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Covalent Bonding | #aumsum
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1432269 It's AumSum Time
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1780493 CrashCourse
Introduction to Ionic Bonding and Covalent Bonding
 
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This crash course chemistry video tutorial explains the main concepts between ionic bonds found in ionic compounds and polar & nonpolar covalent bonding found in molecular compounds. This video contains plenty of notes, examples, and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Ionic Bonds - Transfer of Valence Electrons 2. Electrostatic Force of Attraction In Ionic Bonding 3. Ionic Compounds - Metals and Nonmetals 4. Molecular Compounds - 2 or More Nonmetals 5. Polar Covalent Bonding - Unequal Sharing of Electrons 6. Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Equal Sharing of Electrons 7. Polarized Compounds - Dipole Moment and Charge Separation 8. Electronegativity and Charge Distribution 9. Metal Cations vs Nonmetal Anions
Ionic and covalent bonding animation
 
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Ionic bonding formed when one atom has sufficient strength of attraction to remove ion from the other atom. Covalent bonding occurs when neither atom has sufficient strength to remove the other atom's electron. They would instead share electrons to form stable configurations of electrons.
Views: 1243572 kosasihiskandarsjah
Chemistry: What is a Covalent Bond? (Polar and Nonpolar)
 
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Chemistry: What is a Covalent Bond? (Polar and Nonpolar) Covalent bonds are one of the 3 main types of intramolecular forces, along with ionic bonds and metallic bonds. Covalent bonds are the result of atoms sharing their valence electrons. Covalent bonds can be polar or nonpolar, depending on the electronegativies of the atoms involved in the bond. We show five examples of covalent bonds using Lewis dot structure notation: HF, CO2, H2, H2O and CCl4. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:28 Definition of a Covalent Bond 0:42 Example 1: HF (single covalent bond) 1:23 Example 2: CO2 (double covalent bond) 2:09 Nonpolar covalent bonds 2:20 Example 3: H2 2:43 Polar covalent bonds 2:48 Example 4: H2O 3:58 Example 5: CCl4 4:39 Pauling Bond Polarity Scale (Linus Pauling) 5:15 Do covalent bonds break apart in water? (electrolytes) Click to watch our video about ionic bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Click to see our video about metallic bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ And here's our video comparing ionic and covalent bonds: http://bit.ly/1Nz4Kpy Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Essential Chemistry Lessons help all year long: What is a Mole? Avogadro's Number: http://bit.ly/2laJh0S Molar Mass: http://bit.ly/2pNfg8L Scientific Notation: http://bit.ly/2cv6yTw Significant Figures: http://bit.ly/2b1g3aJ Unit Conversion 1: http://bit.ly/1YGOQgw Unit Conversion 2: http://bit.ly/1RGbwZ1 Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/2gmSWfe ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios.
Views: 183481 Socratica
Covalent vs. Ionic bonds
 
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This quick video explains: 1) How to determine the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons that an atom will comtain. 2) The characteristics of covalent bonds 3) The characteristics of ionic bonds Teachers: You can purchase this PowerPoint from my online store for only $3. The link below will take you to the store. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Covalent-vs-Ionic-Bonds-PowerPoint-2340207 - Atom - Element - Proton - Neutron - Electron - Atomic number - Atomic mass - Covalent - Ionic - O2 - Salt - Sodium chloride
Views: 407544 Beverly Biology
Bonding Models and Lewis Structures: Crash Course Chemistry #24
 
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Models are great, except they're also usually inaccurate. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses why we need models in the world and how we can learn from them... even when they're almost completely wrong. Plus, Lewis Structures! -- Table of Contents Models :06 Linus Pauling & The Bonding Model 9:16 Lewis Dot Structures 4:27 Ionic Bonds 5:30 Covalent Bonds 6:10 Double Bonds 7:17 Triple Bonds 8:14 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1526650 CrashCourse
Covalent Bond
 
