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Chemistry: What is a Covalent Bond? (Polar and Nonpolar)
 
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Chemistry: What is a Covalent Bond? (Polar and Nonpolar) Covalent bonds are one of the 3 main types of intramolecular forces, along with ionic bonds and metallic bonds. Covalent bonds are the result of atoms sharing their valence electrons. Covalent bonds can be polar or nonpolar, depending on the electronegativies of the atoms involved in the bond. We show five examples of covalent bonds using Lewis dot structure notation: HF, CO2, H2, H2O and CCl4. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:28 Definition of a Covalent Bond 0:42 Example 1: HF (single covalent bond) 1:23 Example 2: CO2 (double covalent bond) 2:09 Nonpolar covalent bonds 2:20 Example 3: H2 2:43 Polar covalent bonds 2:48 Example 4: H2O 3:58 Example 5: CCl4 4:39 Pauling Bond Polarity Scale (Linus Pauling) 5:15 Do covalent bonds break apart in water? (electrolytes) Click to watch our video about ionic bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Click to see our video about metallic bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ And here's our video comparing ionic and covalent bonds: http://bit.ly/1Nz4Kpy Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Essential Chemistry Lessons help all year long: What is a Mole? Avogadro's Number: http://bit.ly/2laJh0S Molar Mass: http://bit.ly/2pNfg8L Scientific Notation: http://bit.ly/2cv6yTw Significant Figures: http://bit.ly/2b1g3aJ Unit Conversion 1: http://bit.ly/1YGOQgw Unit Conversion 2: http://bit.ly/1RGbwZ1 Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/2gmSWfe ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios.
Views: 183827 Socratica
Covalent Bonding! (Definition and Examples)
 
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Covalent bonding is one of the two main types of bonding. Because it’s about sharing electrons, most of the time atoms involved in covalent bonding will have no charges. FREE Practice Problems! 🍏 http://robinreaction.com LET ME be your online tutor! 🍎 https://www.robinreaction.com/tutoring Need more help? Check out some of my playlists! My Bonding Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4-ljSnCA78&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhxT0RePkb2hibgOw5vZ0CMp My Science Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdYiEKh_P4M&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhyFIgXQOm8dv_dhtgRjFeSn Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRdkQ6SFhQw&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhwMrShxFJrMSulAH8IF1_Ej My Balancing Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9J3LzWGlaQ&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhx6zKa8lEkqTkR8jnCim31i My Mole Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEQNjXAQQg4&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhztE2CmvAVBe34knNYAKiJh My Naming Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4u1DEFPBJk&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhx-HqP7JWvT9knG1jjwqz4D 🍉 Subscribe to my channel! 🍉 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN2sk9BZ-f5GaiTK-fGDByQ?sub_confirmation=1 I'm Robin Reaction! My goal is to help you understand chemistry by breaking down difficult concepts into pieces you can understand. I've taught thousands of students and no matter how much you're struggling, I promise you can learn this stuff if you dedicate yourself to learning it and get help from the right people!
Views: 8825 Robin Reaction
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1434732 It's AumSum Time
Introduction to Ionic Bonding and Covalent Bonding
 
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This crash course chemistry video tutorial explains the main concepts between ionic bonds found in ionic compounds and polar & nonpolar covalent bonding found in molecular compounds. This video contains plenty of notes, examples, and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Ionic Bonds - Transfer of Valence Electrons 2. Electrostatic Force of Attraction In Ionic Bonding 3. Ionic Compounds - Metals and Nonmetals 4. Molecular Compounds - 2 or More Nonmetals 5. Polar Covalent Bonding - Unequal Sharing of Electrons 6. Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Equal Sharing of Electrons 7. Polarized Compounds - Dipole Moment and Charge Separation 8. Electronegativity and Charge Distribution 9. Metal Cations vs Nonmetal Anions
Covalent Bond
 
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Views: 95716 DeltaStep
Covalent Bond Examples: Several Examples of Covalent (molecular) Bonds
 
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A description, with examples, of how to tell if a compound consists of covalent bonds. The primary way of telling if a bond is covalent is to check and see if the elements that make up the compound are non-metals. Covalent compounds consist of bonds between two or more non-metals. To determine if the atoms in a chemical compound are metals or non-metals we use the Periodic Table. In the Periodic Table in the video the non-metals are colored light green. Examples of covalent bonds are CH4, HCl, NO2, CO2, and O2. Other examples of covalent bonds are presented in the video.
Views: 7053 Wayne Breslyn
Ionic   covalent compounds All examples
 
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Ionic compounds, covalent compounds All examples, difference between ionic and covalent compounds
Views: 124 rajwin656
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2336898 Khan Academy
How to Draw Covalent Bonding Molecules
 
