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Michael Hammer and Business Process Re-engineering
 
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Michael Hammer and his concept of Business Process Re-engineering explained. Made by an Oxford Student of Economics and Management for a university project.
Views: 69513 Joe Prince
VPE15 - A Few Thoughts on Business Process Re-Engineering (BPR)
 
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http://howto-guru.com - Business Process Re-engineering (BPR) is an integral ongoing effort to a corporation. Businesses evolve, technologies improve and organizations regularly need to "Retool" to remain competitive and effective. This article provides some insights and "Best Practices" relating to being successful at BPR efforts. It also provides a guideline for defining high level process categories that are commonly found within a corporation that often cross hierarchical departments - where breaks in process are often found and need to be worked on to improve effectiveness. FIND ME ONLINE https://youtube.com/DanGrijzenhout123 : View my created videos posted on YouTube and SUBSCRIBE! http://howtoguru.org: My primary business site. This site contains my content, discounted Udemy course coupons, access to my books and: Software, electronics and other products that I have experience with and recommend as being good quality. https://www.udemy.com/u/dan-grijzenhout/ My profile page on the Udemy.com training site. Shows all of my currently available training courses. http://www.amazon.com/?tag=onltrabydangr-20 Support my content creation efforts and channel by shopping on Amazon http://howto-guru.com: My blog and “lead capture” site. I use this to communicate interactively with my subscribers and to promote products I recommend. (Helps me keep the lights on here!) https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/online-business-training-by/id1041824459/ : To find my ITunes podcast series https://www.pinterest.com/dgrijzenhout/: My stuff and my researched items are pinned here – check them out – plus some fun stuff I like. https://plus.google.com/u/0/+DanGrijz... View my content contributions on Google Plus https://www.facebook.com/Howtoguru.org : View my “Howtoguru.org” business page on Facebook.
Views: 53 Dan Grijzenhout
What is VALUE NETWORK ANALYSIS? What does VALUE NETWORK ANALYSIS mean?
 
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What is VALUE NETWORK ANALYSIS? What does VALUE NETWORK ANALYSIS mean? VALUE NETWORK ANALYSIS meaning - VALUE NETWORK ANALYSIS definition - VALUE NETWORK ANALYSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Value network analysis is a methodology for understanding, using, visualizing, optimizing internal and external value networks and complex economic ecosystems. The methods include visualizing sets of relationships from a dynamic whole systems perspective. Robust network analysis approaches are used for understanding value conversion of financial and non-financial assets, such as intellectual capital, into other forms of value. The value conversion question is critical in both social exchange theory that considers the cost/benefit returns of informal exchanges and more classical views of exchange value where there is concern with conversion of value into financial value or price. Value network analysis offers a taxonomy for non-financial business reporting, which is becoming increasingly important in SEC Filings. In some approaches taxonomies are supported by Extensible Business Reporting Language XBRL. Venture capitalists and investors are concerned with the capability of a firm to create value in future. Financial statements are limited to current and past financial indicators and valuations of capital assets. In contrast, value network analysis is one approach to assessing current and future capability for value creation and to describe and analyze a business model. Advocates of VNA claim that strong value-creating relationships support successful business endeavors at the operational, tactical, and strategic levels. A value network perspective, in this context would encompass both internal and external value networks — loose yet complex configurations of roles within industries, businesses, business units or functions and teams within organizations that engage in mutually beneficial relationships. Tools used in the past to analyze business value creation, such as the value chain and value added, are linear and mechanistic approaches based on a process perspective. These approaches are considered inadequate to address this new level of business complexity where value creating activities occur in complex, interdependent and dynamic relationships between multiple sets of actors. Other claims for value network analysis are that it is an essential skill for a successful enterprise dependent on knowledge exchanges and collaborative relationships, which are seen as critical in almost every industry. that this type of analysis helps individuals and work groups better manage their interactions and address operational issues, such as balancing workflows or improving communication. that the approach also scales up to the business level to help forge stronger value-creating linkages with strategic partners and improve stakeholder relationships. that it also connects with other modeling tools such as Lean Manufacturing, Six Sigma, workflow tools, business process reengineering, business process management, social network analysis tools and system dynamics. Value network analysis addresses both financial and non-financial value. Every business relationship includes contractual or mandated activities between participants — and also informal exchanges of knowledge, favors, and benefits. The analysis begins with a visual map or diagram that first shows the essential contractual, tangible revenue- or funding-related business transactions and exchanges that occur between each node of the networks. Nodes represent real people, typically individuals, groups of individuals such as a business unit or aggregates of groups such as a type of business in an industry network. During analysis when adopting a reflective, double loop or generative learning mode, it is beneficial to regard nodes as role plays (shortened to roles). Practitioners have found {2} that conversation between participants about role plays within a larger whole invariably results in transforming individual behaviour and gaining commitment to implementing needed change....
Views: 1688 The Audiopedia
Process Specification Language | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Process Specification Language Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Process Specification Language (PSL) is a set of logic terms used to describe processes. The logic terms are specified in an ontology that provides a formal description of the components and their relationships that make up a process. The ontology was developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and has been approved as an international standard in the document ISO 18629. The Process Specification Language can be used for the representation of manufacturing, engineering and business processes, including production scheduling, process planning, workflow management, business process reengineering, simulation, process realization, process modelling, and project management. In the manufacturing domain, PSL's objective is to serve as a common representation for integrating several process-related applications throughout the manufacturing process life cycle.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
What is EXIT CRITERIA? What does EXIT CRITERIA mean? EXIT CRITERIA meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is EXIT CRITERIA? What does EXIT CRITERIA mean? EXIT CRITERIA meaning - EXIT CRITERIA definition - EXIT CRITERIA explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Exit criteria are the criteria or requirements which must be met to complete a specific task or process as used in some fields of business or science, such as software engineering. The term exit criteria is often used in research and development, but it could be applicable to any field where Business process reengineering is (or could be) applied. The benefits of business process re-engineering — including the use of terms such as this one — could include: understanding goals clearly; using language (and data) carefully when talking about (or measuring) methods for getting things done; and taking a scientific approach towards evaluating and improving the methods that are used. For example, for Fagan inspection, the low-level document must comply with specific exit criteria (as specified in the high-level document) before the development process can be taken to the next phase. In telecommunications, when testing new software or hardware for release, a set of test specifications are created to test this new product to ensure that it meets minimum acceptable operational specifications. This test specification will state the minimum criteria necessary for the testing process to be considered complete and the product is ready for release IE: Exit the testing phase of the program.
Views: 483 The Audiopedia
Business Process Model and Notation
 
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Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) is a graphical representation for specifying business processes in a business process model. It is also known as Business Process Modeling Notation. Business Process Management Initiative (BPMI) developed BPMN, which has been maintained by the Object Management Group since the two organizations merged in 2005. As of March 2011, the current version of BPMN is 2.0. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 300 Audiopedia
What is BUSINESS RULE? What does BUSINESS RULE mean? BUSINESS RULE meaning & explanation
 
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What is BUSINESS RULE? What does BUSINESS RULE mean? BUSINESS RULE meaning - BUSINESS RULE definition - BUSINESS RULE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A business rule is a rule that defines or constrains some aspect of business and always resolves to either true or false. Business rules are intended to assert business structure or to control or influence the behavior of the business. Business rules describe the operations, definitions and constraints that apply to an organization. Business rules can apply to people, processes, corporate behavior and computing systems in an organization, and are put in place to help the organization achieve its goals. For example, a business rule might state that no credit check is to be performed on return customers. Other examples of business rules include requiring a rental agent to disallow a rental tenant if their credit rating is too low, or requiring company agents to use a list of preferred suppliers and supply schedules. While a business rule may be informal or even unwritten, documenting the rules clearly and making sure that they don't conflict is a valuable activity. When carefully managed, rules can be used to help the organization to better achieve goals, remove obstacles to market growth, reduce costly mistakes, improve communication, comply with legal requirements, and increase customer loyalty. Business rules tell an organization what it can do in detail, while strategy tells it how to focus the business at a macro level to optimize results. Put differently, a strategy provides high-level direction about what an organization should do. Business rules provide detailed guidance about how a strategy can be translated to action. Business rules exist for an organization whether or not they are ever written down, talked about or even part of the organization's consciousness. However it is a fairly common practice for organizations to gather business rules. This may happen in one of two ways. Organizations may choose to proactively describe their business practices, producing a database of rules. While this activity may be beneficial, it may be expensive and time-consuming. For example, they might hire a consultant to comb through the organization to document and consolidate the various standards and methods currently in practice. More commonly, business rules are discovered and documented informally during the initial stages of a project. In this case the collecting of the business rules is incidental. In addition, business projects, such as the launching of a new product or the re-engineering of a complex process, might lead to the definition of new business rules. This practice of incidental, or emergent, business rule gathering is vulnerable to the creation of inconsistent or even conflicting business rules within different organizational units, or within the same organizational unit over time. This inconsistency creates problems that can be difficult to find and fix. Allowing business rules to be documented during the course of business projects is less expensive and easier to accomplish than the first approach, but if the rules are not collected in a consistent manner, they are not valuable. In order to teach business people about the best ways to gather and document business rules, experts in business analysis have created the Business Rules Methodology. This methodology defines a process of capturing business rules in natural language, in a verifiable and understandable way. This process is not difficult to learn, can be performed in real-time, and empowers business stakeholders to manage their own business rules in a consistent manner. Gathering business rules is also called rules harvesting or business rule mining. The business analyst or consultant can extract the rules from IT documentation (like use cases, specifications or system code). They may also organize workshops and interviews with subject matter experts (commonly abbreviated as SMEs). Software technologies designed to capture business rules through analysis of legacy source code or of actual user behavior can accelerate the rule gathering processing.
Views: 4926 The Audiopedia
Process management
 