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DeltaStep is a social initiative by graduates of IIM-Ahmedabad, IIM-Bangalore, IIT-Kharagpur, ISI-Kolkata, Columbia University (USA), NTU (Singapore) and other leading institutes. At DeltaStep, we understand that just like every child has a unique face, a unique fingerprint; he has a unique learning ability as well. Hence we have built an intelligent adaptive learning system that delivers a tailor-made learning solution and helps a student to learn at his own pace because when it comes to learning, one size does not fit all. Learn from 1000s of such interesting videos, practice from more than 1,00,000 questions, learn complex concepts through games, take timed tests, get detailed reports & in-depth analysis even via SMS and Whatsapp and many more amazing features. Class wise mapping available for all leading boards including ICSE and CBSE. Create your personal learning account. Register for FREE at www.deltastep.com.
Views: 95287 DeltaStep
Ionic Bonding Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
Views: 1071854 Tyler DeWitt
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 732633 Tyler DeWitt
Polar Covalent Bonds and Nonpolar Covalent bonds, Ionic Bonding - Types of Chemical Bonds
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into the types of chemical bonds such as polar covalent bonds, nonpolar covalent bonds and ionic bonds. It discusses the difference between ionic bonding and covalent bonding. Ionic bonds can be identified by looking for a metal combined with a nonmetal. Covalent bonds typically occur among 2 or more nonmetals. Covalent bonding involves a sharing of electrons and ionic bonding forms as a result of a transfer of electrons from the metal to the nonmetal producing ions with opposite charge which are attracted to each other. The electrostatic force of attraction produces the ionic bond that holds the cations and anions together. Polar covalent bonds have unequal sharing of electrons between the atoms where as nonpolar covalent bonding have a relatively equal sharing of electrons between the atoms attached to the bond. Polar covalent bonds typically have an electronegativity difference of 0.5 or more where as nonpolar covalent bonds have a value difference of 0.4 or less. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
What Are Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about covalent bonds, when learning about properties of matter. When similar atoms react, like non-metals combining with other non-metals, they share electrons. This is covalent bonding. Non-metals have shells of electrons that are normally half or more than half full of electrons. Since they have a strong attraction for a few additional electrons, it is energetically unfavourable for any of them to lose electrons, so they share electrons by overlapping orbitals. This makes a bonding orbital, or covalent bond, that contains two or more electrons. Covalent bonds can be represented by a dot and cross diagram. These diagrams show only the valence electrons. Covalent bonds are directional, which means they are in a fixed position. The overlap between orbitals mean that the atoms in covalent bonds are very close, and make covalent bonds strong. There are two kinds of covalent structure - small molecules, like water, and giant compounds, like diamond. The electrons in the bonds are evenly shared, which means the bonds are not polarised; there is little attraction between molecules, and forces between molecules are weak. Compounds made from small covalent molecules have low melting and boiling points and are volatile. They also don’t conduct electricity. Carbon and silicon tend to form giant covalent compounds. These bond in the same way, but instead of forming small molecules with one or two bonds, they form four, make up huge lattices or chains of many many linked up atoms. Diamond is a common example, and is made up of Carbon. These compounds have very high melting and boiling points because you have to break covalent bonds rather than intermolecular forces to make them free enough to act like liquids or gases. The covalent bonds hold them rigidly in place in the giant lattice. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Covalent Bonding of Hydrogen, Oxygen & Nitrogen | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen as a part of the overall topic of properties of matter. The noble gas structure and covalent bonding is also discussed. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Lewis Diagrams Made Easy: How to Draw Lewis Dot Structures
 
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For a limited time get 10% off all my Teespring Merch. Use the promo code: KETZ10 Please consider supporting me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ketzbook This is a Videoscribe tutorial on how to draw Lewis diagrams for elements and simple molecules. Lewis diagrams (aka Lewis structures, Lewis dot structures, Lewis dot diagrams) are useful because they use simple drawings to show how atoms share valence electrons in molecules, polyatomic ions, and other covalent structures. This is my first tutorial in the series. Please also see the second video in my Lewis diagram series: https://youtu.be/qwqXAlvNxsU For simple molecules, follow these 5 steps: 1) count all the valence electrons 2) put the singular atom in the middle 3) draw in single bonds 4) put remaining electrons in as lone pairs 5) give every atom an octet or duet by turning lone pairs into double or triple bonds as needed My goal is to make chemistry easier ;) http://ketzbook.com
Views: 1005636 ketzbook
6.2 Covalent Bonding and Molecular Compounds
 
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6.2 covers the formation and characteristics of covalent bonds and gives tutorials for electron dot and Lewis notation.
Views: 5105 Peer Vids
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2334491 Khan Academy
Lecture on Covalent Electron Counting
 
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Full length lecture introducing covalent electron counting
Views: 2200 CHE2C32
4.2 Describe how the covalent bond is formed via electron sharing [SL IB Chemistry]
 