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http://www.sciencetutorial4u.com This video explains how to draw covalent molecules and compounds. Contents: 0:08 Introduction 0:39 H2 1:25 HCl 2:23 Cl2 3:18 CH4 4:27 NH3 5:37 H2O 6:52 O2 7:57 N2 Thank you for watching. Please like, subscribe and share this video: https://youtu.be/_v8C1W0ChVM INTRODUCTION 0:08 Covalent bonding happens between non-metals. The electrons are shared between the non-metal atoms. This bonding allow atoms to have full outer shell of electrons. Only the electrons in the outer shell take part in the bonding. The number of electrons in the outer shell can be found out using the group in the periodic table. H2 0:39 Hydrogen is in group 1 so it has one electron in the outer shell. Hydrogen molecules have single bond which means they have two electrons in the overlap. HCl 1:25 Chlorine is in group 7 so it has seven electrons in the outer shell. HCl has single bond so it has two electrons in the overlap. Cl2 2:23 Chlorine is in group 7 so it has seven electrons in the outer shell. Cl2 (Chlorine molecule) has single bond so it has two electrons in the overlap. CH4 3:18 Carbon is in group 4 so it has four electrons in the outer shell. Methane has four single bonds. NH3 4:27 Nitrogen is found in group 5 so it has 5 electrons in the outer-shell. The Nitrogen atom is surrounded by three Hydrogen atoms, each providing one electron in the sharing (overlap). So Ammonia has 3 single bonds. H2O 5:37 Oxygen is found in group 6 so it has 6 electrons in the outer shell. Water has 2 single bonds. O2 6:52 Oxygen molecules have double bonds. Oxygen atom is found in group 6 so it has 6 electron in the outer shell. Therefore, in the overlap there are 2 pairs of electrons (which is 4 electrons in the overlap). This leads O2 molecules to have one double bond. N2 7:57 Nitrogen molecules have triple bonds. Nitrogen is found in group 5 so it has 5 electrons in the outer-shell. In the overlap, there are 3 pairs of electrons which are 6 electrons in the overlap. This causes Nitrogen molecules to have one triple bond. How to draw Ionic Bonds Teaching Video: https://youtu.be/ek-AN5K3AlI Ionic and Covalent bonds Teaching video: https://youtu.be/wQ3NJUKKcTU How to draw electron shell Teaching video: https://youtu.be/vuVNkQwSggo
Views: 69902 sciencetutorial4u
Chemical Bonding | Covalent Bond | Ionic Bonding | Class 11 Chemistry
 
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A chemical bond is a lasting attraction between atoms, ions or molecules that enables the formation of chemical compounds. The bond may result from the electrostatic force of attraction between oppositely charged ions as in ionic bonds or through the sharing of electrons as in covalent bonds.
Views: 11802 Creative Learning
Covalent Bonding Explanation
 
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Simple Covalent Bonding Explanation with Lewis Dot Diagrams.
Views: 128547 MrHren
Polar Covalent Bonds
 
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Polar covalent bonds result from eneven sharing of electrons. Learn how to predict if a bond will be polar or nonpolar in this video.
Views: 156217 The Science Classroom
Chemical Bonding Covalent Bonds and Ionic Bonds
 
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Chemical Bonding Covalent Bonds and Ionic Bonds. Mr. Causey discusses ionic bonds, covalent bonds and chemical bonding. You need to know the periodic table, valence electrons, lewis dot symbols, oxidation numbers and electronegativity in order to determine chemicals bonds. http://www.yourCHEMcoach.com Subscribe for more chemistry videos: http://bit.ly/1jeutVl Basic Rules - 0:56 Valence Electrons - 1:10 Electronegativity - 1:18 Chemical Bonding - 1:46 Ionic Bond - 2:58 Covalent Bond - 4:00 Compound Characteristics - 6:26 Name that Bond - 7:50 Thinking Time - 8:57 Share this Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjoQHqgzda8 Resources: Polyatomic Ion Cheat Sheet: http://bit.ly/14e2pbw Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/ptable9 Related Videos: Related Videos: Naming Ionic and Covalent Compounds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XUsOLaz3zY Metallic Bonding: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uNETGK_sb4 Molecular Geometry: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pq2wum1uDc Intermolecular Forces: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYZg1j7o2x4 Contact Me: [email protected] Follow Me: http://www.twitter.com/#!/mrcausey http://pinterest.com/mistercausey/ http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=814523544
Views: 287321 Mr. Causey
Polar Covalent Bonds and Nonpolar Covalent bonds, Ionic Bonding - Types of Chemical Bonds
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into the types of chemical bonds such as polar covalent bonds, nonpolar covalent bonds and ionic bonds. It discusses the difference between ionic bonding and covalent bonding. Ionic bonds can be identified by looking for a metal combined with a nonmetal. Covalent bonds typically occur among 2 or more nonmetals. Covalent bonding involves a sharing of electrons and ionic bonding forms as a result of a transfer of electrons from the metal to the nonmetal producing ions with opposite charge which are attracted to each other. The electrostatic force of attraction produces the ionic bond that holds the cations and anions together. Polar covalent bonds have unequal sharing of electrons between the atoms where as nonpolar covalent bonding have a relatively equal sharing of electrons between the atoms attached to the bond. Polar covalent bonds typically have an electronegativity difference of 0.5 or more where as nonpolar covalent bonds have a value difference of 0.4 or less. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Covalent Bonding
 
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Covalent bonds form when nonmetals react with other nonmetals to from chemical compounds. Covalent bonds results from these elements sharing their electrons. Please Like and Subscribe. Learning more science at www.thescienceclassroom.org
Views: 16120 The Science Classroom
Covalent bonding examples
 