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Process management is the ensemble of activities of planning and monitoring the performance of a process. The term usually refers to the management of business processes and manufacturing processes. Business process management (BPM) and business process reengineering are interrelated, but not identical. Process management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, techniques and systems to define, visualize, measure, control, report and improve processes with the goal to meet customer requirements profitably. It can be differentiated from program management in that program management is concerned with managing a group of inter-dependent projects. But from another viewpoint, process management includes program management. In project management, process management is the use of a repeatable process to improve the outcome of the project. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 31 Audiopedia
Business process mapping
 
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Business process mapping refers to activities involved in defining what a business entity does, who is responsible, to what standard a business process should be completed, and how the success of a business process can be determined. The main purpose behind business process mapping is to assist organizations in becoming more efficient. A clear and detailed business process map or diagram allows outside firms to come in and look at whether or not improvements can be made to the current process. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 64 Audiopedia
The Thinking Leader's Process Maturity Model
 
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Go to https://www.sebasolutions.com to learn more about Dr. James Brown, project management and leadership speaker. Organizations and people strive to be mature. The question is how do you assess maturity? Some in the project management community strongly believe that creation and adherence to many processes equates to maturity. Project management process maturity is in the eye of the beholder. This means the amount of process should be dependent upon the context of the organization and more process does not necessarily result in more maturity. Presuming the organizational leaders have identified the right amount of processes that best fit their organizational context, the thinking leader’s project management process maturity model can be characterized with three simple questions. 1. Do we have a process? 2. Do we follow the process to execute the work? 3. Do we improve the process? Answering these three questions and assessing the root cause for non-compliance, and the impact of non-compliance allows the thinking leader to keep a good grasp on process maturity. Some consulting organizations specialize in taking something that is straightforward, transforming it into a complex model and then use their reputation to sell the model to the masses as a solution to their problems.  Contrast the three questions above for the thinking leader, with one well known project management process maturity model that has more than 200 pages and over 1400 hundred recognized contributors that are identified in the document by name! Yes, I counted them, over 1400! It brings to mind a quote by a famous psychiatrist. “A collection of 100 great brains makes one big fathead” – Carl Jung 1400 great brains must make a ginormous fathead. If you believe a 200 plus page document with over a thousand contributors is the solution to your organizational problems, then break out your company’s check book because this project management process maturity model recommends you hire someone certified in its use to provide a rigorous assessment. You and your leadership team must not be capable enough to do it yourself after studying the 200 pages. Here’s a tip... “If you can’t understand it in 3 minutes and/or it can’t be clearly explained in a single page or less, odds are it is too complicated to be of value to your organization.” I recognize many in the project management community may not agree with the this article and will cite the successes sophisticated maturity models and processes have provided organizations.  I am not disputing the value of these instances, however it has been my experience that most of the value that results from sophisticated assessments occurs when the organization has to get the basics, the fundamentals in place to allow use of the model or process.  These basics or fundamentals are easily achieved without the complex assessment by a thinking leader. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrJamesTBrown LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drjtb Google+: https://plus.google.com/1096289805720... Twitter: https://twitter.com/drjamestbrown 321-269-1222
Views: 357 SEBA Solutions
What is ENTERPRISE INTEGRATION? What does ENTERPRISE INTEGRATION mean?
 
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What is ENTERPRISE INTEGRATION? What does ENTERPRISE INTEGRATION mean? ENTERPRISE INTEGRATION meaning - ENTERPRISE INTEGRATION definition - ENTERPRISE INTEGRATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Enterprise integration is a technical field of enterprise architecture, which focused on the study of topics such as system interconnection, electronic data interchange, product data exchange and distributed computing environments. It is a concept in enterprise engineering to provide the right information at the right place and at the right time and thereby enable communication between people, machines and computers and their efficient co-operation and co-ordination. Requirements and principles deal with determining the business drivers and guiding principles that help in the development of the enterprise architecture. Each functional and non-functional requirement should be traceable to one or more business drivers. Organizations are beginning to become more aware of the need for capturing and managing requirements. Use-case modeling is one of the techniques that is used for doing this. Enterprise Integration, according to Brosey et al. (2001), "aims to connect and combines people, processes, systems, and technologies to ensure that the right people and the right processes have the right information and the right resources at the right time". Enterprise Integration is focused on optimizing operations in a world which could be considered full of continuous and largely unpredictable change. Changes occur in single manufacturing companies just as well as in an "everchanging set of extended or virtual enterprises". It enables the actors to make "quick and accurate decisions and adaptation of operations to respond to emerging threats and opportunities". Enterprise integration has been discussed since the early days of computers in industry and especially in the manufacturing industry with computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) as the acronym for operations integration. In spite of the different understandings of the scope of integration in CIM it has always stood for information integration across at least parts of the enterprise. Information integration essentially consists of providing the right information, at the right place, at the right time. In the 1990s enterprise integration and enterprise engineering became a focal point of discussions with active contribution of many disciplines. The state of the art in enterprise engineering and integration by the end of the 1990s has been rather confusing, according to Jim Nell and Kurt Kosanke (1997): On one hand, it claims to provide solutions for many of the issues identified in enterprise integration. On the other hand, the solutions seem to compete with each other, use conflicting terminology and do not provide any clues on their relations to solutions on other issues. Workflow modelling, business process modelling, business process reengineering (BPR), and concurrent engineering all aim toward identifying and providing the information needed in the enterprise operation. In addition, numerous integrating-platforms concepts are promoted with only marginal or no recognition or support of information identification. Tools claiming to support enterprise modelling exist in very large numbers, but the support is rather marginal, especially if models are to be used by the end user, for instance, in decision support.
Views: 1266 The Audiopedia
Make Your HR Business Processes Simple and Efficient
 
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Streamline critical HR business processes such as employee onboarding, offer letter generation, and digital signature capture
Views: 168 IntellinetCorp
What is UPWARD COMMUNICATION? What does UPWARD COMMUNICATION mean? UPWARD COMMUNICATION meaning
 
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What is UPWARD COMMUNICATION? What does UPWARD COMMUNICATION mean? UPWARD COMMUNICATION meaning - UPWARD COMMUNICATION definition - UPWARD COMMUNICATION explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Upward communication is the process of information flowing from the lower levels of a hierarchy to the upper levels. This type of communication is becoming more popular in organizations as traditional forms of communication are becoming less popular. The more traditional organization types such as a hierarchy, places people into separate ranks. Upward communication helps employees to express their requirements, ideas, and feelings. For the top management, upward communication is an important source of information for business decisions. It helps in alerting top management about the requirement of changes in an organisations. Upward contribution is the core contributor of business process re-engineering in many organisations. Upward communication is widely used as part of whistleblowing policy in many large organisations. Under whistle blowing policy, each employee is permitted to directly communicate with top management about matters requiring examination on vigilance angle. Hence it is used as a fraud prevention tool as well. Upward communication keeps managers aware of how employees feel about their jobs, policies and procedures, and the business in general. It consists of methods like Feedback from employees, helps in bringing Mutual Trust and helps the organization to determine, implement or decide upon new policies. It keeps the organization updated or prone to upcoming challenges. Upward communication is not free from disadvantages too. It suffers from problems like information can be changed during transmission, unwillingness to participate, fear of inefficiency, bypassing and flattery too. Sometimes top level executives discourage the upward flow of information and neglect the constructive suggestions and opinions about the work related issues of the organization. It is a time taking process and is comparatively slow too.
Views: 1506 The Audiopedia
How to Manage a Profitability Turnaround
 