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Atoms may share electrons to obtain a full outer shell with other atoms. The resulting molecules are more stable. Atoms may share one electron each = covalent bond. Sharing 2 each is a double bond, 3 each is a triple bond. If one atom shares 2 electrons and the other shares none that is called a dative (or coordinate) covalent bond. The hydronium ion, ammonium ion and carbon monoxide all contain a dative covalent bond. Pyro's arm grew back at respawn!
Views: 55296 Richard Thornley
Ionic and Covalent Bonding - Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into ionic and covalent bonding. It explains the difference between polar covalent bonds and nonpolar covalent bonds. Ionic bonds exist between metals and nonmetals and are made up of ions with positive and negative charges. Covalent bonds involve a sharing of electrons where as ionic bonds are created by a transfer of electrons. What Is The Difference Between Atoms, Molecules & Ions? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSJeMJaCkVU Calculating The Number of Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65dDZulPhtg How To Balance Chemical Equations: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUARzSxcKzk
Chemical Bonding Covalent Bonds and Ionic Bonds
 
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Chemical Bonding Covalent Bonds and Ionic Bonds. Mr. Causey discusses ionic bonds, covalent bonds and chemical bonding. You need to know the periodic table, valence electrons, lewis dot symbols, oxidation numbers and electronegativity in order to determine chemicals bonds. http://www.yourCHEMcoach.com Subscribe for more chemistry videos: http://bit.ly/1jeutVl Basic Rules - 0:56 Valence Electrons - 1:10 Electronegativity - 1:18 Chemical Bonding - 1:46 Ionic Bond - 2:58 Covalent Bond - 4:00 Compound Characteristics - 6:26 Name that Bond - 7:50 Thinking Time - 8:57 Share this Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjoQHqgzda8 Resources: Polyatomic Ion Cheat Sheet: http://bit.ly/14e2pbw Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/ptable9 Related Videos: Related Videos: Naming Ionic and Covalent Compounds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XUsOLaz3zY Metallic Bonding: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uNETGK_sb4 Molecular Geometry: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pq2wum1uDc Intermolecular Forces: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYZg1j7o2x4 Contact Me: [email protected] Follow Me: http://www.twitter.com/#!/mrcausey http://pinterest.com/mistercausey/ http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=814523544
Views: 287095 Mr. Causey
How atoms bond - George Zaidan and Charles Morton
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-atoms-bond-george-zaidan-and-charles-morton Atoms can (and do) bond constantly; it's how they form molecules. Sometimes, in an atomic tug-of-war, one atom pulls electrons from another, forming an ionic bond. Atoms can also play nicely and share electrons in a covalent bond. From simple oxygen to complex human chromosome 13, George Zaidan and Charles Morton break down the humble chemical bond. Lesson by George Zaidan and Charles Morton, animation by Bevan Lynch.
Views: 417126 TED-Ed
Covalent Bonding
 
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019 - Covalent Bonding In this video Paul Andersen explains how covalent bonds form between atoms that are sharing electrons. Atoms that have the same electronegativity create nonpolar covalent bonds. The bond energy and bond length can be determined by graphing the potential energy versus the distance between atoms. Atoms that share electrons unequally form nonpolar covalent bonds. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "Electronegativities of the Elements (data Page)." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, August 10, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Electronegativities_of_the_elements_(data_page)&oldid=565034286. "File:Covalent Bond Hydrogen.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Covalent_bond_hydrogen.svg. "File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg. "File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png. "File:Magnesium Crystals.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Magnesium_crystals.jpg. "File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg. "File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png. "File:Oxygen Molecule.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Oxygen_molecule.png. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Sugar 2xmacro.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sugar_2xmacro.jpg.
Views: 197105 Bozeman Science
How to Draw Covalent Bonding Molecules
 