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Description
Views: 1896 Mr Campbell Science
Polar and NonPolar Molecules: Animations, Examples, and Practice
 
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Learn to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar based on the polarity between bonds and the molecular geometry (shape). We start with the polarity between bonds using the electronegativity (EN) values on the Periodic Table provided. After that we’ll look at how the shape of the molecule, based on VSEPR, allows us to determine if the entire molecule is polar or nonpolar. In the video you will also learn how to deal with unbonded electron pairs (lone) and how it affects the symmetry and polarity of molecules. To help you learn and retain knowledge practice problems, with solutions, are provided throughout the video. Contents: - Finding is a bond between two atoms is polar or nonpolar. - Practice. - Finding is molecules are symmetrical and how this impacts polarity. - Practice. - The role of unbonded electron pairs on molecular shape and polarity. - Practice - Wrap up on polar and nonpolar molecules. Get more chemistry help at http://www.thegeoexchange.org/chemistry/bonding Molecular Shapes done with PhET's free online website: https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/html/molecule-shapes/latest/molecule-shapes_en.html Drawing/writing done in InkScape. Screen capture done with Camtasia Studio 4.0. Done on a Dell Dimension laptop computer with a Wacom digital tablet (Bamboo).
Views: 44712 Wayne Breslyn
The Chemical Bond: Covalent vs. Ionic and Polar vs. Nonpolar
 
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Ionic Bond, Covalent Bond, James Bond, so many bonds! What dictates which kind of bond will form? Electronegativity values, of course. Let's go through each type and what they're all about. To support this channel and keep up on STEM news at the same time, click on the link below and subscribe to this FREE newsletter: http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-9021241-13591026 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 285095 Professor Dave Explains
Covalent Bonding of Hydrogen, Oxygen & Nitrogen | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen as a part of the overall topic of properties of matter. The noble gas structure and covalent bonding is also discussed. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1784176 CrashCourse
What Are Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about covalent bonds, when learning about properties of matter. When similar atoms react, like non-metals combining with other non-metals, they share electrons. This is covalent bonding. Non-metals have shells of electrons that are normally half or more than half full of electrons. Since they have a strong attraction for a few additional electrons, it is energetically unfavourable for any of them to lose electrons, so they share electrons by overlapping orbitals. This makes a bonding orbital, or covalent bond, that contains two or more electrons. Covalent bonds can be represented by a dot and cross diagram. These diagrams show only the valence electrons. Covalent bonds are directional, which means they are in a fixed position. The overlap between orbitals mean that the atoms in covalent bonds are very close, and make covalent bonds strong. There are two kinds of covalent structure - small molecules, like water, and giant compounds, like diamond. The electrons in the bonds are evenly shared, which means the bonds are not polarised; there is little attraction between molecules, and forces between molecules are weak. Compounds made from small covalent molecules have low melting and boiling points and are volatile. They also don’t conduct electricity. Carbon and silicon tend to form giant covalent compounds. These bond in the same way, but instead of forming small molecules with one or two bonds, they form four, make up huge lattices or chains of many many linked up atoms. Diamond is a common example, and is made up of Carbon. These compounds have very high melting and boiling points because you have to break covalent bonds rather than intermolecular forces to make them free enough to act like liquids or gases. The covalent bonds hold them rigidly in place in the giant lattice. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What is a Coordinate Covalent Bond?
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into coordinate covalent bond. Line any covalent bond, electrons are shared. However, in a coordinate covalent bond, one atom donates both electrons that contribute to the formation of the bond. A lewis acid lewis base reaction can form a coordinate covalent bond as well as metal ligand interactions. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Chemical Bonding - Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds
 
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This two minute animation describes the Octet Rule and explains the difference between ionic and covalent bonds. Find more free tutorials, videos and readings for the science classroom at ricochetscience.com
Views: 268070 RicochetScience
Ionic Bonding Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
Views: 1073953 Tyler DeWitt
Naming Covalent Molecular Compounds
 
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We'll learn how to write names for compounds that are made of two nonmetals, sometimes called binary compounds. Binary compounds made of two nonmetals are called covalent or molecular because the elements are held together with covalent bonds, and they make molecules. In order to name them, we use the element name for the first element in the chemical formula, and then we use the -ide name for the second name in the chemical formula. Greek prefixes to show the number of atoms of each element, and these are put in front of the element names.
Views: 724794 Tyler DeWitt
What are Covalent Bonds? - CBSE 10
 
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Carbon is very verastile. It can readily form Bonds with several other elements. But what helps it form so many bonds? How is it capable of Bond Formation with so many elements? Watch this video to understand the Bond formation strategies of Carbon. To access all videos related to Chemistry of Carbon compounds for free, visit our website here: https://DontMemorise.com/course/index.php?categoryid=54 Don’t Memorise brings learning to life through its captivating FREE educational videos. To Know More, visit https://DontMemorise.com New videos every week. To stay updated, subscribe to our YouTube channel : http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseYouTube Register on our website to gain access to all videos and quizzes: http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseRegister Subscribe to our Newsletter: http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseNewsLetter Join us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseFacebook Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dontmemorise Follow us : http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseBlog
Views: 27624 Don't Memorise
Covalent Bonding
 
