate Sino-U.S. trade tensions? Subscribe to us on YouTube: https://goo.gl/lP12gA Download our APP on Apple Store (iOS): https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cctvnews-app/id922456579?l=zh&ls=1&mt=8 Download our APP on Google Play (Android): https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.imib.cctv Follow us on: Website: https://www.cgtn.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChinaGlobalTVNetwork/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cgtn/?hl=zh-cn Twitter: https://twitter.com/CGTNOfficial Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/CGTNOfficial/ Tumblr: http://cctvnews.tumblr.com/ Weibo: http://weibo.com/cctvnewsbeijing Tiktok: https://m.tiktok.com/h5/share/usr/6593878228716666886.html?u_code=d1kab7mki4ai6e&utm_campaign=client_share&app=musically&utm_medium=ios&user_id=6593878228716666886&tt_from=copy&utm_source=copy Douyin: https://www.youtube.com/redirect?q=http%3A%2F%2Fv.douyin.com%2F8QTXhV%2F&redir_token=WkBScl40kZbx7ZwJ9M7QhhTjErx8MTU0NTcyMTg3N0AxNTQ1NjM1NDc3&event=channel_description
Views: 342 CGTN
The 15th Industrialists’ Conference‏ - “Foreign Direct Investment in GCC and its Impact on Industry”
 
04:14
Sixth Session: “Foreign Investments in the Industrial Sector and its Role in knowledge development and technology transfer” Session Topics: •Industrial sectors drawing FDIs in GCC countries · The importance of foreign investments in developing and transferring technology in GCC countries · Global success stories: drawing foreign investments in the area of conventional industries and knowledge-based industries Session Chairman: · Dr. Hasan M. Qabazard, Chief Executive Officer, Kuwait Catalyst Company (KSC) – Kuwait Speakers: · Mr. Mohammad Husain, Chief Executive Officer, EQUATE Petrochemical Company – Kuwait · Dr. Bader Othman Malallah, Director General, Arab Planning Institute – Kuwait Panelists: · Mr. Ahmed Al-Tab Tabai, Chairman, Vendors & Contractors Evaluation Committee at Kuwait National Petroleum Company (KNPC) – Kuwait · Mr. Khaled Al Hashash, President, National Project to Map, Measure and Localize the Knowledge Productivity in Public Institutions – Kuwait
Views: 11 GOICqatar
Foreign Direct Investment and its Roles in Economic Development
 
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'Foreign Direct Investment and its Roles in Economic Development' A documentary video produced by a group of 7 students from Faculty of Social Sciences of University Malaysia Sarawak(UNIMAS) in fulfillment of course assessment for 2015/16 2nd semester.
Views: 20355 Koh WEI JIE
Foreign Direct Investment Definition | Definition of Foreign Direct Investment
 
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Foreign Direct Investment Definition | Definition of Foreign Direct Investment: hedge foreign direct investment ; definition of foreign direct investment; meaning of foreign direct investment: A foreign direct investment (FDI) is an investment in the form of a controlling ownership in a business in one country by an entity based in another country. It is thus distinguished from foreign portfolio investment by a notion of direct control. The origin of the investment does not impact the definition as an FDI: the investment may be made either "inorganically" by buying a company in the target country or "organically" by expanding operations of an existing business in that country. Definition: Broadly, foreign direct investment includes "mergers and acquisitions, building new facilities, reinvesting profits earned from overseas operations and intra company loans". In a narrow sense, foreign direct investment refers just to building new facility, a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. FDI is the sum of equity capital, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown the balance of payments. FDI usually involves participation in management, joint-venture, transfer of technology and expertise. Stock of FDI is the net (i.e., outward FDI minus inward FDI) cumulative FDI for any given period. Direct investment excludes investment through purchase of shares. FDI is one example of international factor movements. A foreign direct investment (FDI) is a controlling ownership in a business enterprise in one country by an entity based in another country. Foreign direct investment is distinguished from foreign portfolio investment, a passive investment in the securities of another country such as public stocks and bonds, by the element of "control". According to the Financial Times, "Standard definitions of control use the internationally agreed 10 percent threshold of voting shares, but this is a grey area as often a smaller block of shares will give control in widely held companies. Moreover, control of technology, management, even crucial inputs can confer de facto control." According to Grazia Ietto-Gillies (2012), prior to Stephen Hymer’s theory regarding direct investment in the 1960s, the reasons behind Foreign Direct Investment and Multinational Corporations were explained by neoclassical economics based on macro economic principles. These theories were based on the classical theory of trade in which the motive behind trade was a result of the difference in the costs of production of goods between two countries, focusing on the low cost of production as a motive for a firm’s foreign activity. For example, Joe S. Bain only explained the internationalization challenge through three main principles: absolute cost advantages, product differentiation advantages and economies of scale. Furthermore, the neoclassical theories were created under the assumption of the existence of perfect competition. Intrigued by the motivations behind large foreign investments made by corporations from the United States of America, Hymer developed a framework that went beyond the existing theories, explaining why this phenomenon occurred, since he considered that the previously mentioned theories could not explain foreign investment and its motivations. ............................................................................. Sources: Background Music: Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans The Lounge: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/jazz Images: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com
Views: 541 Free Audio Books
13 Difference Between Fdi And Fii
 