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http://www.sciencetutorial4u.com This video explains how to draw covalent molecules and compounds. Contents: 0:08 Introduction 0:39 H2 1:25 HCl 2:23 Cl2 3:18 CH4 4:27 NH3 5:37 H2O 6:52 O2 7:57 N2 Thank you for watching. Please like, subscribe and share this video: https://youtu.be/_v8C1W0ChVM INTRODUCTION 0:08 Covalent bonding happens between non-metals. The electrons are shared between the non-metal atoms. This bonding allow atoms to have full outer shell of electrons. Only the electrons in the outer shell take part in the bonding. The number of electrons in the outer shell can be found out using the group in the periodic table. H2 0:39 Hydrogen is in group 1 so it has one electron in the outer shell. Hydrogen molecules have single bond which means they have two electrons in the overlap. HCl 1:25 Chlorine is in group 7 so it has seven electrons in the outer shell. HCl has single bond so it has two electrons in the overlap. Cl2 2:23 Chlorine is in group 7 so it has seven electrons in the outer shell. Cl2 (Chlorine molecule) has single bond so it has two electrons in the overlap. CH4 3:18 Carbon is in group 4 so it has four electrons in the outer shell. Methane has four single bonds. NH3 4:27 Nitrogen is found in group 5 so it has 5 electrons in the outer-shell. The Nitrogen atom is surrounded by three Hydrogen atoms, each providing one electron in the sharing (overlap). So Ammonia has 3 single bonds. H2O 5:37 Oxygen is found in group 6 so it has 6 electrons in the outer shell. Water has 2 single bonds. O2 6:52 Oxygen molecules have double bonds. Oxygen atom is found in group 6 so it has 6 electron in the outer shell. Therefore, in the overlap there are 2 pairs of electrons (which is 4 electrons in the overlap). This leads O2 molecules to have one double bond. N2 7:57 Nitrogen molecules have triple bonds. Nitrogen is found in group 5 so it has 5 electrons in the outer-shell. In the overlap, there are 3 pairs of electrons which are 6 electrons in the overlap. This causes Nitrogen molecules to have one triple bond. How to draw Ionic Bonds Teaching Video: https://youtu.be/ek-AN5K3AlI Ionic and Covalent bonds Teaching video: https://youtu.be/wQ3NJUKKcTU How to draw electron shell Teaching video: https://youtu.be/vuVNkQwSggo
Views: 69639 sciencetutorial4u
Chemical Bonding - Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds
 
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This two minute animation describes the Octet Rule and explains the difference between ionic and covalent bonds. Find more free tutorials, videos and readings for the science classroom at ricochetscience.com
Views: 267165 RicochetScience
Covalent Bonding! (Definition and Examples)
 
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Covalent bonding is one of the two main types of bonding. Because it’s about sharing electrons, most of the time atoms involved in covalent bonding will have no charges. FREE Practice Problems! 🍏 http://robinreaction.com LET ME be your online tutor! 🍎 https://www.robinreaction.com/tutoring Need more help? Check out some of my playlists! My Bonding Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4-ljSnCA78&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhxT0RePkb2hibgOw5vZ0CMp My Science Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdYiEKh_P4M&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhyFIgXQOm8dv_dhtgRjFeSn Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRdkQ6SFhQw&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhwMrShxFJrMSulAH8IF1_Ej My Balancing Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9J3LzWGlaQ&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhx6zKa8lEkqTkR8jnCim31i My Mole Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEQNjXAQQg4&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhztE2CmvAVBe34knNYAKiJh My Naming Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4u1DEFPBJk&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhx-HqP7JWvT9knG1jjwqz4D 🍉 Subscribe to my channel! 🍉 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN2sk9BZ-f5GaiTK-fGDByQ?sub_confirmation=1 I'm Robin Reaction! My goal is to help you understand chemistry by breaking down difficult concepts into pieces you can understand. I've taught thousands of students and no matter how much you're struggling, I promise you can learn this stuff if you dedicate yourself to learning it and get help from the right people!
Views: 8720 Robin Reaction
Valence electrons and bonding | Periodic table | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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How to get Lewis structures from electron configuration, and how valence electrons are involved in forming bonds. Created by Jay. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/atomic-radius-trend?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/copy-of-periodic-table-of-elements/v/periodic-table-transition-metals?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 472880 Khan Academy
Types Of Chemical Bonds - What Are Chemical Bonds - Covalent Bonds And Ionic Bonds - What Are Ions
 