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019 - Covalent Bonding In this video Paul Andersen explains how covalent bonds form between atoms that are sharing electrons. Atoms that have the same electronegativity create nonpolar covalent bonds. The bond energy and bond length can be determined by graphing the potential energy versus the distance between atoms. Atoms that share electrons unequally form nonpolar covalent bonds. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "Electronegativities of the Elements (data Page)." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, August 10, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Electronegativities_of_the_elements_(data_page)&oldid=565034286. "File:Covalent Bond Hydrogen.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Covalent_bond_hydrogen.svg. "File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg. "File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png. "File:Magnesium Crystals.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Magnesium_crystals.jpg. "File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg. "File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png. "File:Oxygen Molecule.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Oxygen_molecule.png. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Sugar 2xmacro.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sugar_2xmacro.jpg.
Views: 197266 Bozeman Science
Covalent Compounds - Polar and Nonpolar
 
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DeltaStep is a social initiative by graduates of IIM-Ahmedabad, IIM-Bangalore, IIT-Kharagpur, ISI-Kolkata, Columbia University (USA), NTU (Singapore) and other leading institutes. At DeltaStep, we understand that just like every child has a unique face, a unique fingerprint; he has a unique learning ability as well. Hence we have built an intelligent adaptive learning system that delivers a tailor-made learning solution and helps a student to learn at his own pace because when it comes to learning, one size does not fit all. Learn from 1000s of such interesting videos, practice from more than 1,00,000 questions, learn complex concepts through games, take timed tests, get detailed reports & in-depth analysis even via SMS and Whatsapp and many more amazing features. Class wise mapping available for all leading boards including ICSE and CBSE. Create your personal learning account. Register for FREE at www.deltastep.com.
Views: 78808 DeltaStep
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 733891 Tyler DeWitt
Hydrogen Bonds - What Are Hydrogen Bonds - How Do Hydrogen Bonds Form
 
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In this video we discuss hydrogen bonds. We cover how do hydrogen bonds form, the different elements that take part in hydrogen bonds, and why doesn't oil and water mix. What are hydrogen bonds? An attractive force called a hydrogen bond can exist between certain molecules. These bonds are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds, because it takes less energy to break these types of bonds, however, a large number of these bonds going on can exert a strong force. Hydrogen bonds are the result of an unequal charge distribution on a molecule, these molecules are said to be polar. If we look at a water molecule, we can see the oxygen atom shares electrons with 2 different hydrogen atoms. So, in total this molecule has 10 protons, 8 from oxygen and 1 each from the hydrogen atoms, and a total of 10 electrons, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number one, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number 2, and the other 6 non shared electrons from the oxygen atom. So, this water molecule is electrically neutral, but it has a partial positive side, the hydrogen side, and a partial negative side, the oxygen side of the molecule. The electrons are not shared equally within the molecule, as they have a higher probability of being found closer to the nucleus of the oxygen atom, giving that end a slightly negative charge. So, the hydrogen atoms end of the molecule will have a slightly positive charge. These charged ends weakly attach the positive end of one water molecule to the negative end of an adjacent water molecule. When water is in liquid form there a few hydrogen bonds, solid form, many bonds, and when water is steam or gas, there are no bonds, because the molecules are too far apart to form any bonds. Hydrogen bonds only form between hydrogen atoms that are covalently bonded, or bonds where electrons are being shared and not transferred, to an oxygen, nitrogen or fluorine atom. These bonds make water ideal for the chemistry of life. Hydrogen bonds are also important in the structure of proteins and nucleic acids, which we will cover in later videos. So, now we know that water molecules are polar, or have slightly positive and slightly negative ends, and in fact, many lipids, or fats and oils, are not polar. So their molecules share electrons equally in their bonds. So, these are nonpolar molecules. This means that when water and oil come together they do not form bonds with one another. Even when we try to mix them, the water molecules will eventually separate because their polar molecules are attracted to one another and will form hydrogen bonds, separating the water and the nonpolar oil molecules.
Views: 101013 Whats Up Dude
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
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There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 42873 Socratica
Coordinate Bond
 
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DeltaStep is a social initiative by graduates of IIM-Ahmedabad, IIM-Bangalore, IIT-Kharagpur, ISI-Kolkata, Columbia University (USA), NTU (Singapore) and other leading institutes. At DeltaStep, we understand that just like every child has a unique face, a unique fingerprint; he has a unique learning ability as well. Hence we have built an intelligent adaptive learning system that delivers a tailor-made learning solution and helps a student to learn at his own pace because when it comes to learning, one size does not fit all. Learn from 1000s of such interesting videos, practice from more than 1,00,000 questions, learn complex concepts through games, take timed tests, get detailed reports & in-depth analysis even via SMS and Whatsapp and many more amazing features. Class wise mapping available for all leading boards including ICSE and CBSE. Create your personal learning account. Register for FREE at www.deltastep.com.
Views: 169480 DeltaStep
Ionic and Covalent Compounds
 