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1. When a foreign individual or institution do invest in our physical properties, like,electricity,drinking water,road,factory etc then this type of investment will be known as FDI. 2. FII is an investment made by an investor in the markets of a foreign nation. 3. Entry and Exit: FDI: Difficult Fii: Easy 4. FDI brings long term capital. FII brings long term capital as well as short term capital. 5. In foreign direct investment, transfer of technologies, funds, strategies or resources is done. In FII, only funds are transferred through this institution. 6. FDI investments are more stable. 7. Foreign Direct Investment targets a specific enterprise. The FII increasing capital availability in general. 8. Economic Growth FDI: Yes FII: No 9. FDI helps in developing infrastructure, increasing job opportunities and also plays a key role in the economic development of the country. FII does not play any role in the economic development of the country. 10. Foreign direct investment does not give an easy way in making money quickly as it includes complex procedures. FII allows the investor to make money quickly from the stock market. 11. FDI examples are AMAZON, Walmart, FII examples are Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs. 12. Control over a company: FDI: Yes Fii: No 13. Fdi: Increase in country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Fii: Increase in capital of the country.
Views: 875 Patel Vidhu
Defence Ministry Sees ‘Conflict Of Interest’ In French Firm DCNS’ 100% FDI Proposal
 
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This video shows you that Defence Ministry Sees ‘Conflict Of Interest’ In French Firm DCNS’ 100% FDI Proposal. The Ministry of Defence sees a “conflict of interest” in the 100 per cent foreign direct investment (FDI) proposal of French firm DCNS even as the company plans to bring in foreign equity into the country for introducing new submarine technology and establish a fully-owned subsidiary. Under the proposal, which had been deferred by the Foreign Investment Promotion Board, DCNS said it plans to develop a technology used for submarines – Air Independent Propulsion or AIP – that enables them to stay underwater for a longer period without coming out for charging batteries. ‘Not new tech’ However, according to highly placed sources in the Defence Ministry, the government does not consider AIP to be a new technology. This is because, officials said, the company is already using this technology in collaboration with Defence Research Development Organisation (DRDO) in developing the Scorpene-class submarines with Mazagon Dock Ltd (MDL). “The FDI policy in defence clearly states that 100 per cent will be allowed only when a firm is bringing in modern technology — something that has not been used before. This is already been developed with DRDO. There is a clear conflict of interest here,” a top Defence Ministry official told BuisnessLine, requesting anonymity. The FIPB has already deferred the proposal in June, asking the company to furnish more details on the technology. But the Ministry seems to have applied its brakes on the proposal, saying that this is not a new technology. The DRDO-developed AIP will be fitted into the last two of the six Scorpene P-75 submarines being built under technology transfer at MDL for the Indian Navy. drdo, fdi, dcns, p-75, project 75, 100 % fdi, scorpene-class submarines, direct investment, fdi policy, fdi international, foreign investment, foreign direct investment fdi, fdi investment, drdo tenders, foreign development investment, foreign direct investors, aip publishing, fdi company Channel Link: youtube.com/c/Globalconflict7
Views: 1652 Global Conflict
Mod. 4 - Lec. 11 - Overview on FDI in developing countries
 
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I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)
Views: 319 Papa CISS
Just Rs 1.1-cr defence FDI in 3 yrs
 
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The government has also put in place a Security Manual for Licensed Defence Industries. The security manual prescribes guidelines on physical, information, documentation, cyber and personnel security aspects. The FDI in defence policy has been reviewed with an aim to promote investment and technology transfer in defence manufacturing sector. This sector needs significant capital investment and infusion of technology for which foreign investment can play a critical role. The FDI in the sector could be the most trusted route to technology transfer, which would help in increasing the defence production base and providing the much-needed impetus to self reliance and indigenisation in the defence sector, the MoD has accepted in Parliament. =================================================== DISCLAIMER: Information, Facts or Opinion expressed in this Video are Presented as Sources and do not reflects views of INDIA TUBE and hence INDIA TUBE is not liable or responsible for the same. The Sources are responsible for accuracy, Completeness, suitaibility and Validity of any information in this Documentary. Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/indiatubedesk Twitter ► https://twitter.com/indiatubedesk ˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍˍ SOURCE► http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/nation/just-rs-1-1-cr-defence-fdi-in-3-yrs/445813.html ==================================================== THANKS FOR WATCHING, PLEASE LIKE SHARE AND SUBSCRIBE TO THE INDIA TUBE ====================================================
Views: 4102 India Tube Defence
What Is Foreign Investment
 