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In this video we discuss how chemical bonds are formed, we cover ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Chemical bonding is important in many different functions of the body. Transcript and notes The interactions of 2 or more atoms mainly occur at the outermost shell, or energy level. The result of these interactions results in a chemical reaction. In atoms that have fewer or more than 8 electrons in their outermost energy level, reactions occur that result in the loss, gain, or sharing of electrons with another atom to satisfy the octet rule. The octet rule means that elements tend to combine so that each atom has 8 electrons in its outermost shell. This results in the formation of structures such as crystals or molecules. Two atoms of oxygen can combine with one atom of carbon to form carbon dioxide or CO2. There are two main types of chemical bonds, ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Ionic bonds are bonds where the transfer of electrons takes place. Let’s see how this type of bond works. So, here we have a sodium atom, which has an atomic number of 11, meaning it has 11 protons in its nucleus and 11 electrons in its shells or energy levels. Shell one has 2 electrons, shell 2 has 8 electrons and shell 3 has 1 electron. And here we have a chlorine atom, which has an atomic number of 17, so 17 protons and 17 electrons. It has 2 electrons in shell one, 8 in shell 2 and 7 in shell 3. We know that atoms want to have 8 electrons in their outer shell, so Sodium can give up one electron, and now it has 8 electrons in its outer shell, and chlorine can take that electron from sodium and that will give it 8 electrons in its outer shell. Since the sodium atom gave up an electron it now has 11 protons, which are positively charged, and 10 electrons which are negatively charged. This results in the formation of a sodium ion with a positive charge. An ion is an atom or molecule with a net electrical charge due to the loss or gain of an electron. Since the chlorine atom gained an electron, and now has 17 protons and 18 electrons, it is a chlorine ion with a negative charge. The positively charged sodium ion is now attracted to the negatively charged chlorine ion, and NaCl or table salt is formed. This is an ionic bond. So, ionic bonding is when an electron transfer takes place and generates 2 oppositely charged ions. Now for covalent bonds. Covalent bonds are chemical bonds that are formed by the sharing of one or more pairs of electrons by the outer energy levels or shells of two atoms. The 4 major elements of the body, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen almost always form covalent bonds by sharing electrons. So, for instance, 2 hydrogen atoms can bond by sharing a pair of electrons. Hydrogen is one of the exceptions to the octet rule of having 8 electrons in the outer shell, because it only has one shell. Let’s look at carbon dioxide or co2 again, which form a covalent bond. Oxygen has an atomic mass of 8, so 8 protons, and 8 electrons, 2 in its inner shell and 6 in its outer shell, so, oxygen atoms want 2 more electrons for their outer shell. Carbon has an atomic mass of 6, 6 protons and 6 electrons, 2 in the inner shell and 4 in the outer shell, so it wants 4 more electrons for its outer shell. They can make each other happy by sharing what they have. Oxygen atom number 1 can share 2 of its electrons and the carbon atom can share 2 of its electrons with oxygen atom number one, making oxygen atom number one happy. And oxygen atom number 2 can come in and like oxygen atom number one it can share two of its electrons and the carbon atom has 2 more of its own electrons that it can share with oxygen atom number 2. So now all 3 atoms are happy. By sharing 2 pairs of electrons in this situation a double bond has been formed, and double bonds are important in chemical reactions.
Views: 5476 Whats Up Dude
Ionic and Covalent Bonds Made Easy
 
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Simple explanation of Ionic and Covalent Bonds music from bensound.com sunny day from soundbible.com wind from soundbible.com
Views: 92050 Got Science?
Carbon and its Compounds | Bonding in Carbon | Covalent Bonds
 
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CBSE Class 10 Science - Carbon and its Compounds - What is covalent bonding and why Carbon shares electrons? What are Electrovalent and Covalent compounds and difference between them? Atoms can share, gain or Loose electrons to stable their Octates. So the compounds formed by gain or loss of electrons is called as the electrovalent compound and covalent compounds are formed by sharing of electrons. Carbon has an atomic number of 6 and its electronic configuration will be 2 and 4. So to be stale carbon has to either loss 4 electrons or gain 4 electrons. So the carbon shares the electrons with other atoms. So Covalent bonding is mutual sharing of electrons so as to achieve a stable electronic configuration. Hence carbon has co-valency of 4 and will be tetravalent. About PrepOngo: Best Online Learning App which provides CBSE class 10 interactive video lectures, NCERT solutions, written study material, solved examples, in chapter quizzes and practice problems for Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology) and Mathematics. We try to help the students understand lessons by visualising the concepts through illustrative and interactive videos, practice from large question banks and evaluate and improve yourself continuously. Online Live courses are also offered for CBSE boards, JEE Mains, JEE-Advanced, NEET and Board preparation for class 10, 11 and 12 For all CBSE class 10 Science and Maths video lectures download the Android App: https://goo.gl/HJwkhw Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://goo.gl/KSsWP2
Views: 52594 PrepOnGo
Polar Covalent Bonds
 
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Polar covalent bonds result from eneven sharing of electrons. Learn how to predict if a bond will be polar or nonpolar in this video.
Views: 155989 The Science Classroom
Lewis Dot Structures for Covalent Compounds - Part 1 CLEAR & SIMPLE
 
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Lewis Dot Structures for Covalent Compounds - Part 1 - This awesome video shows how to draw lewis dot structures for covalent compounds. Step by step instruction is provided on how to draw these molecular lewis dot structures. In order to fully understand this video, you'll need to know how to determine the number of valance electrons an element has. You'll find that these molecules also have single, double and triple covalent bonds.Thanks for tuning in. Peace.
Views: 173848 sciencepost
How Covalent Bonds Form
 