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DeltaStep is a social initiative by graduates of IIM-Ahmedabad, IIM-Bangalore, IIT-Kharagpur, ISI-Kolkata, Columbia University (USA), NTU (Singapore) and other leading institutes. At DeltaStep, we understand that just like every child has a unique face, a unique fingerprint; he has a unique learning ability as well. Hence we have built an intelligent adaptive learning system that delivers a tailor-made learning solution and helps a student to learn at his own pace because when it comes to learning, one size does not fit all. Learn from 1000s of such interesting videos, practice from more than 1,00,000 questions, learn complex concepts through games, take timed tests, get detailed reports & in-depth analysis even via SMS and Whatsapp and many more amazing features. Class wise mapping available for all leading boards including ICSE and CBSE. Create your personal learning account. Register for FREE at www.deltastep.com.
Views: 19862 DeltaStep
Comparing Ionic & Covalent Compounds
 
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Not Dan shows examples of ionic and covalent compounds and compares them in terms of their physical description, solubility, melting point, and electrical conductivity. Send your questions to [email protected] Follow me on Twitter: @chemistrytalk Music: "Searching" by Smokin' Blue Notes copyright 2014 Roadside Beggars Music used with permission Watch the full music video at: https://youtu.be/jiNrMr43Mbc
Covalent Bonding: H2O
 
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An example of Covalent Bonding with H2O © Copyright
Views: 9315 Annaleigh Tan
Carbon and its Compounds | Bonding in Carbon | Covalent Bonds
 
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CBSE Class 10 Science - Carbon and its Compounds - What is covalent bonding and why Carbon shares electrons? What are Electrovalent and Covalent compounds and difference between them? Atoms can share, gain or Loose electrons to stable their Octates. So the compounds formed by gain or loss of electrons is called as the electrovalent compound and covalent compounds are formed by sharing of electrons. Carbon has an atomic number of 6 and its electronic configuration will be 2 and 4. So to be stale carbon has to either loss 4 electrons or gain 4 electrons. So the carbon shares the electrons with other atoms. So Covalent bonding is mutual sharing of electrons so as to achieve a stable electronic configuration. Hence carbon has co-valency of 4 and will be tetravalent. About PrepOngo: Best Online Learning App which provides CBSE class 10 interactive video lectures, NCERT solutions, written study material, solved examples, in chapter quizzes and practice problems for Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology) and Mathematics. We try to help the students understand lessons by visualising the concepts through illustrative and interactive videos, practice from large question banks and evaluate and improve yourself continuously. Online Live courses are also offered for CBSE boards, JEE Mains, JEE-Advanced, NEET and Board preparation for class 10, 11 and 12 For all CBSE class 10 Science and Maths video lectures download the Android App: https://goo.gl/HJwkhw Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://goo.gl/KSsWP2
Views: 52788 PrepOnGo
Class 10 CHEMICAL BONDING | Ionic /Electrovalent Bonding | Covalent Bonding | Polar and Non Polar |
 
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To support me in my journey you can donate ([email protected] 9161123482) or Alakh Pandey ,Bank of Baroda, Rajrooppur, Allahabad,U.P IFSC: BARB0RAJROO Account No: 19210100020819 A small amount of Rs 100 even will be of great help. Follow us on: Instagram https://www.instagram.com/physicswallah/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/physicswallah Class 10 CHEMICAL BONDING | Ionic /Electrovalent Bonding | Covalent Bonding | Polar and Non Polar https://youtu.be/ZcmzabBVLh8 CoOrDiNaTe BoNdInG : ICSE 10th CHEMISTRy : CHEMICAL BONDING https://youtu.be/PfVHYS3oC_4
Ionic and Covalent Bonds Made Easy
 
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Simple explanation of Ionic and Covalent Bonds music from bensound.com sunny day from soundbible.com wind from soundbible.com
Views: 92379 Got Science?
Co-ordinate Covalent Bond
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, 040-64501777 / 65864777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. Co-ordinate covalent bond (or) Dative bond:The formation of Co-ordinate covalent bond was explained by "Sidwick"Definition: Dative bond is the bond formed by sharing of electron pair but the shared pair is contributed by one atom.Co- ordinate covalent bond is semi polar bond.Characteristics of dative bond:The atom which contributes the electron pair for sharing is called electron pair donor.The donor atom must have at least one pair of electrons in valence shell.An atom which accepts electron pair is called electron pair acceptor. It should have vacant orbital in valence shell.Co-ordinate covalent bond shown by an arrow "→" pointing from donor to acceptor.Let us study the concept with an example.Consider the formation of ammonium ion - NH4 Plus:In Ammonia molecule nitrogen has atomic number 7.The valence shell electronic configuration of nitrogen is 1S2 2S2 2Px1 2Py1 2Pz1.Nitrogen undergoes Sp3 hybridization with one lone pair of electron, one hybrid orbital, other three hybrid orbitals form three .bonds with three hydrogen atoms.In hydrogen ion - 1S vacant orbital is present.Therefore the nitrogen atom has one sp3 orbitals with lone pair which overlaps the vacant 1S orbitals of H+ ion to form co-ordinate covalent bond.Co-ordinate bond is rigid and directional like covalent bond.Properties of compounds with Co-ordinate covalent bond:They are gases or liquids due to weak inter molecular forces.The melting & boiling points of co-ordinate compounds are higher than covalent compounds, but lower than ionic compounds.Co-ordinate compounds are soluble in non polar solvents like benzene and carbon tetrachloride. They are insoluble in polar solvent like water.They are stable as covalent compounds. They undergo molecular reactions which are slow.They exhibit isomerism due to directional nature of bond.Examples: Formation of ammonia boron trifluoride molecule:In ammonia molecule nitrogen atom donates a pair of electrons to the boron fluoride molecule and shares them. A dative bond is formed between them. H3N → BF3
Views: 146347 7activestudio
Polar and NonPolar Molecules: How To Tell If a Molecule is Polar or Nonpolar
 