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About the Presentation We now live in the Age of Precision Markets, yet most of the management processes taught in business schools were developed for the prior Age of Mass Markets. Today's savviest managers are exploiting this disconnect by rethinking strategy and, in the process, developing fresh approaches to customer relations, operations, and metrics. Dr. Jonathan Byrnes believes that every business has enormous potential waiting to be unleashed and in this webinar, he offers bold new strategies to help you find and grow your islands of profit. Byrnes will discuss an astonishing fact from his award-winning new book, Islands of Profit in a Sea of Red Ink: it is possible for every manager to meet or exceed budget targets and for the company to still have an enormous portion of its business remain unprofitable. In fact, nearly 40 percent of every company is unprofitable by any measure, and 20 to 30 percent is so profitable that it provides all the reported earnings and subsidizes the losses. Dr. Byrnes will explain -- and then reject -- such harmful myths as: Revenues are good, costs are bad All customers should get the same great service If everyone does his or her job well, the company will prosper In addition he will provide a practical, step-by-step guide to raising net profits by as much as 50 percent. About the Speaker Jonathan L.S. Byrnes, senior lecturer at MIT, is an acknowledged authority on supply chain management, account management, and profitability management. His extensive experience spans virtually every industry, including healthcare, transportation, software, retail, financial services, distribution, and others. At MIT, Dr. Byrnes has taught at the graduate level and in executive programs for 20 years. He has authored over 100 books, articles, cases, notes, and expert submissions. In addition, he wrote a monthly column on managing profitability for Harvard Business School's Working Knowledge for four years, and recently authored Islands of Profit in a Sea of Red Ink, which Inc.com named to its list of Best Business Books of 2010. He also is president of Jonathan Byrnes & Co., a consulting company founded in 1976. In that role he has advised over 50 major companies, medical institutions, and industry associations. Dr. Byrnes serves on the Board of Directors of MSC Industrial Direct, Inc. (a New York Stock Exchange company) and has served on the advisory boards of Objectiva Software and Autopart International, two companies that were acquired at a substantial gain. He currently serves on the advisory boards of RMG Networks, OCO, and WaveMark, all development-stage companies. Dr. Byrnes earned a DBA from Harvard University in 1980.
Views: 442 MITSDM
Our Big Data Human Story | Mark Abdollahian | TEDxLaSierraUniversity
 
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Is the social world random or deterministic? Is it fate or fortune that governs our lives? Dr. Mark Abdollahian explores the weaving of our social and emotional collective history through the lens of big data, analytics and music. Taking us on a global journey across the pulse of the planet, he illuminates answers to the very real, personal questions of who does what to whom, how, where, and when to hopefully understand why. While the world might be complex, it is not incomprehensible. Dr. Mark Abdollahian is Chief Executive Officer (CEO) at ACERTAS. His focus is on designing and delivering advanced analytics for data driven decision-making. His global experience spans corporate strategy, national policy, economic development, finance, public-private partnerships, M&A and business process re-engineering. He creates, architects and implements enterprise class data and strategy analytics used by the US Government, the World Bank and the United Nations as well as private sector companies worldwide. He is author of Power Transitions: Strategies for the 21st Century, The Performance of Nations, and dozens of articles on data driven strategy across business, politics and economics. Dr. Abdollahian is a board member for several private and nonprofit enterprises, lecturing to audiences worldwide on strategy and analytics. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 56370 TEDx Talks
Process Specification Language | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Process Specification Language Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Process Specification Language (PSL) is a set of logic terms used to describe processes. The logic terms are specified in an ontology that provides a formal description of the components and their relationships that make up a process. The ontology was developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and has been approved as an international standard in the document ISO 18629. The Process Specification Language can be used for the representation of manufacturing, engineering and business processes, including production scheduling, process planning, workflow management, business process reengineering, simulation, process realization, process modelling, and project management. In the manufacturing domain, PSL's objective is to serve as a common representation for integrating several process-related applications throughout the manufacturing process life cycle.
Views: 6 Subhajit Sahu
Changing Company Behaviors and Changing Business Processes
 
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change proceeds improvements Jack D. Deal Business Analysis
Views: 37 Jack D. Deal
What is NONLINEAR MANAGEMENT? What does NONLINEAR MANAGEMENT mean? NONLINEAR MANAGEMENT meaning
 
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What is NONLINEAR MANAGEMENT? What does NONLINEAR MANAGEMENT mean? NONLINEAR MANAGEMENT meaning - NONLINEAR MANAGEMENT definition - NONLINEAR MANAGEMENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Linear management is the application of reductionism to management problems, often relying on the ability to predict, engineer and control outcomes by manipulating the component parts of a business (organization, operation, policy, process and so on). Business process reengineering (BPR) is a popular example of linear management at work. The key defining characteristic of linear management is that order is imposed – usually from above. However, many argue that such an approach – treating organizations as machines to be engineered in this way – simply doesn't work. Businesses are too complex and too unpredictable. The results of many BPR projects in the 1990s suggests that this argument might be correct. Nonlinear management (NLM) is a superset of management techniques and strategies that allows order to emerge by giving organizations the space to self-organize, evolve and adapt, encompassing Agile, "evolutionary" and "lean" approaches, flextime, time banking, as well as many others. Key aspects of NLM, including holism, evolutionary design or delivery, and self-organization are diametrically opposite to linear management thinking.
Views: 45 The Audiopedia
Redesign processes first, then apply automation to solve problems, says Dr. Peter Martin
 
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Read the story related to this video: http://www.controleng.com/single-article/create-value-with-automation-redesign-processes-first/63be76005bbbd7f760adee673f2c779f.html Applying automation can be one of the most valuable investments a company can make, but often a company does not invest in automation as it should, or it applies automation to an outdated process. The focus should first be on solving problems, explains Dr. Peter Martin, vice president business value consulting, Schneider Electric, at the 2015 CSIA Executive Conference. In this three-minute video, Martin provides four bits of advice. Most engineering project teams are judged by on-time and on-budget delivery rather than on delivering value. By measuring value, automation can add much more profit to the bottom line, Martin said. See related article at www.controleng.com for details: “Create value with automation: redesign processes first.” Courtesy: Mark T. Hoske, Control Engineering, CFE Media
Views: 570 ControlEngTV
ERP Implementation: 7 Strategies to See ROI Sooner
 
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Watch the 2-minute overview giving you 7 strategies to see ROI from an ERP implementation, sooner. Don't miss these simple tips that can make all the difference to your implementation. Read the full article for more in-depth information about each of the strategies: https://erp-blog.jcurvesolutions.com/7-strategies-to-see-roi-from-your-erp-implementation-sooner -------------------------------------------------------------- JCurve Solutions is a cloud ERP solution provider and exclusive AU & NZ provider of the small business edition of NetSuite, JCurve ERP. Find out more about JCurve ERP and get your free, tailored demo at: https://www.jcurvesolutions.com/demo/
Views: 3480 JCurve Solutions
What is TECHNOLOGY ALIGNMENT? What does TECHNOLOGY ALIGNMENT mean? TECHNOLOGY ALIGNMENT meaning
 
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What is TECHNOLOGY ALIGNMENT? What does TECHNOLOGY ALIGNMENT mean? TECHNOLOGY ALIGNMENT meaning - TECHNOLOGY ALIGNMENT definition - TECHNOLOGY ALIGNMENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Business and technology alignment, or just technology alignment, corrects terminology and assumptions used in business to better match those of technology and standards anticipated in the technology strategy and technology roadmaps. When technology is changing very rapidly in an industry, the aligning of business terms to the distinctions that the technology requires tends to dominate any enterprise taxonomy development effort. In such circumstances, consultants or specific technology training is usually required, as the organization lacks the internal skills or experience with the technologies that it expects to be using soon. In government, for example, citizen use of the Internet and the increased availability of teleworkers has presented special challenges and opportunities, typically called "e-government". At the same time, internal operational efficiencies have become more of a priority due to rising competition between jurisdictions. Often the first step is to limit the number of different departments or agencies involved. By "consolidating the technology operations of 91 state agencies into the Virginia Information Technology Agency, the State of Virginia estimates an eventual savings of nearly $100 million a year." - "Similarly, the U.S. National Performance Review recommended a data processing consolidation and modernization initiative citing industry experience suggesting operational savings of between 30% and 50%." - While "California is the cradle of the information technology industry" its own state government claims that "collaborative exploration and exploitation of emerging technologies is extremely rare within state government", accordingly it seeks to "improve customer relationships through online services." However such efforts tend to rely very much on driving personalities and leadership. After one resignation, the state "lost the vision and executive sponsorship that contributed to its success and the national recognition of California's emerging eGovernment activities." This is a major problem in all technology alignment. In Canada, a similar nationwide effort called Service Canada has similar goals, and has run into similar problems: "The big complaints are that departments fight over their turf and are organized to serve the bureaucracy, not Canadians. They don’t share data, information, common infrastructure, technology or integrate their business processes. Senior bureaucrats are often accused of being out of touch with the needs of Canadians." - The government claims that it "is expected to save C$3 billion over five years by automating manual operations, consolidating call centres and reducing overpayments in Canada Pension Plan and employment service." It "will need to spend about C$500 million for technology, consolidate or move offices and retrain the thousands of workers whose jobs were eliminated by automation." When, as in California or Canada, new leadership and massive change to operations is required, technology alignment may simply excuse a massive business process reengineering and downsizing exercise. This too is a common situation in technology alignment: using the fact of new technology as a pretext for other large changes. However, as with all such exercises, there are claims that better service will result, by (in Canada) "opening new offices and creating more front-line jobs in local communities" or (in California) "a 20% reduction in the workforce performing shared services" and of "nearly 9,000 state employees... about 3,600 are engaged in common core functions. An eventual 20% reduction in this workforce segment is possible through attrition when phased in over 5 years." - These claims also are fairly typical: despite a longstanding admission among experts that there is a "productivity paradox", the introduction of new information technology and more automated work processes are always assumed to be "more efficient" than what they replace. Accordingly, technology alignment is probably not a passing fad, but, seems to be driven by factors built into business and technology culture.
Views: 37 The Audiopedia
Best Practices in Auditing ISO/IEC 27001
 