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A description of how carbon and hydrogen share electrons to form a covalently bonded compound.
Views: 11852 BioBunn
BONDING IN CARBON THE  COVALENT BOND
 
04:20
For accessing 7Activestudio videos on mobile Download SCIENCETUTS App to Access 120+ hours of Free digital content. For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ Contact: +91- 9700061777, 040-64501777 / 65864777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. Carbon–carbon bond. A carbon–carbon bond is a covalent bond between two carbon atoms. The most common form is the single bond: a bond composed of two electrons, one from each of the two atoms. ... Carbon atoms can also form double bonds in compounds called alkenes or triple bonds in compounds called alkynes.
Views: 10230 7activestudio
Chemistry – Covalent bond, Bond pair and Lone pair  - Chemical Bonding – Part 4 - English
 
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This part 2 of Covalent bond lessons. This videos explains nature of covalent bond ,how covalent bond is formed, structure of molecule which has multiple covalent bonds etc. About us: We are a social enterprise working on a mission to make school learning interesting, relevant and affordable to every child on this planet. You can watch our FREE online videos at http://www.bodhaguru.com/watch and download our practice application/games - just visit http://www.bodhaguru.com/play If you like our videos, subscribe to our channel http://www.youtube.com/user/BodhaGuruLearning. Feel free to connect with us at http://www.facebook.com/BodhaGuru OR http://twitter.com/Bodhaguru Have fun, while you learn. Thanks for watching -- Team BodhaGuru
Views: 10388 Bodhaguru
Covalent Bonding in Water, Methane, Ammonia & Hydrogen Fluoride | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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In this video we will look at covalent bonds in methane, ammonia, water and hydrogen fluoride. They are small, covalently-bonded molecules. The atoms within them share electrons because they have half full or more than half full valence shells of electrons: they are non-metals. Methane is a fuel, ammonia is used in household cleaners, water is a drink and the essence of life, and hydrogen fluoride is used to etch glass. The bonding in methane, ammonia, water and hydrogen fluoride shows a pattern: methane is carbon bonded to four hydrogen atoms; ammonia is nitrogen bonded to three hydrogen atoms; water is oxygen bonded to two hydrogen atoms, and hydrogen fluoride is fluorine bonded to just one hydrogen atom. Carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and fluorine appear in the periodic table in this order, moving along the second row from left to right. Carbon has four out of eight electrons in its outer shell, so makes four covalent bonds. Nitrogen has five out of eight electrons in its outer shell, so can make three covalent bonds to make the shell full. Oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell. It can bond with two hydrogen atoms to share 2 more electrons. It now has a full outer shell of 8 electrons. Ammonia has two electrons, called a lone pair of electrons, occupying the fourth position. These electrons take up space. Because electrons are negatively charged, lone pairs repel bonds even more strongly than bonds repel each other. This makes ammonia less symmetric than methane. The water molecule is bent in shape. Oxygen has two lone pairs. Negatively charged lone pairs are slightly attracted to the hydrogen atoms, so there is a weak attraction between molecules. Forces between molecules are a little stronger in water than in ammonia or methane. Water is liquid at room temperature and pressure, whilst ammonia a gas that is easily liquefied, and methane is a gas. Intermolecular forces are normally very weak in covalent compounds, but in water they are just strong enough to keep it liquid. A bit more energy is needed to overcome these forces and boil it. If water were not a liquid, life as we know it would be completely different! Ethanol contains carbon and oxygen bonding. The carbon atoms always form four bonds and the oxygen forms two. Remember, carbon forms 4 bonds, nitrogen forms 3 bonds and has one lone pair of electrons, and oxygen forms two bonds and looks bent. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Double and Triple  Covalent Bonds
 