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This video provides a fast way for you to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar. It provides examples so you can quickly distinguish nonpolar molecules from those that are polar. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of molecules that are classified as polar or nonpolar: N2, O2, Cl2, F2, H2 He, Ne, Ar, Xe CH4, C2H6, CH2=CH2, CF4, SBr6, BH3, CO2, PCl5, H2O, NH3, HF, CH3OH, CH3NH2, CH3COOH OCS, CH3F, SO2
Covalent Network Solids
 
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025 - Covalent Network Solids In this video Paul Andersen explains how covalent network solids form elementally (like graphite) or by combining multiple nonmetals (like quartz). Covalent network solids contain elements from the carbon group because they have four valence electrons and can create three-dimensional shapes. Silicon crystals act as semiconductors and can be either n-type or p-type doped to increase their effectiveness. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Connormah. English: MAde by Me in AICS3, [object HTMLTableCellElement]. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lightning--.svg. "File:80486DX2 200x.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:80486DX2_200x.png. "File:Graphite-layers-side-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Graphite-layers-side-3D-balls.png. "File:GraphiteUSGOV.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:GraphiteUSGOV.jpg. "File:Monokristalines Silizium Für Die Waferherstellung.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Monokristalines_Silizium_f%C3%BCr_die_Waferherstellung.jpg. "File:Pencils Hb.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pencils_hb.jpg. "File:Quartz, Tibet.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, August 17, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Quartz,_Tibet.jpg&oldid=346538517. "File:Silicon-unit-cell-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Silicon-unit-cell-3D-balls.png. "File:Transbauformen.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Transbauformen.jpg. Materialscientist, Diamond_and_graphite jpg: User:Itubderivative work: Diamond and Graphite Samples with Their Respective Structures, 11:37 (UTC). Diamond_and_graphite.jpg. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Diamond_and_graphite2.jpg.
Views: 65915 Bozeman Science
Matric part 1 Chemistry, Co-Ordinate Covelent Bond - Ch 4 - 9th Class Chemistry
 
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ilmkidunya.com has brought to you Lecture of Sibghat Ullah on "9th Class Chemistry Chapter 4 Structure of Molecules. Topic 4.3 Types of Chemical Bond". In this video following sub topics have been taught: - 4.3.3 Co-Ordinate Covelent Bond For more videos of Sibghat Ullah visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study , https://www.instutor.com This lecture is specially recorded for students of 9th class, 9th class from all Punjab Boards and is based on the current curriculum of study for Chemistry book. All these lectures are conducted in Urdu/English medium to facilitate Pakistani students.
Views: 33915 ilmkidunya
Lewis Diagrams Made Easy: How to Draw Lewis Dot Structures
 
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For a limited time get 10% off all my Teespring Merch. Use the promo code: KETZ10 Please consider supporting me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ketzbook This is a Videoscribe tutorial on how to draw Lewis diagrams for elements and simple molecules. Lewis diagrams (aka Lewis structures, Lewis dot structures, Lewis dot diagrams) are useful because they use simple drawings to show how atoms share valence electrons in molecules, polyatomic ions, and other covalent structures. This is my first tutorial in the series. Please also see the second video in my Lewis diagram series: https://youtu.be/qwqXAlvNxsU For simple molecules, follow these 5 steps: 1) count all the valence electrons 2) put the singular atom in the middle 3) draw in single bonds 4) put remaining electrons in as lone pairs 5) give every atom an octet or duet by turning lone pairs into double or triple bonds as needed My goal is to make chemistry easier ;) http://ketzbook.com
Views: 1013035 ketzbook
Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
 