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Due to the dramatic increase of threats worldwide, there is a need for the companies to find ways how to increase the information security. Therefore, one solution is to implement the ISO/IEC 27001 in order to protect information both internally and externally. Main points that will be covered are: • The scope of ISO 27001 & associated other standards references • Information Security and ISIM Terminologies • ISIM auditing principles • Managing audit program & audit activities Presenter: Eng. Kefah El-Ghobbas is a specialist in ‘Business Process Excellence' through ‘Business Process Re-engineering' with over 20 years of experience. Organizer: Gezim Zeneli Date: September 13, 2016 Slides of the webinar: http://www.slideshare.net/PECBCERTIFICATION/best-practices-in-auditing-isoiec-27001 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Find out more about ISO 27001 Information Security Management standard: Training: https://pecb.com/iso-iec-27001-training-courses Webinars: https://pecb.com/webinars Article: https://pecb.com/article/information-security-in-banks-and-financial-institutions Whitepaper: https://pecb.com/whitepaper/no-iso-27001-certified-companies-among-largest-data-breaches-2014-2015 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more information about PECB: Website: https://pecb.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/pecb/ Google +: https://plus.google.com/+PECBGroup Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PECBInternational/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/PECBGroup Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/PECBCERTIFICATION
Views: 5274 PECB
Business process management
 
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Business process management (BPM) is a management discipline that focuses on improving corporate performance by managing and optimising a company's business processes. It can therefore be described as a "process optimization process." It is argued that BPM enables organizations to be more efficient, more effective and more capable of change than a functionally focused, traditional hierarchical management approach. These processes can impact the cost and revenue generation of an organization. As a managerial approach, BPM sees processes as strategic assets of an organization that must be understood, managed, and improved to deliver value-added products and services to clients. This approach closely resembles other Total Quality Management or Continuous Improvement Process methodologies and BPM proponents also claim that this approach can be supported, or enabled, through technology. As such, many BPM articles and pundits frequently discuss BPM from one of two viewpoints: people and/or technology. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 105 Audiopedia
Outsourcing Definition - What Is Outsourcing? | http://careerfh.com
 
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In this article I'll share with you the outsourcing definition from different sources, my take on it and I'll give access to a free webinar to learn more about it. Hey, good day folks, I’m André Givogue, your friendly host here for CareerFH! Have you ever wondered what the outsourcing definition is? As entrepreneur, you've probably more than likely come across the term outsourcing by now and it can sort of be frustrating. I'll share with you a few outsourcing definition that I found, then I'll share with you the way I think of it. According to Dictionary.com, it says: "Outsource" can be used as a verb (used with object), outsourced, outsourcing. (of a company or organization) to purchase (goods) or subcontract(services) from an outside supplier or source. to contract out (jobs, services, etc.): a small business that outsources bookkeeping to an accounting firm. verb (used without object), outsourced, outsourcing. to obtain goods or services from an outside source: "U.S. companies who outsource from China." The Business Dictionary says: The contracting or subcontracting of noncore activities to free up cash, personnel, time, and facilities for activities in which a company holds competitive advantage. Companies having strengths in other areas may contract out data processing, legal, manufacturing, marketing, payroll accounting, or other aspects of their businesses to concentrate on what they do best and thus reduce average unit cost. Outsourcing is often an integral part of downsizing or reengineering. Also called contracting out. Finally here are a few relevant excerpts that I found on Wikipedia In business, outsourcing involves the contracting out of a business process to another party (compare business process outsourcing). The term "outsourcing" dates back to at least 1981. Outsourcing sometimes involves transferring employees and assets from one firm to another, but not always. Outsourcing includes both foreign and domestic contracting, and sometimes includes offshoring (relocating a business function to another country). Financial savings from lower international labor rates can provide a major motivation for outsourcing/offshoring. From what I gathered, the "outsourcing definition" is pretty much an extension of the "outsource definition" and the way I define outsourcing is that basically if you're starting up your business and don't have employees yet, the tasks that you can't do or don't have time to do you delegate to someone else through hiring an outsourcing firm or hiring an independent contractor, also known as a virtual worker. This also works if you are a big company, you can outsource specialized tasks that are only temporary, hence why you can justify hiring a full time employee for just that. So again, my definition of outsourcing is pretty much to get someone else, better qualified than you to get the job done on a per contract basis. It could be for a day like it could be for a month, you decide. If you'd like to get more information on outsourcing, I invite you to watch this free 59 minute webinar. In there you'll learn how an engineer was able to get 25 hours worth of work done in a 24 hour period while working is 50 hours/week job. What about you, what is your outsourcing definition? Share your thoughts and comments down below and thanks for watching this episode CareerFH – Start Your Career From Home Today! If you want more tips and tricks on starting your own Career From Home then come visit our blog at www.careerfh.com. There you’ll find more in-depth videos and information to get you started and off the ground. If you got value out of this video, show us your appreciation by clicking on the like button, share it with your friends and family and to get more videos like these make sure you subscribe. Like always; have an awesome day, cheers everybody! Click on the link below to see more information http://careerfh.com/outsourcing-definition-outsourcing _________________ Main Site http://careerfh.com Facebook Page http://www.facebook.com/Givogue.Andre
Views: 9888 Andre Givogue
Venture into the impossible with analytics: Mark Abdollahian at TEDxLaSierraUniversity
 
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More data has been collected in the past three years than the rest of human history combined.With this funny and informative talk, Mark Abdollahian makes understanding analytics simple and shows us how it can be used to create the future. Dr. Abdollahian delivers advanced analytics for data-driven decision making. His global experience spans corporate strategy, national policy, economic development, finance, public-private partnerships, M&A and business process reengineering. He creates, architects and implements enterprise class data and strategy analytics used by the US Government, the World Bank and the United Nations as well as private sector companies worldwide. He is Chief Executive Officer of Acertas, cofounder of Sentia Group and a Clinical Professor at the School of Politics and Economics, Claremont Graduate University. Dr. Abdollahian has bachelors degrees from Case Western Reserve University, and a Master's and Ph.D. in Political Economy and Mathematical Modeling from Claremont Graduate University. He is author of Power Transitions: Strategies for the 21st Century, The Performance of Nations, and dozens of articles on data driven strategy across business, politics and economics. Dr. Abdollahian is a board member for several private and nonprofit enterprises, lecturing to audiences worldwide on strategy and analytics. View his full bio and learn more at http://www.tedxlasierrauniversity.com/ In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 62115 TEDx Talks
How to green the world's deserts and reverse climate change | Allan Savory
 
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"Desertification is a fancy word for land that is turning to desert," begins Allan Savory in this quietly powerful talk. And terrifyingly, it's happening to about two-thirds of the world's grasslands, accelerating climate change and causing traditional grazing societies to descend into social chaos. Savory has devoted his life to stopping it. He now believes -- and his work so far shows -- that a surprising factor can protect grasslands and even reclaim degraded land that was once desert. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 3103434 TED
What Is The Process Of Management?
 
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Process management wikipediawhat is process management? What Definition and meaning four functions of planning, organizing explain the enotes process, thought. The term usually refers to the management of business processes and manufacturing. The basic process of project management pmiprocess improvement what is bpm meaning. Of the in our process management consulting room we answer some basic questions and provide links to further resources as well more articles from panel on feb 4, 2016 it service go hand itil states how processes should be is an approach organizational design that implies activities performed within company are organized optimized we'll help you create efficient based your formulated strategy, vision mission will realise goals. Process management is the ensemble of activities planning and monitoring performance a business process. What is business process management? Aiimprocess management processes of organization and. Our process management the draft outlines basic project processes of planning, executing, and controlling; The interactions get more information on improvement implement best practices in your organization business bpm is a holistic, top down approach that focuses optimizing operations to maximize customer. Business process execution language (bpel) and business management notation (bpmn is a concept that integrates quality performance excellence into the strategic of organizations. What is business process management (bpm)? Definition from strategy, organization, levels, system transition supportit wikiprocess pwc. Many modern organizations are functional and hierarchical; They suffer from business process management (bpm) is a systematic approach to making an organization's workflow more effective, efficient capable of adapting ever changing environment. Googleusercontent search. Process management wikipedia process wikipedia en. Wikipedia wiki process_management url? Q webcache. Business process management (bpm) and business reengineering are interrelated, but not identical refers to aligning processes with an organization's strategic goals, designing implementing architectures, establishing measurement systems that align organizational educating organizing managers so they will manage effectively many of the employees were left worried after head human resources announced a firm would be engaging in increase 4 basic functions planning, organizing, leading controlling perform achieve goals get answer for 'explain process? ' find homework help other questions at enotes jan 19, 2015 dr. G c mohanta, be, msc(engg), mba, phd(mgt) professor jan 6, 2010 these are the six basic inputs in management process (six m's of management) and output is form achievement objectives term business covers how we study, identify, change, monitor processes to ensure they run smoothly can be an analytical method that includes any specific methods, tools, skill sets, or methods used control a certain jul 15, 1998 managers today enamored.
Views: 7 Lanora Hurn Tipz
What is SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT? WHAT does SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT mean?
 