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Learn how electrons are formed in a double and triple bond.
Views: 39596 The Science Classroom
What is a Coordinate Covalent Bond?
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into coordinate covalent bond. Line any covalent bond, electrons are shared. However, in a coordinate covalent bond, one atom donates both electrons that contribute to the formation of the bond. A lewis acid lewis base reaction can form a coordinate covalent bond as well as metal ligand interactions. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Covalent Bonding in Carbon Dioxide | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Carbon dioxide is a product of one of the most important chemical reactions in the world: combustion. Combustion is how a lot of people in the world heat their homes and power their cars. It also unfortunately contributes to the greenhouse effect and global warming. The carbon dioxide molecule is formed from one carbon atom and two oxygens. As an element, carbon only has 4 outer shell electrons and oxygen 6. Double covalent bonds form between the atoms, where two electrons from each atom are shared making 4 bonding electrons in total. The two groups of bonding electrons in carbon dioxide repel each other and this keeps the oxygen atoms as far away from each other as possible. Carbon dioxide is less reactive than water because it has two bonds with each oxygen. This means you need a lot more energy to break the atoms apart. Carbon dioxide's strong double bonds make it very stable and so whenever there are stray carbon and oxygen atoms flying about, they love to get together and form carbon dioxide. Like water, the bonds in carbon dioxide are POLAR COVALENT, making the carbon atom delta positive and the oxygens delta negative. Although, unlike water, carbon dioxide is not a polar molecule overall. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Covalent Bonding
 
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Covalent bonds form when nonmetals react with other nonmetals to from chemical compounds. Covalent bonds results from these elements sharing their electrons. Please Like and Subscribe. Learning more science at www.thescienceclassroom.org
Views: 16096 The Science Classroom
Covalent Network Solids
 
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025 - Covalent Network Solids In this video Paul Andersen explains how covalent network solids form elementally (like graphite) or by combining multiple nonmetals (like quartz). Covalent network solids contain elements from the carbon group because they have four valence electrons and can create three-dimensional shapes. Silicon crystals act as semiconductors and can be either n-type or p-type doped to increase their effectiveness. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Connormah. English: MAde by Me in AICS3, [object HTMLTableCellElement]. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lightning--.svg. "File:80486DX2 200x.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:80486DX2_200x.png. "File:Graphite-layers-side-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Graphite-layers-side-3D-balls.png. "File:GraphiteUSGOV.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:GraphiteUSGOV.jpg. "File:Monokristalines Silizium Für Die Waferherstellung.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Monokristalines_Silizium_f%C3%BCr_die_Waferherstellung.jpg. "File:Pencils Hb.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pencils_hb.jpg. "File:Quartz, Tibet.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, August 17, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Quartz,_Tibet.jpg&oldid=346538517. "File:Silicon-unit-cell-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Silicon-unit-cell-3D-balls.png. "File:Transbauformen.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Transbauformen.jpg. Materialscientist, Diamond_and_graphite jpg: User:Itubderivative work: Diamond and Graphite Samples with Their Respective Structures, 11:37 (UTC). Diamond_and_graphite.jpg. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Diamond_and_graphite2.jpg.
Views: 65807 Bozeman Science
Covalent Bonding Cocept | Fully Explained
 
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Support for CAF Classes 👉 - http://bit.ly/2KGXWfG (Voluntary Fee which is 100% Optional) दोस्तों नोट्स और Updates के लिए Telegram पर हमें JOIN करे । https://t.me/cafofficial What is covalent bonding ? A covalent bond, also called a molecular bond, is a chemical bond that involves the sharing of electron pairs between atoms. These electron pairs are known as shared pairs or bonding pairs, and the stable balance of attractive and repulsive forces between atoms, when they share electrons, is known as covalent bonding.
How Does Water Bond - Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
02:40
Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of water, when learning about covalent bonding within properties of matter. Water is made from one oxygen atom and two hydrogens. The oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell, but it really wants to have 8 to have a full shell. The hydrogens have one outer shell electron, but want to have two. The atoms share their electrons, forming covalent bonds. So all three atoms have full outer shells, and create a water molecule. Water has two covalent bonds. In water, the bonding electrons spend most of their time nearer the oxygen atom, because it is more ELECTRONEGATIVE. This means that it is electron withdrawing. As the negatively charged electrons are nearer the oxygen atom, the oxygen atom becomes a little bit negative itself, while the hydrogens become a little positive. This is called delta positive and delta negative. Water doesn’t just have any old covalent bonds; it has what we call POLAR COVALENT bonds and is a POLAR molecule. This is really important as it affects how water behaves and reacts with other elements. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Atomic Bonding Song
 
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Starring: Christie Wykes as Chlorine, Carbon, and Sodium Director of Photography: Sean McCallum Gravity (John Mayer Cover) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7KpH9_I2Dw I'm Atoms (Jason Mraz Cover) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBjZz0iQrzI Electricity (Jet Cover) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cY-kiddvAg0 Experiments A Cappella http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRbI_vPyOnc
Views: 492762 Veritasium
Chemical Bonds: Covalent vs. Ionic
 