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*** PLEASE WATCH WITH ANNOTATIONS ON! SOME INACCURACIES IN GRAPHICS ARE NOTED AND CORRECTED IN ANNOTATIONS. THANKS! *** Molecules come in infinite varieties, so in order to help the complicated chemical world make a little more sense, we classify and categorize them. One of the most important of those classifications is whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, which describes a kind of symmetry - not just of the molecule, but of the charge. In this edition of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank comes out for Team Polar, and describes why these molecules are so interesting to him. You'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so dang good at fostering life on Earth. -- Table of Contents Charge Assymetry & Geometric Asymmetry 01:33 Difference in Electronegatives 01:49 Hank is Team Polar 00:33 Dipole Moment 03:49 Charge Separation of a Molecule 04:12 Like Dissolves Like 04:41 Water is Awesome 05:10 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2480552 CrashCourse
What Are Giant Chemical Structures  | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about the differences between different chemical structures, including giant covalent, giant ionic and metallic structures. There are numerous materials and substances that possess giant chemical structures. Some are common: like the grains of sand on the beach; the microprocessors in our computers; the graphite in our pencils, the magnesium oxide found in the cement on our buildings; the salt we put on our food; the metals found almost everywhere; and the precious gemstone diamond. These substances are vastly different and this is due to the bonding and the arrangements of chemicals atoms, or ions. Sand, graphite, and diamond are all examples of giant covalent structures. The bonding between the atoms is covalent, but the arrangements of the atoms can be different. Sand contains silicon atoms covalently bonded to oxygen atoms. It has four oxygen atoms bonded in a tetrahedral arrangement around each silicon atom. Diamond has a very similar structure to sand, where all of the carbon atoms are joined by covalent bonds in a tetrahedral arrangement. In graphite the carbon atoms are bonded in hexagonal sheets and have intermolecular forces holding the sheets together. All of the atoms are chemically joined by covalent bonds in sand, diamond and graphite and so these materials have very high melting points because a lot of energy is required to break the bonds between the atoms. They are very hard substances. Diamond is one of the hardest substances in the world, but graphite is quite soft. These layers peel away when our pencils make a mark on paper because the forces holding the layers together are intermolecular and are quite weak. So when you are writing with a pencil, you are actually transferring sheets of carbon. The structure of these materials also determines their electrical conductivity. Diamond does not conduct electricity at all, because its electrons are locked up in covalent bonds; whereas graphite contains free electrons and so can conduct. Silicon is found in semi-conductors and it through adding other elements, called ‘doping’, that it allows partial conductance, which has applications in computing. Table salt (sodium chloride) and magnesium oxide are examples of giant ionic lattices. Ionic bonds form when a metal reacts with a non-metal. Metals form positive ions; nonmetals form negative ions. Ionic bonds are the electrostatic forces of attraction between these oppositely charged ions. Giant ionic structures also have exceptionally high melting points, because the electrostatic interactions between the ions are very strong. Giant ionic lattices, when in the solid state, do not conduct electricity because their ions are fixed in the lattice.This lattice structure is lost when the solid is melted, freeing up ions which can then conduct electricity. The final giant structures we consider in this video are metals. These all share the same structure, whereby electrons in the outer shells of the metal atoms are free to move. The metallic bond is a force of attraction between these free electrons and the positively charged metal ions. Metallic bonds are strong, so metals maintain a regular structure and usually have high melting and boiling points. In addition to this, metals also have other common properties; they conduct heat and electricity because of the free electrons ability to move. Free electrons also allow the metal ions to slide past one another, and so can be hammered into shapes; this is called ‘malleability.’ The ease at which a metal can be pulled into wires depend on how ductile it is. LINK TO PART 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-s9AggUNmbw&feature=youtu.be SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
IONIC and COVALENT BONDING. GCSE Science Chemistry
 
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http://www.sciencetutorial4u.com This video covers the difference between ionic and covalent bonds for students studying for GCSE additional Science Chemistry. Refer to these timings to cover: 1. Why atoms bond? 00:07 2. Ionic Bond 01:10 3. Covalent Bond 02:13 Please like, subscribe and share, THANK YOU so much: https://youtu.be/wQ3NJUKKcTU 1. Why atoms bond? 00:07 Bond means chemical link which is responsible for holding atoms together. Atoms form chemical bond to have full outer shell of electrons. This makes the atom to become stable. 2. Ionic Bond 01:10 In ionic bonding, metal atom lose electron and non-metal atom gains electron. This transfer of electrons make the metal atom to become into a positively charged ion and the non-metal atom to become into a negatively charged ion. The positive and the negative ions have attraction ( electrostatic attraction) and this attraction is the ionic bonding. Ionic bonding happens between metal and non-metal, e.g. NaCl (Sodium Chloride). Ionic substance can form into a large structure called giant ionic structure. 3. Covalent Bond 02:13 In covalent bonding, the electrons are shared between the atoms. If there are one pair of electrons which is a total of two electrons in the overlap then such bonding is a single bond and has only one line. If there are two pairs of electrons which means a total of four electrons in the overlap then it is a double bond and it has two lines. Covalent bonding happens between non-metals and non-metals, for example water molecules which is H2O. Hydrogen is a non-metal and oxygen is a non-metal. Covalent substances can form into 3 types of structures which are simple molecular substances, giant covalent structures and nanoparticles. MUSICS: "Son of a Rocket" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ "Cut and Run" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 8274 sciencetutorial4u
Ionic and Covalent Compounds: Writing Names and Formulas
 
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Describes how to write names and formulas for ionic compounds and covalent compounds. You can see a listing of all my videos at my website, http://www.stepbystepscience.com
Views: 165892 Step-by-Step Science
Types Of Chemical Bonds - What Are Chemical Bonds - Covalent Bonds And Ionic Bonds - What Are Ions
 