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What is SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT? WHAT does SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT mean? SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT meaning - SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT definition - SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Scientific management is a theory of management that analyzes and synthesizes workflows. Its main objective is improving economic efficiency, especially labor productivity. It was one of the earliest attempts to apply science to the engineering of processes and to management. One early approach to scientific management is known as Taylorism after its founder. Its development began in the United States with Frederick Winslow Taylor in the 1880s and '90s within the manufacturing industries. Its peak of influence came in the 1910s; by the 1920s, it was still influential but had entered into competition and syncretism with opposing or complementary ideas. Although scientific management as a distinct theory or school of thought was obsolete by the 1930s, most of its themes are still important parts of industrial engineering and management today. These include analysis; synthesis; logic; rationality; empiricism; work ethic; efficiency and elimination of waste; standardization of best practices; disdain for tradition preserved merely for its own sake or to protect the social status of particular workers with particular skill sets; the transformation of craft production into mass production; and knowledge transfer between workers and from workers into tools, processes, and documentation. While the terms "scientific management" and "Taylorism" are commonly treated as synonymous, the work of Frederick Taylor marks only the first form of scientific management, followed by other approaches; thus in today's management theory, Taylorism is sometimes called, or considered a subset of, the classical perspective on scientific management. Taylor's own names for his approach initially included "shop management" and "process management". When Louis Brandeis popularized the term "scientific management" in 1910, Taylor recognized it as another good name for the concept, and adopted it in his 1911 monograph. Taylor rejected the notion, which was universal in his day and still held today, that the trades, including manufacturing, were resistant to analysis and could only be performed by craft production methods. In the course of his empirical studies, Taylor examined various kinds of manual labor. For example, most bulk materials handling was manual at the time; material handling equipment as we know it today was mostly not developed yet. He looked at shoveling in the unloading of railroad cars full of ore; lifting and carrying in the moving of iron pigs at steel mills; the manual inspection of bearing balls; and others. He discovered many concepts that were not widely accepted at the time. For example, by observing workers, he decided that labor should include rest breaks so that the worker has time to recover from fatigue, either physical (as in shoveling or lifting) or mental (as in the ball inspection case). Workers were allowed to take more rests during work, and productivity increased as a result. Flourishing in the late 19th and early 20th century, scientific management built on earlier pursuits of economic efficiency. While it was prefigured in the folk wisdom of thrift, it favored empirical methods to determine efficient procedures rather than perpetuating established traditions. Thus it was followed by a profusion of successors in applied science, including time and motion study, the Efficiency Movement (which was a broader cultural echo of scientific management's impact on business managers specifically), Fordism, operations management, operations research, industrial engineering, management science, manufacturing engineering, logistics, business process management, business process reengineering, lean manufacturing, and Six Sigma. There is a fluid continuum linking scientific management with the later fields, and the different approaches often display a high degree of compatibility. Subsequent forms of scientific management were articulated by Taylor's disciples, such as Henry Gantt; other engineers and managers, such as Benjamin S. Graham; and other theorists, such as Max Weber. Taylor's work also contrasts with other efforts, including those of Henri Fayol and those of Frank Gilbreth, Sr. and Lillian Moller Gilbreth (whose views originally shared much with Taylor's but later diverged in response to Taylorism's inadequate handling of human relations).
Views: 6920 The Audiopedia
Who Doesn't Love a Good Scandal? Qube Investment Management Comments on VW
 
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Ready our report at: http://qubeconsulting.ca/publications/archives/2015/10/22/qube-quarterly-2015-q3/ Especially, when there is important investor wisdom to be found! This quarter’s theme is “Lessons Learned,” with our lead article talking about the VW debacle and the importance of governance research in the investment decision process.
Views: 311 Qubetips
What is SUPPLY NETWORK? What does SUPPLY NETWORK mean? SUPPLY NETWORK meaning & explanation
 
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What is SUPPLY NETWORK? What does SUPPLY NETWORK mean? SUPPLY NETWORK meaning - SUPPLY NETWORK definition - SUPPLY NETWORK explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ?sub_confirmation=1 Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A supply network is a pattern of temporal and spatial processes carried out at facility nodes and over distribution links, which adds value for customers through the manufacturing and delivery of products. It comprises the general state of business affairs in which all kinds of material (work-in-process material as well as finished products) are transformed and moved between various value-added points to maximize the value added for customers. A supply chain is a special instance of a supply network in which raw materials, intermediate materials and finished goods are procured exclusively as products through a chain of processes that supply one another. In the semiconductors industry, for example, work-in-process moves from fabrication to assembly, and then to the test house. The term "supply network" refers to the high-tech phenomenon of contract manufacturing where the brand owner does not touch the product. Instead, she coordinates with contract manufacturers and component suppliers who ship components to the brand owner. This business practice requires the brand owner to stay in touch with multiple parties or "network" at once. A resilient supply network effectively aligns its strategy, operations, management systems, governance structure, and decision-support capabilities so that it can uncover and adjust to continually changing risks, endure disruptions to its primary earnings drivers, and create advantages over less adaptive competitors. Moreover, it has the capability to respond rapidly to unforeseen changes, even chaotic disruption. The resilience of a supply network is the ability to bounce back – and, in fact, to bounce forward with speed, determination and precision. In recent studies, resilience is regarded as the next phase in the evolution of traditional, place-centric enterprise structures to highly virtualized, customer-centric structures that enable people to work anytime, anywhere. Resilient supply networks should align its strategy and operations to adapt to risk that affects its capacities. There are 4 levels of supply chain resilience: 1. reactive supply chain management. 2. internal supply chain integration with planned buffers. 3. collaboration across extended supply chain networks. 4. a dynamic supply chain adaptation and flexibility. From the strategic resilient viewpoint, a supply network must dynamically reinvent business models and strategies as circumstances change. It is not about responding to a one-time crisis, or just having a flexible supply chain. It is about continuously anticipating and adjusting to discontinuities that can permanently impair the value preposition of a core business with focus on delivering customer satisfaction. Strategic resilience requires continuous innovation with respect to product structures, processes, but also corporate behaviour. Renewal can be regarded as the natural consequence of a supply network’s innate strategic resilience. In terms of operational resilience, the supply networks must respond to the ups and downs of the business cycle or to quickly rebalance product-service mix, processes, and supply chain, by bolstering enterprises agility, flexibility and robustness in the face of changing environments.
Views: 116 The Audiopedia
How Finding & Fixing Faults is the Path to Perfection - Steven Spear
 
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DOES18 Las Vegas — Discovering Your Way to Greatness: How Finding and Fixing Faults is the Path to Perfection Steven J. Spear is the author of the award-winning and critically acclaimed book, The High Velocity Edge. He is a senior lecturer at MIT Sloan School of Management and is a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. He is also a founder of a consulting firm built on the tenets of his book, and of See to Solve Corp., a business process software company. Expert on the ways that “high-velocity organizations” generate and sustain advantage, even in the most hyper-competitive markets, Spear has worked with clients spanning technology and heavy industry, software and healthcare, and new production design and manufacturing. Spear’s 1999 Harvard Business Review article, “Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System,” is part of today’s lean manufacturing canon. “Fixing Healthcare from the Inside, Today” was an HBR McKinsey Award winner in 2005 and one of his four articles to win a Shingo Research Prize. Spear helped develop and deploy the Alcoa Business System, which recorded hundreds of millions of dollars in annual operating savings, and he was integral in developing the “Perfecting Patient Care” system for the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative. He has published in the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Annals of Internal Medicine, and Academic Medicine, and he has spoken to audiences ranging from the Association for Manufacturing Excellence to the Institute of Medicine. Spear has a doctorate from Harvard Business School, a master’s in engineering and in management from MIT, and a bachelor’s degree in economics from Princeton. Dr. Steve Spear, Principal, HVE LLC DOES18 Las Vegas DOES 2018 US DevOps Enterprise Summit 2018 https://events.itrevolution.com/us/
Views: 1625 IT Revolution
What is TERMINOLOGY SCIENCE? What does TERMINOLOGY SCIENCE mean? TERMINOLOGY SCIENCE meaning
 