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Mr. Andersen shows you how to determine if a bond is nonpolar covalent, polar covalent, or ionc. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 628689 Bozeman Science
Co-ordinate Covalent Bond
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, 040-64501777 / 65864777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. Co-ordinate covalent bond (or) Dative bond:The formation of Co-ordinate covalent bond was explained by "Sidwick"Definition: Dative bond is the bond formed by sharing of electron pair but the shared pair is contributed by one atom.Co- ordinate covalent bond is semi polar bond.Characteristics of dative bond:The atom which contributes the electron pair for sharing is called electron pair donor.The donor atom must have at least one pair of electrons in valence shell.An atom which accepts electron pair is called electron pair acceptor. It should have vacant orbital in valence shell.Co-ordinate covalent bond shown by an arrow "→" pointing from donor to acceptor.Let us study the concept with an example.Consider the formation of ammonium ion - NH4 Plus:In Ammonia molecule nitrogen has atomic number 7.The valence shell electronic configuration of nitrogen is 1S2 2S2 2Px1 2Py1 2Pz1.Nitrogen undergoes Sp3 hybridization with one lone pair of electron, one hybrid orbital, other three hybrid orbitals form three .bonds with three hydrogen atoms.In hydrogen ion - 1S vacant orbital is present.Therefore the nitrogen atom has one sp3 orbitals with lone pair which overlaps the vacant 1S orbitals of H+ ion to form co-ordinate covalent bond.Co-ordinate bond is rigid and directional like covalent bond.Properties of compounds with Co-ordinate covalent bond:They are gases or liquids due to weak inter molecular forces.The melting & boiling points of co-ordinate compounds are higher than covalent compounds, but lower than ionic compounds.Co-ordinate compounds are soluble in non polar solvents like benzene and carbon tetrachloride. They are insoluble in polar solvent like water.They are stable as covalent compounds. They undergo molecular reactions which are slow.They exhibit isomerism due to directional nature of bond.Examples: Formation of ammonia boron trifluoride molecule:In ammonia molecule nitrogen atom donates a pair of electrons to the boron fluoride molecule and shares them. A dative bond is formed between them. H3N → BF3
Views: 146168 7activestudio
Ionic Bonds, Polar Covalent Bonds, and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial explains how to identify a bond as an ionic bond, polar covalent bond, or a nonpolar covalent bond. Ionic bonds usually consist of metals and nonmetals where as covalent bonds consists of nonmetals. In a nonpolar covalent bond, electrons are shared equally and the electronegativity difference between the two atoms is 0.4 or less. For polar covalent bonds, the electrons are shared unequally between the two atoms and the electronegativity difference is defined to be 0.5 or more. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEWpbFLzoYGPfuWUMFPSaoA?sub_confirmation=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ New Organic Chemistry Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6unef5Hz6SU&index=1&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BXP7TUO7656wg0uF1xYnwgm&t=0s
Valence Bond Theory & Hybrid Atomic Orbitals
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into valence bond theory and hybrid atomic orbitals. It explains how to find the hybridization of carbon atom such as sp, sp2, and sp3. it also explains how to describe the orbitals that overlap to form a covalent bond. In addition, it explains how to determine the number of sigma and pi bonds in a molecule. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEWpbFLzoYGPfuWUMFPSaoA?sub_confirmation=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ New Organic Chemistry Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6unef5Hz6SU&index=1&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BXP7TUO7656wg0uF1xYnwgm&t=0s
TYPES OF CHEMICAL BOND AND COMPOUNDS | IONIC , ELECTROVALENT AND COVALENT COMPOUNDS
 
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TYPES OF CHEMICAL BOND AND COMPOUNDS | IONIC , ELECTROVALENT AND COVALENT COMPOUNDS, ATOMIC NUMBER, VALENCE ELECTRONS, VALENCY, CHEMICAL STABILITY, TRANSFER AND SHARING OF ELECTRONS, COMPOUND FORMATION, HOW ARE COMPOUNDS FORMED, WHY DO CHEMICALS REACT, HOW CHEMICALS REACT, ATOMS COMBINE, SINGLE, DOUBLE, TRIPLE COVALENT BOND
Views: 1332 EDU MANTRA
Naming Covalent Molecular Compounds
 
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We'll learn how to write names for compounds that are made of two nonmetals, sometimes called binary compounds. Binary compounds made of two nonmetals are called covalent or molecular because the elements are held together with covalent bonds, and they make molecules. In order to name them, we use the element name for the first element in the chemical formula, and then we use the -ide name for the second name in the chemical formula. Greek prefixes to show the number of atoms of each element, and these are put in front of the element names.
Views: 723178 Tyler DeWitt