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In this video we discuss how chemical bonds are formed, we cover ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Chemical bonding is important in many different functions of the body. Transcript and notes The interactions of 2 or more atoms mainly occur at the outermost shell, or energy level. The result of these interactions results in a chemical reaction. In atoms that have fewer or more than 8 electrons in their outermost energy level, reactions occur that result in the loss, gain, or sharing of electrons with another atom to satisfy the octet rule. The octet rule means that elements tend to combine so that each atom has 8 electrons in its outermost shell. This results in the formation of structures such as crystals or molecules. Two atoms of oxygen can combine with one atom of carbon to form carbon dioxide or CO2. There are two main types of chemical bonds, ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Ionic bonds are bonds where the transfer of electrons takes place. Let’s see how this type of bond works. So, here we have a sodium atom, which has an atomic number of 11, meaning it has 11 protons in its nucleus and 11 electrons in its shells or energy levels. Shell one has 2 electrons, shell 2 has 8 electrons and shell 3 has 1 electron. And here we have a chlorine atom, which has an atomic number of 17, so 17 protons and 17 electrons. It has 2 electrons in shell one, 8 in shell 2 and 7 in shell 3. We know that atoms want to have 8 electrons in their outer shell, so Sodium can give up one electron, and now it has 8 electrons in its outer shell, and chlorine can take that electron from sodium and that will give it 8 electrons in its outer shell. Since the sodium atom gave up an electron it now has 11 protons, which are positively charged, and 10 electrons which are negatively charged. This results in the formation of a sodium ion with a positive charge. An ion is an atom or molecule with a net electrical charge due to the loss or gain of an electron. Since the chlorine atom gained an electron, and now has 17 protons and 18 electrons, it is a chlorine ion with a negative charge. The positively charged sodium ion is now attracted to the negatively charged chlorine ion, and NaCl or table salt is formed. This is an ionic bond. So, ionic bonding is when an electron transfer takes place and generates 2 oppositely charged ions. Now for covalent bonds. Covalent bonds are chemical bonds that are formed by the sharing of one or more pairs of electrons by the outer energy levels or shells of two atoms. The 4 major elements of the body, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen almost always form covalent bonds by sharing electrons. So, for instance, 2 hydrogen atoms can bond by sharing a pair of electrons. Hydrogen is one of the exceptions to the octet rule of having 8 electrons in the outer shell, because it only has one shell. Let’s look at carbon dioxide or co2 again, which form a covalent bond. Oxygen has an atomic mass of 8, so 8 protons, and 8 electrons, 2 in its inner shell and 6 in its outer shell, so, oxygen atoms want 2 more electrons for their outer shell. Carbon has an atomic mass of 6, 6 protons and 6 electrons, 2 in the inner shell and 4 in the outer shell, so it wants 4 more electrons for its outer shell. They can make each other happy by sharing what they have. Oxygen atom number 1 can share 2 of its electrons and the carbon atom can share 2 of its electrons with oxygen atom number one, making oxygen atom number one happy. And oxygen atom number 2 can come in and like oxygen atom number one it can share two of its electrons and the carbon atom has 2 more of its own electrons that it can share with oxygen atom number 2. So now all 3 atoms are happy. By sharing 2 pairs of electrons in this situation a double bond has been formed, and double bonds are important in chemical reactions.
Views: 5548 Whats Up Dude
Chemical Bonding Introduction: Hydrogen Molecule, Covalent Bond & Noble Gases
 
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Chemical bonding introduction video shows how covalent bond means 2 hydrogen atoms can stick together to form a hydrogen molecule, H2. The video also explains why helium cannot form bonds and hence is called a noble gas. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript: Let's do a thought experiment. Imagine a box filled with hydrogen atoms. Like billiard balls on a pool table, atoms actually move, and they do it in straight lines until they hit something … like another hydrogen atom. Oh! See that? They stuck together. They’re not separate hydrogen atoms any more, but a pair of hydrogen atoms moving together. There goes another pair. 4.1 When atoms join up like this, scientists call it a molecule. And they call the join between them a chemical bond. Here comes another hydrogen atom crashing into the hydrogen molecule. But this time it doesn’t stick. Instead it just bounces off. Hydrogen atoms bond once, and that’s it. They’re just like that. Pretty quickly all the hydrogen atoms will collide and pair off into molecules. They will keep hitting each other, but they'll just bounce off. Scientists like to have a shorthand way of writing this molecule thingi. Here’s one way to show it, with the hydrogen symbols joined by a stick to show the chemical bond between the atoms. Another way is to write H2, with the little 2 after the H and a bit lower. A number written this way is called a subscript. What do you think the 2 stands for? It counts the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule. Easy, heh! So when we have a balloon filled with hydrogen gas, it really contains trillions of trillions of H2 molecules. Let's do another thought experiment. We'll go back to our box filled with hydrogen atoms, but this time put an oxygen atom in there too. When a hydrogen atom crashes into an oxygen atom, they stick together. But wait, when another hydrogen atom hits, it also sticks to the oxygen. What about a third hydrogen atom? No, that’s if for oxygen. It can only make 2 bonds and then it’s done.
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