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What is TERMINOLOGY SCIENCE? What does TERMINOLOGY SCIENCE mean? TERMINOLOGY SCIENCE meaning - TERMINOLOGY SCIENCE definition - TERMINOLOGY SCIENCE explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Terminology science is a branch of linguistics studying special vocabulary. The main objects of terminological studies are special lexical units (or special lexemes), first of all terms. They are analysed from the point of view of their origin, formal structure, their meanings and also functional features. Terms are used to denote concepts, therefore terminology science also concerns itself with the formation and development of concepts, as well as with the principles of exposing the existing relations between concepts and classifying concepts; also, with the principles of defining concepts and appraising the existing definitions. Considering the fact that characteristics and functioning of term depend heavily on its lexical surrounding nowadays it is common to view as the main object of terminology science not separate terms, but rather the whole terminology used in some particular field of knowledge (also called subject field). Terminological research started seventy years ago and was especially fruitful at the last forty years. At that time the main types of special lexical units, such as terms proper, nomens, terminoids, prototerms, preterms and quasiterms were singled out and studied. A nomen, or a nomenclature unit, is a name of a single notion or a certain unit of mass production, e.g. prefix dis-; Canon 550D; UA-24; etc. Terminoids, or jargon terms, are special lexical units which are used to name the phenomena that are absolutely new and whose concepts are not interpreted in a monosemantic way. E.g., Salmon Day, mouse potato, etc. Prototerms are special lexemes that appeared and were used in prescientific times. Preterms are a special group of lexemes which is represented by special lexical units used as terms to name new scientific notions. They are represented by a vast descriptive pattern, e.g. business process re-engineering, management by walking about, etc. The main principles of terminological work were elaborated, terminologies of the leading European languages belonging to many subject fields were described and analysed. It should be mentioned that at the former USSR terminological studies were conducted on an especially large scale: while in the 1940s only four terminological dissertations were successfully defended, in the 1950s there were 50 such dissertations, in the 1960s their number reached 231, in the 1970s – 463 and in the 1980s – 1110. As the result of development and specialising of terminological studies, some of the branches of terminology science – such as typological terminology science, semasiological terminology science, terminological derivatology, comparative terminology science, terminography, functional terminology science, cognitive terminology science, historical terminology science and some branch terminology sciences – have gained the status of independent scientific disciplines.
Views: 101 The Audiopedia
Майкл Хаммер заявляє
 
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Помічник державного секретаря США з питань громадських справ Майкл Хаммер заявляє, що основними умовами для визначення подальшої співпраці США та України є звільнення Юлії Тимошенко та проведення прозорих та справедливих виборів до Верховної ради України. 05.10.2012 http://www.tymoshenko.ua/uk/article/yulia_tymoshenko_05_10_2012_01
Alan Greenspan on Economics, Budget and Monetary Policy (1990)
 
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A 1983 cover article in Time magazine, "The New Economy", described the transition from heavy industry to a new technology based economy.[5] By 1997 Newsweek was referring to the "new economy" in many of its articles.[6] After a nearly 25-year period of unprecedented growth, the United States experienced a much discussed economic slowdown beginning in 1972. However, around 1995, U.S. economic growth accelerated, driven by faster productivity growth. From 1972 to 1995, the growth rate of output per hour, a measure of labor productivity, had only averaged around one-percent per year. But by the mid '90s, growth became much faster: 2.65 percent from 1995–1999.[7] America also experienced increased employment and decreasing inflation. The economist Robert J. Gordon referred to this as a Goldilocks economy-the result of five positive "shocks" – "the two traditional shocks (food-energy and imports) and the three new shocks (computers, medical care, and measurement)"[8] Other economists pointed to the ripening benefits of the computer age, being realized after a delay much like that associated to the delayed benefits of electricity shortly after the turn of the twentieth century. Gordon contended in 2000 that the benefits of computers were marginal or even negative for the majority of firms, with their benefits being consolidated in the computer hardware and durable goods manufacturing sectors, which only represent a relatively small segment of the economy. His method relied on applying considerably sized gains in the business cycle to explain aggregate productivity growth.[9] According to another point of view, the "new economy" is a current Kondratiev wave which will end after a 50-year period in the 2040s. Its innovative basis includes Internet, nanotechnologies, telematics and bionics. In the financial markets, the term has been associated with the Dot-com bubble. This included the emergence of the NASDAQ as a rival to the New York Stock Exchange, a high rate of IPOs, the rise of Dot-com stocks over established firms, and the prevalent use of such tools as stock options. In the wider economy the term has been associated with practices such as outsourcing, business process outsourcing and business process re-engineering. At the same time, there was a lot of investment in the companies of the technology sector. Stock shares rose dramatically. A lot of start-ups were created and the stock value was very high where floated. Newspapers and business leaders were starting to talk of new business models. Some even claimed that the old laws of economics did not apply anymore and that new laws had taken their place. They also claimed that the improvements in computer hardware and software would dramatically change the future, and that information is the most important value in the new economy. Some, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Blake Belding, have suggested that a lot of investment in information technology, especially in software and unused fibre optics, was useless. However, this may be too harsh a judgment, given that U.S. investment in information technology has remained relatively strong since 2002. While there may have been some overinvestment, productivity research shows that much of the investment has been useful in raising output. The recession of 2001 disproved many of the more extreme predictions made during the boom years, and gave credence to Gordon's minimization of computers' contributions. However, subsequent research strongly suggests that productivity growth has been stimulated by heavy investment in information and communication technology. Furthermore, strong productivity growth after the 2001 recession makes it likely that many of the gains of the late 1990s may endure. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_economy
Views: 78 Way Back
Agrohack 2017: Panel -  "Impact of Biotechnology"
 
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During the 2017 Agrohack Conference, the panel discusses how initiatives developed by biotech companies are transforming the world of agriculture. Lucy Crespo, CEO of the Puerto Rico Science, Technology and Research Trust, has ample experience in the tech industry in areas such as new products, R&D, manufacturing management, strategic business planning, business process reengineering and IT service delivery operations. She retired as general manager of Hewlett-Packard Puerto Rico’ enterprise business division after 31 years. She also managed Unix’s Latin American operations including sales, marketing and customer experience. She is a former president of the PRMA and member of the Manufacturing Advisory Board. Dr. Esbal Jiménez Cabán is Associate Dean and Subdirector of the Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez Campus. AGROHACK is a premier agriculture innovation summit whose purpose is to propel agriculture as a sustainable source of growth and economic development.
Myndbend Process Manager Overview
 
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Myndbend Process Manager™ provides an easy, convenient and flexible way for agents to build custom processes in Zendesk. Learn more: http://www.helpdeskapps.com/hc/en-us/articles/201093958
Industry Perspective & The Future of Agile Panel - 2013 The Path to Agility Conference
 
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Hear from a panel of featured speakers on the current industry trends and discuss where the Agile movement is headed over the next few years. Facilitator -- Bart Murphy Bart Murphy is the Chief Technology Officer of the CareWorks Family of Companies and President of CareWorks Tech. He has over 16 years of management and consulting experience. Throughout his career, he has performed many roles including Shared Services Executive, Delivery Executive, Engagement Manager, Program Manager, Project Manager, Project Lead, Business Analyst, Developer, and Test Analyst. He specializes in Agile delivery execution and management, implementing solutions on a variety of initiatives, from software implementations to business process re-engineering and organizational change. He serves on the board of the Central Ohio Agile Association, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the use of Agile practices and principles in project management, software development, quality assurance, and business analysis with an emphasis on solution delivery. Panelists Christopher Avery is a sought-after, international speaker, author, and business advisor on responsible leadership, teamwork, and change for companies like GAP, Wells Fargo, and Ebay. Known for his cutting-edge work to demystify and then develop practical team leadership skills for engineers and other technical professionals, Christopher wrote the popular classic Teamwork Is An Individual Skill for everyone who is fed up with working in bad teams. Fortune magazine called it the only book on teamwork you need to read. As the visionary force behind the worldwide Leadership Gift community, Christopher applies groundbreaking discoveries about personal responsibility and performance to support leaders intent on rapidly building highly reliable, agile, sustainable, and accelerating teams and cultures. Christopher is president of Partnerwerks Inc., the company he co-founded in 1991 to document best practices for collaborating under competitive conditions. He is an agile coach with Rally Software, teaching Scrum and Product Owner workshops. Christopher is also a Senior Consultant with the IT and Agile Project Management practices of the Cutter Consortium, a Boston-area think tank. He co-authored the Declaration of Interdependence and co-founded the Agile Project Leadership Network dedicated to connecting, developing, and supporting great project leaders. Ellen Gottesdiener is Founder and Principal with EBG Consulting, experts helping you deliver high-value products your customers want and need. Ellen is an internationally recognized facilitator, coach, trainer, speaker, and expert in agile product management practices, product envisioning and roadmapping, business analysis and requirements, retrospectives and collaboration. Ellen works with global clients and speaks at numerous industry conferences. Author of two acclaimed books—Requirements by Collaboration and The Software Requirements Memory Jogger—Ellen is co-authoring a book with Mary Gorman on practical agile planning and analysis practices available in August 2012. View her articles, tweets, blog, free eNewsletter, and useful practitioner resources on EBG's web site. As managing partner at QSM Associates Inc., Michael Mah teaches, writes, and consults to technology companies on measuring, estimating and managing software projects, whether in-house, offshore, waterfall, or agile. He is the director of the Benchmarking Practice at the Cutter Consortium, a Boston-based IT think-tank, and served as past editor of the IT Metrics Strategies publication. With over 25 years of experience, Michael and his partners at QSM have derived productivity patterns for thousands of projects collected in its worldwide database across engineering and business applications. His work examines time-pressure dynamics of teams, and its role in project success and failure. QSM is the creator of the SLIM® model, a suite of tools for software release planning, measurement, and estimation. Michael can be reached at www.qsma.com. Ken Schwaber is a co-founder of the worldwide Agile software movement and co-creator, with Jeff Sutherland, of the Scrum technique for building software in 30 days. Ken was a signatory to the Agile Manifesto in 2001, and helped to found the Agile Alliance and Scrum Alliance. He is now president of Scrum.org, a software consulting firm headquartered in Boston, and the author of many seminal books and articles. The most recent, with Jeff Sutherland, is "Software in 30 Days: How Agile Managers Beat the Odds, Delight their Customers, and Leave Competitors in the Dust." When it comes to the profession of software development, he has more than 40 years experience from hacked to procedural to object, from bottle-washer to cook.
Views: 286 cohaaorg
Why Were the 1990s So Prosperous? Alan Greenspan on Financial Markets, Economy (1998)
 