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What Is Foreign Investment,https://goo.gl/r1938O foreign direct investment (FDI) is a controlling ownership in a business enterprise in one country by an entity based in another country Foreign direct investment is distinguished from portfolio foreign investment, a passive investment in the securities of another country such as public stocks and bonds, by the element of "control".[1] According to the Financial Times, "Standard definitions of control use the internationally agreed 10 percent threshold of voting shares, but this is a grey area as often a smaller block of shares will give control in widely held companies. Moreover, control of technology, management, even crucial inputs can confer de facto control. Definitions Broadly, foreign direct investment includes "mergers and acquisitions, building new facilities, reinvesting profits earned from overseas operations and intra company loans". In a narrow sense, foreign direct investment refers just to building new facilities. The numerical FDI figures based on varied definitions are not easily comparable. As a part of the national accounts of a country, and in regard to the GDP equation Y=C+I+G+(X-M)[Consumption + gross Investment + Government spending +(exports - imports)], where I is domestic investment plus foreign investment, FDI is defined as the net inflows of investment (inflow minus outflow) to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor.[2] FDI is the sum of equity capital, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown the balance of payments. FDI usually involves participation in management, joint-venture, transfer of technology and expertise. Stock of FDI is the net (i.e., inward FDI minus outward FDI) cumulative FDI for any given period. Direct investment excludes investment through purchase of shares.[3] FDI is one example of international factor movements A foreign direct investment (FDI) is a controlling ownership in a business enterprise in one country by an entity based in another country. Foreign direct investment is distinguished from portfolio foreign investment, a passive investment in the securities of another country such as public stocks and bonds, by the element of "control".[1] According to the Financial Times, "Standard definitions of control use the internationally agreed 10 percent threshold of voting shares, but this is a grey area as often a smaller block of shares will give control in widely held companies. Moreover, control of technology, management, even crucial inputs can confer de facto control." Theoretical background According to Grazia Ietto-Gillies (2012),prior to Stephen Hymer’s theory regarding direct investment in the 1960s, the reasons behind Foreign Direct Investment and Multinational Corporations were explained by neoclassical economics based on macro economic principles. These theories were based on the classical theory of trade in which the motive behind trade was a result of the difference in the costs of production of goods between two countries, focusing on the low cost of production as a motive for a firm’s foreign activity. For example, Joe S. Bain only explained the internationalization challenge through three main principles: absolute cost advantages, product differentiation advantages and economies of scale. Furthermore, the neoclassical theories were created under the assumption of the existence of perfect competition. Intrigued by the motivations behind large foreign investments made by corporations from the United States of America, Hymer developed a framework that went beyond the existing theories, explaining why this phenomenon occurred, since he considered that the previously mentioned theories could not explain foreign investment and its motivations. Facing the challenges of his predecessors, Hymer focused his theory on filling the gaps regarding international investment. The theory proposed by the author approaches international investment from a different and more firm-specific point of view. As opposed to traditional macroeconomics-based theories of investment, Hymer states that there is a difference between mere capital investment, otherwise known as portfolio investment, and direct investment. The difference between the two, which will become the cornerstone of his whole theoretical framework, is the issue of control, meaning that with direct investment firms are able to obtain a greater level of control than with portfolio investment. Furthermore, Hymer proceeds to criticize the neoclassical theories, stating that the theory of capital movements cannot explain international production. Moreover, he clarifies that FDI is not necessarily a movement of funds from a home country to a host country, and that it is concentrated on particular industries within many countries. In https://goo.gl/r1938O
Views: 364 Tips digital1
Sub Saharan Africa faces FDI paradox
 
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Sub Saharan Africa is facing a Foreign Direct Investment paradox as a region attracting the lowest share of global net FDI yet offering the highest rate of return. So says a leading United Nations economist who has penned an article aimed at addressing this contradiction. Sub Saharan Africa attracted just 1.87% of global FDI between 2010 and 2016 with a view emerging that as a percentage that number should be above 10% at a minimum. For more news, visit: sabcnews.com
Views: 217 SABC Digital News
Open Research Seminar (Vadym Volosovych): Identifying Knowledge Spillovers and Competition Effects
 