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The new economy is the result of the transition from a manufacturing-based economy to a service-based economy. This particular use of the term was popular during the dot-com bubble of the late 1990s. The high growth, low inflation and high employment of this period led to overly optimistic predictions and many flawed business plans. A 1983 cover article in Time magazine, "The New Economy", described the transition from heavy industry to a new technology based economy. By 1997 Newsweek was referring to the "new economy" in many of its articles. After a nearly 25-year period of unprecedented growth, the United States experienced a much discussed economic slowdown beginning in 1972. However, around 1995, U.S. economic growth accelerated, driven by faster productivity growth. From 1972 to 1995, the growth rate of output per hour, a measure of labor productivity, had only averaged around one-percent per year. But by the mid '90s, growth became much faster: 2.65 percent from 1995–1999. America also experienced increased employment and decreasing inflation. The economist Robert J. Gordon referred to this as a Goldilocks economy-the result of five positive "shocks" – "the two traditional shocks (food-energy and imports) and the three new shocks (computers, medical care, and measurement)." Other economists pointed to the ripening benefits of the computer age, being realized after a delay much like that associated to the delayed benefits of electricity shortly after the turn of the twentieth century. Gordon contended in 2000 that the benefits of computers were marginal or even negative for the majority of firms, with their benefits being consolidated in the computer hardware and durable goods manufacturing sectors, which only represent a relatively small segment of the economy. His method relied on applying considerably sized gains in the business cycle to explain aggregate productivity growth.[9] According to another point of view, the "new economy" is a current Kondratiev wave which will end after a 50-year period in the 2040s. Its innovative basis includes Internet, nanotechnologies, telematics and bionics. In the financial markets, the term has been associated with the Dot-com bubble. This included the emergence of the NASDAQ as a rival to the New York Stock Exchange, a high rate of IPOs, the rise of Dot-com stocks over established firms, and the prevalent use of such tools as stock options. In the wider economy the term has been associated with practices such as outsourcing, business process outsourcing and business process re-engineering. At the same time, there was a lot of investment in the companies of the technology sector. Stock shares rose dramatically. A lot of start-ups were created and the stock value was very high where floated. Newspapers and business leaders were starting to talk of new business models. Some even claimed that the old laws of economics did not apply anymore and that new laws had taken their place. They also claimed that the improvements in computer hardware and software would dramatically change the future, and that information is the most important value in the new economy. Some, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Blake Belding, have suggested that a lot of investment in information technology, especially in software and unused fibre optics, was useless. However, this may be too harsh a judgment, given that U.S. investment in information technology has remained relatively strong since 2002. While there may have been some overinvestment, productivity research shows that much of the investment has been useful in raising output. The recession of 2001 disproved many of the more extreme predictions made during the boom years, and gave credence to Gordon's minimization of computers' contributions. However, subsequent research strongly suggests that productivity growth has been stimulated by heavy investment in information and communication technology. Furthermore, strong productivity growth after the 2001 recession makes it likely that many of the gains of the late 1990s may endure. "The most successful companies in the new economy will be mutants and hybrids that can combine different kinds of know-how", according to Charles Leadbeater. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_economy
Views: 741 Way Back
How Can I Make a Business Case for Lean Six Sigma Blended Learning at My Organization?
 
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Watch the full interview: http://www.isixsigma.com/training/e-learning-articles/lean-six-sigma-blended-learning/ Michael: Anything else that professionals at organizations need to know to make a case for blended learning at their organization? John: Well, I think it goes down to your return on investment. You need that to be very fast and very measurable. And I think the Department of Defense is a real good example. They had a measurable increase in the speed and the impact of their Green Belt training in the projects that were completed and in how well those projects were coming together. I had the opportunity to conduct a Black Belt-level class for a marketing organization; and they sent sixteen people to class that were divided into four teams. And they came in with actual projects that were predefined by their manager. And we were able to customize the class to meet their specific needs as marketing people -- a little heavier on the Lean; a little less on the statistics. And we did the class in about half the classroom hours; and I think the significant thing there is they actually used the projects as their classroom activities. And so, by the time we got to the end of the class, one of the projects was almost completed; the others were very close behind. And it was probably one of the most successful classes I had done because everybody came in at the same level, everybody had a very clear project to work on, and we were able to work on those actual projects right there in class. We had another real good experience with a casino, where we taught the class right on the casino floor. And we worked on maintenance problems that they were running into there. And so, everybody got out there. We had some people that had statistics in college. We heard people that could not even pronounce the 's' word. And so, once they got out there, though, they at least were at the same level and were able to participate very quickly. So, blended learning works. Done right, it works very well.
Views: 272 iSixSigma
Business process
 
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A business process or business method is a collection of related, structured activities or tasks that produce a specific service or product (serve a particular goal) for a particular customer or customers. It can often be visualized with a flowchart as a sequence of activities with interleaving decision points or with a Process Matrix as a sequence of activities with relevance rules based on data in the process. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 16 Audiopedia
Scholar Talks - Laurel Ofstein
 
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Business Incubator and Entrepreneurial Intentions Dr. Laurel Ofstein, assistant professor of management at Western Michigan University, completed her Ph.D. in business administration at the University of Illinois at Chicago with a focus on entrepreneurship. She also holds an M.B.A. from DePaul University in Chicago. Her research focuses on how entrepreneurs innovate, as well as factors that drive individual entrepreneurial intentions and behaviors. She has most recently published articles on how learned creativity skills support innovative outcomes, as well as about the influences of organizational climate on innovation. At WMU, she teaches courses on entrepreneurship, family business and strategy.
Virtual customer environment  (VCE)
 
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Virtual customer environment (VCE) --was proposed by Satish and Priya Nambisan in a 2008 Harvard business review article suggest that market winners have succeeded in part due to the fact that they have built such strong links with customers through the development of innovative customer forums that have brought customers into the process of product development and the creation of perceived value. These forums are virtual in nature and range from such activities as online discussions to product development innovation centres. In these situations the customers are linked to new product development, and the feelings of ownership and involvement that come with these connections, further enhance customer relationships with the company. Created at http://www.b2bwhiteboard.com
Views: 368 B2Bwhiteboard
KPC  Change Management - avoid passive resistance
 
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KPC Mental Tech BU7 Change Management
Views: 50 KPC Mental Tech
Process Specification Language
 
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The Process Specification Language is a set of logic terms used to describe processes. The logic terms are specified in an ontology that provides a formal description of the components and their relationships that make up a process. The ontology was developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and has been approved as an international standard in the document ISO 18629. The Process Specification Language can be used for the representation of manufacturing, engineering and business processes, including production scheduling, process planning, workflow management, business process reengineering, simulation, process realization, process modelling, and project management. In the manufacturing domain, PSL’s objective is to serve as a common representation for integrating several process-related applications throughout the manufacturing process life cycle. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 789 Audiopedia
Law Schools in the 21st Century (CALIcon 2000 Friday Plenary)
 
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From the 2000 CALI Conference for Law School Computing Can concepts such as reengineering that were developed in industry and commerce be helpful in understanding the challenges now facing legal education, or is the current media buzz surrounding e-business just more hype that obscures more than it illucidates? I will argue that not only can they be helpful, they may be inescapable if law schools are to retain their current autonomy and public purpose in the face of increasing pressures from proprietary competitors. While the core objectives of legal education may be rooted in the pursuit of justice and the perservation of professional autonomy, the actual administration and delivery of legal education is a process which might benefit from a healthy dose of "reengineering" in the same manner that many sectors of the economy are being transformed today. Reengineering requires a focus on improving the quality of the relationship between the institution and its stakeholder constituiencies and a willingess to abandon the security of existing institutional categories and processes. Advances in information technology are creating new opportunities to distribute information about law to the public, to the bar and to law students. In order to deliver the greatest possible improvement in understanding the law, legal educators need to examine critically what competence in knowledge of law and legal reasoning consists of, how such competence could be imparted most efficiently using technologies available today, and how responsibilities and resources within law schools may have to be reallocated and redefined. Instead of focusing on the external features of the present system, such as the Socratic method, the standard JD curriculum or tenure for faculty members, educators need to focus on how the core missions of law schools can be achieved more effectively in light of new technology. Profiling and data warehousing is a good example of a technology that was developed for commercial electronic commerce applications, but that might help transform legal education. If law students increasingly interact with faculty and access their assigned course materials online, then those online interactions can be used to build datawarehouses describing law student learning behaviors. By profiling those behaviors, law schools can develop objective profiles of student learning and correlate those profiles with different models of competence: in law school exams, in bar exams, in post-law school employment. If the information gathered from such profiling were used to refine the development of course content, not only could law student learning could be more effective, but the continuing education of attorneys and public knowledge of law could likewise be improved. If law schools collaborate on building databases and sharing their analyses of that data, all those wishing to learn the law might be aided. Linking the actual identity of students with the information contained in profiles raises serious privacy issues that would have to be scrutinized carefully by legal educators. If electronic course content and the profiles of students using that content are developed by for-profit ventures, however, it is unclear whether student privacy rights would be defended or the public interest in greater knowledge of law would be pursued vigorously. The article on which Nicolas Terry's speech was based, Bricks plus Bytes: How �Click-and-Brick� Will Define Legal Education Space, (forthcoming 46(1) Villanova Law Review, Spring 2001) is now available from SSRN. Jane Kaufman Winn Associate Professor Southern Methodist University School of Law Dallas TX 75275-0116 Nicolas P. Terry Professor of Law and Co-Director, Center for Health Law Studies Saint Louis University School of Law
Views: 142 caliorg
WHAT IS EAN | BAR CODING | EAN IN HINDI | EUROPEAN ARTICLE NUMBERING
 
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WHAT IS EAN ? FULL DESCRIPTION? IMPORTANT FOR BCA STUDENTS ...MUST WATCH AND PLEASE LIKE AND SUBSCRIBE.
Views: 1132 rohit ranjan
IT Performance Measurement using IT Governance Metric
 
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Using IT Governance as a tool for measuring IT performance. COBIT 5 has provided generic metrics at strategic levels [Enterprise metrics], Tactical level [IT Goals metrics] and Operation Level [Process metrics]. We will highlight the benefits and objectives of the measurements, and then provide an approach along with suggestions on the time/frequency of measurement. This webinar covers the following: • An Overview of IT Governance • Why and What to measure – Benefits and Objectives • How and When to measure – Approach and Schedule Presenter: Oladapo Ogundeji's professional career extends over 18 years of experience focused on enhancing the strategic value of ICT in organizations through process re-engineering, strategic planning and project management for corporate objective & strategy that address business opportunities and issues. Organizer: Erita Rexhepi Date: September 26, 2016 Slides of the webinar: http://www.slideshare.net/PECBCERTIFICATION/it-performance-measurement-using-it-governance-metric ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Find out more about ISO/IEC 20000, ISO 27001, and ISO 25001 standards: Training: https://pecb.com/iso-iec-20000-training-courses Webinars: https://pecb.com/webinars Article: https://pecb.com/article/adapting-itil-and-implementing-isoiec-20000-for-a-successful-organizationbusiness Whitepaper: https://pecb.com/whitepaper/isoiec-200002011---service-management-system-requirements ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more information about PECB: Website: https://pecb.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/pecb/ Google +: https://plus.google.com/+PECBGroup Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PECBInternational/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/PECBGroup Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/PECBCERTIFICATION
Views: 941 PECB
What is VIRTUAL BUSINESS MODEL? What does VIRTUAL BUSINESS MODEL mean?
 
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What is VIRTUAL BUSINESS MODEL? What does VIRTUAL BUSINESS MODEL mean? VIRTUAL BUSINESS MODEL meaning - VIRTUAL BUSINESS MODEL definition - VIRTUAL BUSINESS MODEL explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Virtual business model (not to be confused with Virtual business), is a way to organize an innovative startup company and facilitates increased flexibility in the use of both financial and human resources and can promote development of new ideas and inventions. In the virtual company, the utilization of the financial resources can be optimized with cost-effective product development as a result. This business model is defined using several criteria; the company has a limited number of employees; the management has competence for product and business development; the company has financial resources to perform or has the ambition to find such financial resources; the company has a defined plan for the use of the financial resources; the majority of the operations are performed at organizations (called External Resources Provider) outside the Virtual Company; the ownership of the created value (e.g. technical results, patents) developed by the external resources providers belongs to the virtual company. After the foundation of the virtual company and the development of the business using external resources providers, the company can continue to use the virtual company format for continued product development or after some time the company can transform the business to a traditional integrated company.
Views: 113 The Audiopedia
Overcoming resistance to change: Technical problems vs. Adaptive challenges
 
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In a highly complex health and care system, we often face resistance from others when trying to implement change. Technical solutions to problems, whilst easy to identify, do not always allow us to overcome this complexity, and therefore do not enable us to make the improvements that we want to see. Professor Stephen Singleton describes how leaders can think about challenges 'adaptively', overcome resistance, and create positive change for the benefit of the people who use our services. Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA)! To find out more, check out the Cumbria Production System Toolkit: http://www.theclic.org.uk/cumbria-production-system/toolkit-2/summary/module-1/1-1-plan-do-study-act
DARPAN Project
 
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Darpan Launched For Financial Inclusion Of Rural Population The Minister of Communications Shri Manoj Sinha today launched DARPAN – “Digital Advancement of Rural Post Office for A New India” Project to improve the quality of service, add value to services and achieve “financial inclusion” of un-banked rural population. He said, the goal of the IT modernization project with an outlay of Rs. 1400 Crore is to provide a low power technology solution to each Branch Postmaster (BPM) which will enable each of approximately 1.29 Lakhs Branch Post Offices (BOs) to improve the level of services being offered to rural customers across all the states. Shri Sinha said that as on date, 43,171 Branch Post Offices have migrated under the “DARPAN”projectwith the aim of financial inclusion to rural population and it is targeted to complete the project by March, 2018. The Project shall increase the rural reach of the Department of Posts and enable BOs to increase traffic of all financial remittances, savings accounts, Rural Postal Life Insurance, and Cash Certificates; improve mail operations processes by allowing for automated booking and delivery of accountable article; increase revenue using retail post business; provide third party applications; and make disbursements for social security schemes such as MGNREGS. As part of IT modernization project, the Department of Posts (DoP) has carried out business process reengineering across various functional areas and has created To-Be processes that will enable it to achieve these objectives. As an achievement, Department of Posts has established 991 ATMs across the country, which are interoperable with other banks and the common people has directly benefited with the wide network of Department of Posts especially in rural areas. Till now, 1,12,85,217 transactions have been carried out on the DOP’s ATMs out of which 70,24,214 transactions have been done by the non-DOP customers. Department of Posts is the only Government player in this space. For more than 150 years, the Department of Posts (DoP) has been the backbone of the country’s communication and has played a crucial role in the country’s socio-economic development. It touches the lives of Indian citizens in many ways: delivering mails, accepting deposits under Small Savings Schemes, providing life insurance cover under Postal Life Insurance (PLI) and Rural Postal Life Insurance (RPLI) and providing retail services like bill collection, sale of forms, etc. The Department of Posts also acts as an agent for Government of India in discharging other services for citizens such as Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) wage disbursement and old age pension payments. With 1.5 lakh Post Offices (approximately), the Department of Posts has the most widely distributed postal network in the world. Trends such as urbanization, increased demand for financial services, increased funding by the government for the weaker sections and the rural sector, have opened up new opportunities for the Department of Posts,which in turn has necessitated development of new processes and supporting technology. The Department of Posts is also faced with twin challenges of increasing competition and continuing advances in communication technology, especially in mobile telephony and the Internet. In order to provide the best-in-class customer service, deliver new services and improve operational efficiencies,the Department of Posts has undertaken an end to end IT modernization project to equip itself with requisite modern tools and technologies. The IT modernization project intends to achieve the following: 1. Wider reach to the Indian populace through more customer interaction channels 2. Better customer service III. Growth through new lines of business 1. IT enablement of business processes and support functions
Views: 2464 examandyou