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Вадим Волосович, Foreign Investment and Domestic Productivity: Identifying Knowledge Spillovers and Competition Effects
Marc Beauchamp, TDC/CCC lecture "FDI: An Economic Game Changer"
 
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Marc Beauchamp, VP at CAI Global, lectures on foreign direct investment at the global and local level.
Views: 1023 Mountain Lake PBS
International Investment: Stock Market Analysis - Investors Conference - Part 2 (1988)
 
02:04:18
Foreign direct investment (FDI) is a direct investment into production or business in a country by an individual or company of another country, either by buying a company in the target country or by expanding operations of an existing business in that country. Foreign direct investment is in contrast to portfolio investment which is a passive investment in the securities of another country such as stocks and bonds. Broadly, foreign direct investment includes "mergers and acquisitions, building new facilities, reinvesting profits earned from overseas operations and intra company loans".[1] In a narrow sense, foreign direct investment refers just to building new facilities. The numerical FDI figures based on varied definitions are not easily comparable. As a part of the national accounts of a country, and in regard to the GDP equation Y=C+I+G+(X-M)[Consumption + gross Investment + Government spending +(eXports - iMports], where I is domestic investment plus foreign investment, FDI is defined as the net inflows of investment (inflow minus outflow) to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor.[2] FDI is the sum of equity capital, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown the balance of payments. FDI usually involves participation in management, joint-venture, transfer of technology and expertise. There are two types of FDI: inward and outward, resulting in a net FDI inflow (positive or negative) and "stock of foreign direct investment", which is the cumulative number for a given period. Direct investment excludes investment through purchase of shares.[3] FDI is one example of international factor movements Horizontal FDI arises when a firm duplicates its home country-based activities at the same value chain stage in a host country through FDI.[4] Platform FDI Foreign direct investment from a source country into a destination country for the purpose of exporting to a third country. Vertical FDI takes place when a firm through FDI moves upstream or downstream in different value chains i.e., when firms perform value-adding activities stage by stage in a vertical fashion in a host country.[4] Horizontal FDI decreases international trade as the product of them is usually aimed at host country; the two other types generally act as a stimulus for it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_investment
Views: 1518 The Film Archives
Drop in foreign direct investment in Korea has produced major job losses
 
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한국 외국인 투자 부진으로 연간 일자리 13만개 손실 A decline in foreign direct investment in Korea has caused the country to lose thousands of jobs every year. Shin Se-min explains more about why the jobs are disappearing and what can be done to get them back. Korea is losing 130-thousand jobs every year as a direct result of falling foreign direct investment in the country. In its latest report, the Korea Economic Research Institute says cumulative job losses due to this factor stands at 927-thousand since 2001. Over the past 13 years... up to 2014,... that′s an annual average of 71-thousand jobs Korea could have,... but isn′t getting. And it′s a vicious cycle. Fewer jobs means lower production. Figures show tumbling FDI has cost Korea one-hundred-22 billion U.S. dollars since 2001. So,.. the average loss in production per year between 2001 and 2014 was nearly nine-and-a-half billion dollars. Making matters worse is Korea′s already tepid employment market,... which is hampering government efforts to attain economic growth of three percent this year. But,... according to the report,... the worrying fall in production is mostly down to slumping foreign direct investment. Inbound foreign capital has been contracting since the early 2000s. FDI in Korea is less than half the amount Korean firms invest outside of Korea. Korea′s industry ministry says FDI in Korea amounted to some 13-billion U.S. dollars in the first three quarters of this year,… down ten-and-a-half percent on year. Foreign investment in Korea topped 15 billion dollars in 1999,… but only stood at 14-billion in 2013. Experts say FDI is being held back by Korea′s sluggish investment climate and high business expenses. They advise the government to do more to ensure there′s a better balance between the amount of foreign investment into Korea and the amount Korean firms invest in overseas markets. Shin Se-min, Arirang News. Visit ‘Arirang News’ Official Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/newsarirang
Views: 142 ARIRANG NEWS
The Annual Investment Meeting 2015
 
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For more : http://goo.gl/FtGsf8 The theme of the fifth edition of the Annual Investment 2015 will be focused on "Sustainable Development through FDI Induced Innovation and Technology Transfer". The event will be held from 30 March - 1 April 2015 at the Dubai international Convention and Exhibition Center. It will be the occasion to gather the world's leading academics, experts and practitioners to discuss and debate how essential is innovative activity for growth and development and how FDI can contribute to sustainable economic growth through transfer of technology and the supportive investment policies that are needed to attract and retain investment of the right kind as well as the internationalization of research and development activities by transnational corporations.